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25

I hate to break it to you, but you did make those changes, just not on purpose. Your continued research was on the right track. The OP committed an edit to the post while you were working on your edit, and this happened within 5 minutes of the OP's previous edit. Since it was within 5 minutes, it is considered to be within the grace period and subsequent ...


22

There used to be a userscript on Stack Apps to do this, but the link died and the author hasn't put it back up. If anyone wants to track them down and ask them to rehost it, that would be nice.


15

I'm the author of the userscript mentioned by @Scimonster. I've spend a few hours trying to get the script working, but no luck. I've put the script online here, so if you can get it working, please do.


11

Reviewers were lazy. Most of them didn't consider your edit to be destructive - but they thought it was a reply rather than an addition. That's not your fault; folks just didn't read it carefully. Something you might want to consider though, which might improve your chances of getting the edit through... This is what you wrote to describe your edit when you ...


7

You could run a query through data.stackexchange.com. For example, the query: SELECT 'site://suggested-edits/'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,id)+'|Suggested Edit #'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,id) [Suggested Edit Link], PostId as [Post Link], Comment, CreationDate, CASE WHEN ApprovalDate IS NOT NULL THEN 'Approved' WHEN RejectionDate IS NOT NULL THEN 'Rejected' ...


5

You cannot withdraw a suggested edit once it has been made. If you found a mistake, though, you can make additional edits to your suggestion and your submission will be updated to reflect those different changes. This does not clear previous Reject votes, but if you've corrected your edit then it should get approved.


4

OP can always approve/reject suggested edits, regardless of their reputation. These are counted in their review stats. As an example, the following suggested edit review shows OP's username on a gray background, depicting the fact that OP reviewed the suggested edit:


4

Focus on what you can do, not on what you can't do. You must at least edit 6 characters to increase the chance that your edit is substantial. When you make an edit at your reputation level, your edit must be reviewed and approved by other people. Editing one character might improve the post, but not substantially, and it's not worth it to let people review ...


4

You suggested about 50 tag edits on November 7th, many of which were (correctly!) rejected as inappropriate. As a result, you have been blocked from suggesting edits for some time. For instance, you suggested that the multidex tag wiki have the content: The multidex classes will not be included in the classes.dex file (the first one read by the ...


4

There was nothing per se wrong with your edit. In fact, it was even a good edit. The problem was with your summary. You only mentioned fixing the table format. Most editors, if they see big changes like that, without a clear description of why they improve the post, will reject it as being too drastic a change. Next time, if you want to do that, mention ...


2

I would say since there are no answers that would be invalidated, don't roll it back. Let it be as long as the question still makes sense and nothing important and crucial has been removed through the edit.


2

You can ping any editor of the post using @username in the comments. You'll have to write username by hand, it won't auto-complete. This will notify that user in their global inbox. From Shog9's post: Leave a comment for the editor. Yes, you can ping editors by typing @ your edit was harmful due to or some such in a comment on the post that was ...


2

There were a number of problematic changes in an edit prior to the retagging, such as removing "in Java" from the title1 without adding it to the question body, and even more problematic, changing the .NET version from a comparative example to the goal of the question. Someone needs a good talking to, and it's not necessarily the reviewers or the low ...


2

Until a suggested edit has been approved or rejected, the editor can continue editing, potentially resulting in very different edits being seen by each reviewer. Normally, that doesn't happen - folks will re-edit to fix a few typos they missed the first time around, but making dramatic changes (particularly when the first set of changes is poor) isn't a ...


2

I found these two links in another meta post earlier today: My Rejected Edits My Accepted Edits You'll need to enter your user id in the field at the bottom of the post and then hit run query.


1

Too many rejected edit suggestions Bhumi Shah had 309 edit suggestions approved, and 70 edit suggestions rejected Although I found this, the equation may be outdated? "When deciding on whether we should ban or not, we now look at your last 7 days of activity. If (rejects - (approvals / 3)) >= 5, you will be auto-banned." SOURCE: Too many of your ...


1

No, and I doubt the usefulness of it. You should make sure your edit is totally perfect. If you doubt that, don't hit the Edit button. If you feel your edit is totally okay, one reviewer that rejects your edit shouldn't bring you off that much. Here on SO, there are three votes needed, so just wait on the opinion of the remaining reviewers.


1

There are bigger, more important things to improve in a post other than the code's formatting style. Did you check the question for correct spelling? Was there correct grammar and sentence structure? Does it read well (as in, if you read it out loud, does it make some sense)? If your edits only focus on the code, then they really are too simple. Adding ...



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