Hot answers tagged

59

A lot of red flags came up for me. Here's why: There's a lot of new information It's being added in as if you had said it You yourself said that you didn't know if it worked To be blunt, the third reason would be enough to reject it, but from an outsider's standpoint, 1 and 2 are good reasons to reject it outright. If they want to add that information, ...


52

I'm strongly in favour of edits like this. Syntax highlighting, tab-size consistency and wrapping to avoid horizontal scrolling can make a significant difference to the legibility of a code sample — especially for users with visual acuity difficulties (like me!). Similarly, fixing typos can make it much easier for users (not all of whom are first-language ...


39

The rule is simple: Improve whatever needs improvement. If the only improvement that should be done is in the title, go ahead and edit it, even if it's only one character; However, if the post contains other errors (formation, spelling, bad indentation, etc) you shouldn't only fix that typo in the title, but rather try to edit everything (that what makes ...


38

I rejected some of his edits, but what else am I supposed to do about this? Continue like that. Evaluate each edit in isolation. Approve if the edit is good, improve if it can be improved, reject if it's detrimental to the post and reject and edit if you feel that the post needs another kind of work. I read before that SO very strongly discourages ...


22

I don't think that the proposed edit is a good way to deal with dead links. In this special case, the strike-through tags introduced invalid HTML, as mentioned by @MikeMcCaughan. In general, strike-through text introduces a revision history within the post. This shouldn't be, because we have the revision history for that. A post should always contain the ...


21

How invested are you in the outcome? If you truly believe it is a bad edit, and you are willing to put forth the effort to babysit the post until the edit is approved or rejected, it is definitely acceptable to rollback an edit that you feel should not have been applied in the first place. If you are truly invested in the post, and are willing to further ...


20

If this happened to me, I would reject it because I can't verify that it makes my answer better. If I came across it in the suggested edit queue, I would reject it as an attempt to answer the question or address the author, that much information should instead be included in a separate answer.


12

Just to be clear, we had heuristics like this at one point. They triggered automatic conversion to Community Wiki. We replaced them with moderator flags, presuming human oversight was likely to be less error-prone than fully automated actions. We were correct. For all the hand-wringing yesterday, that's the first error in two years, out of 10 posts that ...


9

Ping the editor with a comment reply on one of their approved suggestions. Remind them to be more diligent and fix all aspects of a post before posting a suggestion. If they are fixing tags, they should also make sure the rest of the post is in good shape. If that fails, flag one of the posts for moderator intervention and explain the situation. There ...


9

That edit should have been a comment on your answer, not an edit to your answer. Any concerns with the content and quality of the code in an answer should be made to the original poster as a comment, not an edit. When an edit like this comes up, it looks to the reviewers like another user is trying to introduce content that "deviates from the original ...


8

I don't agree with these proposed changes. I would consider myself to be a very good editor and I would also consider my changes to be very responsible. I've also earned the privilege to make direct edits to content. And yes, I know that there are others with that privilege who really should have their edits reviewed once or twice. It cuts both ways. ...


7

It's seems pretty clear that a question fundamentally about a particular operation is going to assume that anyone interested with an answer surrounding a particular intricacy of that answer has a basic idea of what the operation itself is supposed to do. If someone comes across the question and doesn't even know that the string copy method exists to copy a ...


6

As you already found, you can always revert edits that you disapprove of. If the same user keeps making these edits to the same post, you can flag for moderator attention - edit wars are not allowed. But we should assume good faith from our editors. Many of them truly believe they are helping. The fact that there are approval-happy reviewers isn't helping, ...


6

Your edit should have been rejected (as it was) and if found useful by the OP or members of community - edited back (as it happened now). There is absolutely no way to see how the added text relates to the text in the post or question without spending a significant time reading the question, comments, and answer. At best this look like audit, or just ...


6

I would have happily rejected your suggested edit for being a response to the OP instead of an attempt to move useful information from a comment into the post. The reason for that is the lack of seeing that comment on the answer: Comment: I wrote this extra explanation in a comment, but it fits better with this answer. OK, great, let's see how you ...


5

I'll prefix this by saying that I'm not entirely sure I would have approved your edit; it's fairly dubious, and it's hard to be sure the same benefit to the site couldn't be achieved by e.g. writing a new answer that happened to cover that concern alongside answering the rest of the question. As such, only an extremely solid edit summary and a very clear set ...


7

Well, taking a look at that user's suggested edits, I can easily understand the rejecting user's frustration with someone who consistently submits lots of edit-suggestions following that same pattern. Yes, the edit-rejection-reason is not quite the right way to voice that problem. A moderator-attention-flag with details and lots of examples is probably more ...


3

In the same vein of thought as Makoto, I would like to make a slight alternative suggestion to the restrictions. Instead of making edit protection moderator/post-owner only, let's make it a high-level privilege; protecting questions already instills a reputation requirement, anyway (admittedly a pretty low one). Giving users the ability to edit ...


3

The one thing that drives me nuts are users who search for a misspelled word and then correct it for 50 posts in a row without correcting anything else from the same posts. It wouldn't be so bad if the posts/questions they corrected didn't come back all the way up to the front page, but they do. And often times, many of those questions/answers they edit ...


2

Can anyone explain or tell me what's going on He was reviewing a suggested edit to his own question. Users are always able to accept or reject suggested edit to their own questions (or answers), regardless of their reputation.


2

Just take a look at the review-task, and you will be enlightened: The user is marked as the posts author, and the author always can exercise a binding vote for suggested edits, even if he has exhausted his allotted tasks per day, or cannot ordinarily review at all due to insufficient reputation.


2

The level of tolls of this site that are so quick to complain about things is amazing. When there are issues with a member how about contacting them instead of having a secret meeting about them? Since this was created I have had numerous down-votes on my questions all out of spite from some less than helpful user. That is not right and the individuals ...


1

You can't cancel suggested edits. Not on regular posts, and not on tag wikis. Your edit will either be approved or declined in due course (it has been for your most recent edit).



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible