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34

They were right in this instance. There were multiple other issues with the post. See the edit I've made to the post; http://stackoverflow.com/revisions/25369648/4. I've removed the unnecessary "TIA", fixed the code indentation, removed the storyline "Edits", and fixed the tags. As I said in a post here (see also here): The thing to be careful here ...


26

As these are clearly not being done by the OP I would reject them. There is absolutely no point in mass editing posts to convert code to Stack Snippets as I've said both here, here and on Meta Stack Exchange. If you find you have to edit one of your own posts for any reason then that's the time to update any code to be a snippet.


18

Because there has been a long (and still ongoing) problem of users incorrectly reviewing suggested edits, despite having the privilege to edit posts without review. Too many people simply don't put in the attention to evaluating edits that they do in actually making them.


12

Title edits are generally considered important enough to stand on their own, without being considered too minor. Titles are what draws a reader into the post, so the more attractive and professional looking the title, the better the chances of attracting like-minded professionals who may have answers. I also approach suggested edits, for the purpose of rep ...


10

I find that, when users do this, they often do not know that they are doing anything wrong. They think that they're helping out and do not realize that just adding a tag is not worth two reputation. Rejecting the edit is the way to go, but what you really want to do is leave a custom reason and explain that mass retags are not good suggested edits unless ...


9

Yes, there is a compelling reason for the minimum character count. Your suggested edits are going to go into a review queue. If minor edits were allowed, the queue would be quickly clogged up with one-character spelling corrections. Make the edit count instead. Don't waste reviewers time with a minor change that, in the big scheme of things, doesn't really ...


9

This is by design. Your 'Improve' edit adds a new revision to the post, automatically making it impossible for the suggested edit to be applied. Note that it is the Community User that rejects the suggested edit. The same would happen if you went directly to the post, and in the revision history of that post clicked the 'edit' link on the most recent ...


9

Pointless edits should be rejected. An edit that doesn't improve a low-quality post to the point that it no longer needs to be deleted is too minor. It's pointless.


7

As of late last week, we're now giving suggested-edit reviewers a limited period of exclusivity. What this means: When you view a pending suggested edit, the system will avoid assigning that edit to any other reviewers until you've submitted your review or a reasonable period of time (currently 3 minutes) has passed. The number of "in review" tasks is ...


7

I do not believe that retagging is too minor. It adds major value to the question. To quote from the quote in Matt's answer: If however, there is little else to improve in the post, I'd "approve" it; the edits do need making; the questions are incorrectly tagged. From what I can see, there is little else to improve in that post. For more views on ...


6

A similar question was asked on Meta SE. Gilles's answer: ...you can only Improve a post if you would have the right to edit it unsupervised. For questions and answers, the requirement is the same as approving edits: 2000 reputation. For tag wikis, you can approve at 5000 reputation, but you need 20000 to make your own unsupervised edit. So as long as ...


6

I don't much care for your technique here, or rather I don't think I like the technique you'd be encouraging by focusing reviewers in this manner. Here's what I do when I review tag edits: The important step here is that you don't review it if you don't know anything about the topic and don't care to learn. Basing your tag approvals / rejections on ...


6

That is... Really complicated. And review ain't exactly a simple system to start with. We're going a different route in our efforts to address this problem: As of late last week, we're now giving suggested-edit reviewers a limited period of exclusivity. I think this will serve to accomplish the same goals with relative simplicity.


6

If you're going to edit code from another source into the question, you have to make it clear in the edit summary where that code is coming from. Otherwise, it looks like you're inserting your own code, which is an attempt to reply to or comment on the existing post. Try this: Inserted code from [source: JSFiddle, comments, etc.] for context You said ...


5

Too minor is when you put in too little effort. Too minor is when you don't do enough. Too minor is repainting the titanic while it sinks. Too minor is when I could make a better edit and uncheck "this edit is helpful". Too minor is when you replace a tag with one that should burninated. Too minor is capitalization. Too minor is when if people approve it, ...


5

The button is grayed out because another suggested edit was pending for that post. If you are already editing the post when an edit is applied, you can continue to edit and submit the edit as long as it is more extensive than the already-applied one. However, you will not be able to start editing after one has already been submitted. The button is grayed ...


2

The suggested edit is for an answer, so you only get to edit the answer itself. When improving a suggested edit for a question, you will be able to edit the title and tags.


1

Because we are humans. And if you can edit a post on your own, chances are you are focusing on the task at hand. But if an edit comes through an automated process like the edit queue the chances of you just switching to “auto-pilot” is high. It’s not a perfect system, but it works if you understand what humility is.


1

The reason for the explicit discrepancy is apparent in the disparate effects of the two actions. If you make an edit yourself, nobody gains rep. If you approve a suggested edit, someone gains 2 rep. Hence the additional verification. You can approve that rep unilaterally by 'improving' the edit, but that is enough additional work that it won't ...


1

I think that the answer is very clear, if you want to follow what's intended by this change. If the edit improves the post, approve it. Yes, that means if they add (useful) code formatting you should approve it. Yes, that means if they add a truly useful tag approve it. (I still reject a lot of tag-edits because they add a stupid tag that doesn't belong ...


1

As per the linked discussions, the correct answer is found here: Lightness Races In Orbit's answer on "What should be used in place of “Too Minor?”" Does it improve the post to any degree? Accept it. So in other words, edits that were previously considered as "too minor" can now just be accepted. This attitude seems to be reflected in the much ...


1

In these cases I usually take a look at the whole post seeking for comments that may have generated those edits, as general practice. I do so in order to avoid rejecting a valid edit. Now, adding missing includes makes sense as long as: They are substantial to understand the problem. Posted code is intended to be a Minimal, Complete and Verifiable ...


1

I'd just reject these as too minor. Whilst the edit isn't actually wrong the benefit of adding this tag to questions already tagged sql-server is extremely minor or entirely non existent. Certainly not worth three reviewers' time to evaluate.


1

When people are new, they don't always know how to see comments for rejections, and there is no way to know who is trying to be helpful versus who is only trying to gain reputation points in their edits. I agree that custom comments should be delivered to a user's inbox so that new users will at least have ideas from the reviewers on their radar. Of course, ...



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