Hot answers tagged

134

Complete nonsense. That's the torrent of our regular public data dump. Note the torrent URL, the "hacker" is database guru extraordinaire Brent Ozar, and it's linked on http://www.brentozar.com/archive/2015/10/how-to-download-the-stack-overflow-database-via-bittorrent/. If you refresh http://stackoverflow.com/error often enough, you can even see evidence of ...


109

Many people are very quick to point out that hinting that an email exists in the system as part of a login error is a bad idea. What most people don't talk about is that nearly all of those systems that give vague error messages like "Either your email or password is wrong", will flat out tell you "That email already exists" on a sign up page, rendering that ...


87

Given the user's story, I believe the moderator did the wrong thing in this case. Leaving 154 helpful comments is doing a great service to our community. Doing it in a short amount of time is efficient and productive. I can think of a couple of topics on which I've left scores of comments that say basically the same thing. But I've done it over time, and ...


80

Your question will be voted upon, as every other question on MSO is. Some people will not like it (and downvote it), some will find it interesting (and upvote it), some will consider it off-topic (and vote to close it). To me, it sounds like a good idea for a self-answered discussion. There won't be any administrative actions, you're not violating the terms ...


78

I've logged them out, in case they left themselves at a public terminal, and temporarily suspended their account until they respond. We occasionally see this with university students or those using shared public terminals. There's a bit of history here, so I suspect this isn't due to a compromised account. I'll give them the benefit of the doubt, though.


73

I tend to agree with your notion. Lots of those "example" codes run in production environments worldwide, and it's better for everyone (not just the developer community, but everyone) if their data is stored securely. That said, your method was a little too aggressive, and without looking at the community consensuses in place. Do not be afraid to edit ...


50

I'm the author of JS Bin. Firstly, the redirect spam has long been a problem, and (I can only assume) since JS Bin is coming up on 8 years old, it's been the goto tool for abuse. I addressed the redirect spam a few years ago with this: http://jsbin.com/blog/security-limited-output#limitedfulloutputforanonymousbins - but I can see, with the bin you raise ...


45

I think the problem is not in the snippets but with the owner of the router. If your router can be hacked by a stack snippet, it can also be hacked by a malicious banner ad or by any website for that matter. They could probably just paste the code in a JSFiddle and gain the same effect. It would be a shame to limit this functionality just because some ...


38

We've covered this before: How to deal with highly voted answers with security vulnerabilities? The general consensus is that if you can "fix" the answer without destroying it, do so. If not, it may be worth while adding a warning to the answer, as well as a new answer. This doesn't always work however: http://stackoverflow.com/a/907821/338665 The top ...


37

To put it frankly, the edit came from your account on an existing login session from a couple days before. Past that, there's really not anything else we'd be able to tell you about what happened here on Stack Overflow that you don't already know happened. Keep in mind that since you are accessing the site using Facebook credentials, you need to make sure ...


35

A fix for this just rolled out. I've been reworking how we render some common bits of pages, and messed up encoding rules on the body summary in the refactor.


34

Jeff Atwood addressed this point in a relatively recent blog post relating to his experience making a login for Discourse. I assume the same mentality is held at Stack Overflow: OK, so we know that email is de-facto identity for most people, and this is a logical and necessary state of affairs. But which of my 10 email addresses did I use to log into ...


27

... but assuming someone could log into my Stack Overflow account using a Facebook tab I left open somewhere, or worse, by guessing my password, how bad can this use of my account by someone else be? Considering that you're held responsible for any actions taken on your account, whether or not they were by you, I'd say...it can be pretty bad. ...


20

The real problem here is not being addressed as far as I can see, which is: votes don't indicate post quality. You can't blame someone for posting a shotgun-approach answer like "Do a chmod 777, it fixes all permission issues". The same happens for Windows Services ("Just run it as Local System [i.e. administrator]"). You can't blame such posters for not ...


20

A CSRF attack like those in the post don't require JavaScript or even a code snippet. All you would need to do is include an img tag like this: <img src="http://192.168.0.1/?somethingbad"> See: Open your network panel and refresh the page and you will see the request (unless you're using NoScript's ABE feature, or some other browser firewall ...


17

You are only looking at the side of what the account means to you, not what it means to the owners of the site and the community. If your account is compromised, you are not the only victim. And besides, password vaults that generate passwords are free and easy to use and since you are a security expert, you surely use one, right?


16

As others in the comments said - Stack Overflow isn't a bank. We don't need to have the kind of security that a bank does. Additionally (also mentioned in comments), there is a trade off between making something secure and making it easy to use. In this case, we have chosen on the side of usability. In the worst case, we are leaking that someone is using ...


16

I think the problem is not with the owner of the router, but with the snippets. Now, the reason I am going to talk will seem like a bit of a stretch at first, but it's still a valid argument. Why something has to change Before reading about this post, I thought that I could feel safe running snippets here on Stack Overflow. When I download torrents, I ...


14

As one of the reviewers who reluctantly rejected at least one of your edits, I'd strongly recommend hashing it out in visible comments first. If you're making some arbitrary edit to a highly-visible answer with no signs of previous discussion, I'm insufficiently confident in my own cryptanalytic abilities to sign off on that. Comment, then edit. This solves ...


14

We have: The data in our NY Datacenter (stored on SSD, backups on HDD and LTO tape) The data in our CO Datacenter (stored on SSD, backups on HDD) Offsite backups in Glacier's West 2 region (stored on ¯\_(ツ)_/¯, presumably LTO tape) So any wide geographic disaster would need to hit all of these, and an EMP would need to be one that wiped all of the above ...


13

Sorry this happened, but I'm not sure it really has anything to do with Stack Overflow. You ask a stranger at the grocery store if knows which oranges you should buy; he invites you out to his van where he says he has really good oranges, and then takes your wallet. Do you complain to the grocery store? None of what happened is their responsibility. On the ...


12

Meh. A downvote and a comment should usually suffice. Sometimes, it may be appropriate to edit out the problem; sometimes the entire post is worthless and should be downvoted. The effort required to classify and evaluate security problems in code would be gigantic. If people are dumb enough to copy&paste code from the Internet and not read the ...


12

FWIW, I have to agree the moderator did SO a disservice if he deleted 154 helpful comments merely because they all arrived at once. I don't agree with the warning label jpmc26 suggests. It is nebulous, and the hair-on-fire ServerFault answer it references is basically wrong: the consequences it describes flow from 1) having root privilege and 2) using ...


11

Wow. I hope you'll find this funny even though I've called in the heavy cavalry and people used some of their time on this, but after BradLarson commented that "it does look like that question was posted from your location.", I've asked around and found that the culprit was... ... my dear father, on whose computer we frequently consult Stack Overflow when ...


11

No, this would be a bad idea. The last thing I want to do as a moderator is to review potential security issues in answers. First, we can't possibly be subject matter experts in every single language or framework on this site. Knowledge of vulnerabilities is even more rarified than that, and requires constant updates. This flag would be horribly misused, ...


8

I am not really getting what is wrong with writing a bot on SO to generate reputation. I have never seen that this is illegal (if I am wrong please point me to the explanation), assuming that your bot is doing useful things. If you will find a way to automatically answer questions or edit bad answers to make them better - this is amazing and I assume that ...


8

I am writing to support jmpc26's answer. It is rather meant as a comment, but there is not enough place, and no pictures are possible. In the German Wikipedia, there are such hints for instance for medical and legal subjects. They are signals for readers that they must be careful in the application of the written text, and it is IMHO also some nonwarranty ...


7

I think this is working as intended. This behaviour should only exist for trusted identity providers who validate emails. If anybody sees this behavior in a different/exploitable context, please say so. You don't even have to bother with associating the accounts if you are using an existing "trusted“ provider like Gmail, Yahoo, etc. -just use the same ...


7

(This is quite similar to this question.) The first thing to do is to leave a comment and write your own alternative answer (if possible). In general, I wouldn't edit the code in an existing answer. Editing the code in an answer that is not yours can cause three problems: You're saying you know better, but maybe you don't. From a neutral point of view, ...



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