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33

I believe any non-trivial reputation gains (in my opinion larger than 2, or maybe even 1), might encourage "witch hunts" of sorts. For example, after a question has been downvoted once or twice, and the first comment on the question is Possible duplicate of [some question], users may instinctively flag it as a duplicate on the basis that others will ...


16

Here are your deleted answers: jquery - get src of image set by picturefill - Question posing as answer (deleted by a diamond moderator due to flag raised) Formastic Bootstrap Rails Error- No Such File to Load ButtonsHelpers - Promotional answer that does not explain how the library solves the problem (naked promotion) - Deleted by diamond moderator due ...


15

No, this is a terrible idea. The limit is ridiculously low (15 rep). Its there to prevent users to make sure users have some idea of how the site works, and more importantly to prevent voting fraud. Remove the limit and all I need to do is create a bunch of accounts to get unlimited rep.


11

reducing my reputation from 16 to -4 No way that happened. The minimum reputation is 1. You can't go under that. Regardless - what happened is that the question got deleted. And the reputation changes it caused - gone with it.


11

I believe this is a good idea and will result in a cleaner SE, a SE closer to the ideal one where you can always easily find the answer you're looking for. I'm tired of seeing so many poor questions where there is already another one being asked in a perfect manner and has been answered! But I have to walk through a pile of duplicates to reach the answer. ...


10

This is what the bounty system is for. To attract attention and good answers to unanswered questions, offer bounties on them. Increasing the point value on old questions would almost certainly cause some people not to answer them, in hopes of getting more points later. While enough others would probably answer to offset that gaming, askers would be ...


7

If every question I've ever had is already answered (directly or indirectly), how can I earn reputation? By answering questions, of course! I've only asked 2 questions on Stack Overflow. And only one of those got an answer from another user. Everything else, I've self-taught or found solutions for through the system. That doesn't prevent me from answering ...


6

The counter on the top shows the change in reputation since you last clicked it. You haven't clicked on the icon since the UTC morning of December 18th at least. Since that time you gained +40 in votes and accepts, and you lost -20 when a user account was removed. That means that your net gain since that time was +20.


6

It'll show 9999, and then 10k. So, it switches at 10k. As for 1 million rep, it'll show 1m. SE's number formatter already supports it:


5

The profile says: This account is temporarily suspended for voting irregularities. The suspension period ends in 12 hours. Which is why reputation is displayed as 1. This is by design. From the official blog post: Depending on the severity of the problem behavior — and at the complete discretion of the moderator — your account will be placed in ...


5

It cuts out the noise. You're just going to have to spend some time answering questions to get some reputation.


4

Mouse over the 96 and the tooltip tells you: You posted 102 answers (that are not Community Wiki) with a total net score of 96. The net score is the total number of upvotes on those answers, minus the total number of downvotes on the same. The score is recalculated once a day, around 03:00 UTC, so the two answers you posted today in that tag do not yet ...


4

You made the post a Community Wiki post by checking a checkbox when you posted. You cannot get reputation for Community Wiki posts; the tooltip on the checkbox explains this: If this was a mistake, you can flag your post for moderator attention (use the other option) and request that they remove the CW status. You cannot get the reputation for the votes ...


4

Jarrod’s answer discusses why it is bad idea to answer very poor questions, but does not directly address what to do if you have already answered such a question. It seems that there is no official policy on when you should delete your own answers, but usual practice is to avoid deleting them. Once an answer is posted, it is up to other people to up-vote or ...


3

Instead of answering questions that are obviously off-topic and/or guaranteed to be duplicates, which most of the "on hold" questions are nowadays, spend the time instead on finding a duplicate and voting to close on the duplicate. And if it is an extremely obvious duplicate, downvote the question as well, and if a bunch of rep whores answer immediately ...


3

The most complete explanation of reputation changes after post deletion is explained in the How does "Reputation" work? post at the network-wide meta.stackexchange.com site. With regard specifically to upvoted but deleted posts, posts which have been on the site for 60 days and with a score >= 3 will not result in a loss of reputation when the post is ...


3

You downvoted a post that was later deleted. Your reputation log still reflects that you downvoted, but a later day will have a +1 post removed entry. The entry is only there to mark when you voted and would have lost reputation; the actual vote is undone as the post is now deleted. As such it doesn't play in the cap for that day either, the vote did not ...


2

As pointed out by Mat in his comment on my question: This post on Stack Exchange's Meta explains that down votes both given and received do not count towards the earned at least 200 reputation requirement: ...whether you cast or receive them [down votes], they will no longer deduct from your daily total towards Mortarboard, Epic, and Legendary.– Jarrod ...



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