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254

Why do so many people not consider signing up, let alone contributing? Because most of them never need to. They have no reason to sign up. They can find the answers to the problems that they have by searching through questions already asked, and never need to ask new ones. What are we doing wrong, or not doing? We're not doing anything wrong. ...


60

I wouldn't call it apathy, necessarily. It's a problem of motivation, all right? Now if I work my ass off and Initech ships a few extra units, I don't see another dime, so where's the motivation? And here's something else, Bob: I have eight different bosses right now... Oops... Sorry. Got carried away there. Anyway, here's how it breaks down... The ...


56

Signing up for an account and then contributing also means you need to put yourself out there, and risk saying something stupid/wrong - or asking a dumb question and ending up on the programming humor subreddit ;) Most people I know are pretty scared of being publicly embarrassed or one-upped. @Servy is right that because Stack Overflow works so well at ...


47

I'm going to take the opposite stance of Servy's answer here. It reflects conversations I've had with close colleagues and coworkers when I bring up Stack Overflow. Why do so many people not consider signing up, let alone contributing? Most people don't consider signing up because they're terrified to. They have no willpower to sign up; although ...


32

I have the same experience (only account around me), and for a long time didn't have an account myself. The problem? There was no value to having an account. I suspect this is the primary issue for most people, and worst of all, it affects the very users we want to attract the most. To start with, there were two reasons I made my account: I had a ...


18

There's a stigma surrounding 'signing up' for something, mostly due to how horribly nuts other sites unnecessarily complicate the process. I seldom sign up for things these days even when I stand to gain something by doing so, because the site fails to convince me that I won't lose anything like: My privacy My time, in figuring out how to unsubscribe from ...


18

Removing downvotes for new users' questions Never going to happen. Irrespective of the user's reputation, bad questions are not welcome here. Display an in-page popup to highlight the main rules when a new user wants to ask a question The Ask a Question page already features How to Ask at the top of the sidebar, with plenty of handy hints. ...


14

To answer both your questions: Is it fair to flag those posts as Low Quality Posts? Is it fair to recommend deletion, as This is commentary on another post, not an answer? Yes it is. The fact that the user has a low amount of rep doesn't change the rules they should adhere to. It only takes 50 rep to be able to comment everywhere. That amount isn't ...


13

I can't log in at work as my network access to google login is blocked. I can get stack overflow though, so my workday it's read only. Also as a relative new comer it can be quite difficult to not get a shed ton of negative rep for asking a duplicate question or making a simple mistake, there is a high tendency to bite the newcomers as Wikipedia phrases it. ...


10

I see a couple of issues here. The low-quality review queue, to which you refer, also processes questions from established users. Nobody is immune from their answer being flagged VLQ or NAA. For such users, "Welcome" would not make sense. Some of the non-answers deleted from the queue are entirely non-constructive and fall just short of being flagged as ...


9

Why don't people sign up and contribute? Short answer: As Servy said, "Because most of them never need to." Long answer (check TL;DR at the end): First we need to find what people cannot do without registering. We could just see Why should I create an account?, or ask ourselves: Why people would like to sign up? - To ask new questions - To give new answers ...


9

In my opinion, skilled developers don't sign up because they already get a lot of benefit out of SO, and they don't think the reward/effort ratio is high enough to contribute. Rewards are different and better than what lurkers think Before I was a contributer to SO, I thought the rewards would be: Showing off my skills and perhaps getting a job. This ...


7

I don't think SO is doing anything particularly "wrong." Nothing is perfect and I'm sure there are improvements that may foster more participation. However, there are some fundamental points that I think might possibly perchance in some conceivable way be influencing a developer's decision on whether or not to sign-up. Developers are inherently ...


6

Just an example to confirm Servy's answer. I had used stackoverflow for a long time just as a reader without an account. Because I used google as primary source of information, and soon found that wikipedia and stackoverflow both contained high quality articles, SO being my reference as a Q&A site. And one day, the proposed solution was not enough for ...


5

(Maybe if it gets implemented it should be checkboxes, so that the asker actually have to active do something to click on the boxes) – Rizier123 @Rizier123: :-) It's really tempting to make them checkboxes, isn't it? Perhaps just for new users. But probably overkill. We don't want barriers to questions, just encouragement of properly-asked ...


4

You specifically mention the workplace in your question. Plus, "how about a few answers too now and again to 'put back' what you get" I'd like to point out that getting the information that you need to do your job is what you get paid for. On the contrary, helping others with their problems outside the company is not what you get paid for. If you are ...


4

Move along folks, nothing to see here... (Next time, just flag - the mods will investigate and Take Action as needed)


3

I feel the sign up aspect has been covered in other answers, but let me take a new look at contribute, from my own perspective. When I first signed up with Stack Overflow, it was for my own needs. I didn't care about helping the site, I cared about the site helping me. For a bit, the site was this cool new thing for me, like many things in my life are. ...


2

I won't remark on the general case as I think existing answers cover it fairly well. To summarize my answer: it's possible some small portion of the 90-99% (lurkers) are unable or not authorized to contribute for one reason or another, including: Technical limitations (such as an old computer with an old browser, where development machines are not ...


2

I know this post is 1 year old, but it still lacks a status-completed or status-declined. When I tried to write a new question, after searching SO and using google with no luck, I found similar questions that solved my doubt just by checking the linked questions in the right side. If I used exactly the same title when searching, I guess the new results were ...


1

"I'm wondering why people don't get a little rep (15) to be able to upvote to give a stronger indicator of which answer works plus as a thanks to the posters - to "give back" to the site." Because "get a little rep (15)" actually takes quite a bit of effort. You can't just sign up and upvote - even if you really want to. I get that there are (probably ...


1

People don't sign up because they don't care about maintaining their record. When they have a question that needs to be answered and they can't find the solution with search option they will ask, get an answer and leave till the next time. it's the same thing as for example if you are looking to identify a song. You might ask 1,2,5,10 request for identify ...


1

Gamification doesn't appeal to everybody. Some just want the practical benefits that don't need an account.


1

No you should not. You accepted an answer there, which indicates the issue is resolved (for you as the poster). No further changing is necessary as is indicated in the help-tour to every new user. And freeing up the title is not necessary. First of all it is not a good title, so why would you make it possible for others to use it and second if you did free ...


1

I'd say the cost/benefit is too high. One of the things that made SO successful was what Jeff Atwood called its low friction nature. Now, since then we've been made some compromises that added a little bit of friction (requiring signup, for instance; preventing certain words in titles, duplicate titles, etc.), but it's still basically show up, sign up, ask ...



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