Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

Post an answer with the correct information and a detailed explanation of the circumstances. Whether you unmark the other guy's answer or not is up to you. The impact on the original poster will be minimal. I'd personally prefer that the correct answer be accepted.


3

Stack Overflow was never a library Is that what we aspire to? Absolutely, especially with posts like this one. But that's never going to happen on Stack Overflow organically. It requires users like these who are willing to spend their time contributing high-quality content. Let's face it: most of us are not up for that. What Stack Overflow is (mostly) ...


1

I am female, I don't deny my femininity in real life, but I am going to carry on using "he" because (a) 9/10 programmers are male so it is more likely to be accurate and (b) "he" has been used as a neutral pronoun for centuries anyway, so there is plenty of precedent for this being correct. There is really no point in anyone getting concerned about a ...


-4

How about another take on all this. Why don't we just put a Male or Female choice for SO profiles? And have them display next to the name. Like the arrow one for male and Egyptian cross looking thing for female? That way there's much more transparency and everyone can easily respect each other. It's so much nicer to refer to someone as [he] or [she] AND ...


2

I've come across this problem fairly frequently throughout my career. The following rules of thumb have worked well for me: If you know for certain the gender of the person, then use the appropriate pronouns. If it is easy to avoid the use of the pronouns without making the content harder to read, then avoid using the gender specific pronouns entirely. If ...


-3

This is ridiculous. If i refer to a user as "he", but the user is actually a "she", and said user becomes offended, that is the user making nothing into an issue. When a gender is not known, it is perfectly normal to say "he". This is common in human language. It is human nature. Personally, i sometimes refer to uers as he/she. I think this is more than ...


0

Disclaimer: I am not a woman, nor do I believe for a moment that careless use of pronouns has any bearing on the actual marginalization of women in any way. I prefer to believe that women are at least as perceptive as my insensitive self to the actual attitudes of their peers, and just maybe not so much more emotionally fragile than myself either. ...


1

I'm sorry that you experienced "vote carpetbombing". I'm also sorry you ran into someone that apparently is annoyed by the fact that you corrected their grammar and spelling. Although, for some users (myself included) it's sometimes a bit of a jarring experience to come back to a question/answer and find that what you thought you typed, isn't there. ...


13

I was the only female in a combined comp sci/math class, with math being the primary listing. This was not the first time I had been the only female in a class, but this class was taught by a female professor. One day our professor came in and said that another professor had asked her about how her "comp sci guys" were doing in this class. She went on to ...


4

In my humble opinion, since the answer-ers are spending their time and effort to help the OP solve the issue with no pay, if the gender is not apparent then the OP should not be offended by the misused "him" or "her". People don't actually care if they are helped by a male or a female, a good answer is a good answer. As such, we shouldn't make much of ...


10

Personally, in doubt, I use the female pronoun. Not being a native speaker, the reason is not one of linguistic, but simply that given the choice between: using a male pronoun, and making our field a bit more grating for girls/women using a female pronoun, and having guys wondering why I would do that I preferred the latter. The underlying belief, of ...


-6

It's not the problem with the language, that forces to distinguish between male and female. It's the problem with the distinguishing language + the environment, that makes that distinction hard or impossible. The languages has evolved in the environment where you always known who are you talking with. Don't blame the language for the problems you create. ...


7

Most of the time, pronouns can be avoided in technical writing by not referring to the person but to the answer that the person provided. Writing something like "I like his answer" or "I found her idea very innovative" works just as well as "I like this answer" or "I like the answer provided by User1234", and "I found the User1234's answer innovative" and ...


42

I no longer work at Stack Exchange and I have no special authority here (other than honorary moderator for life status) but speaking personally as an original co-founder this email is completely unacceptable behavior from that person. Since the email directly and specifically references your Stack Overflow activity, I personally would consider this a Stack ...


7

The easiest way to avoid the gender issue in writing — and especially in technical writing — is not to use made-up pronouns (zer? really?) and not to torque existing pronouns into improper usage: it is to write in the plural voice. Instead of something like this, written in the 3rd person singular: A developer ought to take care that his code ...


8

With a bit a practice it will become second nature to write text where one does not assume a gender. Personally I prefer them/their as I find it rather polite to refer to some one in plural and it's gender neutral, win-win. If nothing else it shows consideration for not wanting to offend your readers, which is always a plus in my book. Another way is to ...


-25

How about SO allows users to specify their gender and displays their username in an appropriate colour? Would solve the problem for those that care and could be ignored by those that don't (no choice made - display in green...)


24

I wouldn't say that it's difficult to avoid using gender-specific pronouns, but it does require conscious effort. Interestingly, I find that I write better when I'm consciously trying to avoid them than I would otherwise, most likely because I'm paying sentence structure and communicating my ideas an equal amount of attention. Ask a writer when you should ...


30

Patricia already pointed out a "new pronoun" uniquely available to us modern users of Internet media such as forums and Q&A sites: In the specific context of referring to the person who asked a question on SO or who started a thread on USENET, I treat "OP" as though it were a pronoun. You could also expand "OP" to "original poster" for users who ...


197

As I indicated in a comment on another answer, I think this does matter. At 65, 44 years after I committed to programming as a career, and about 47 years after I wrote my first programs, nobody is going to put me off computer science by referring to me as a man. Also, at my age, I can afford to openly use a presumably-female given name on technical fora ...


11

When possible, I dodge the bullet: As User1234 pointed out in [this answer](link here)... If I have to, I usually just assume "male unless proven otherwise" and use "him". If it's a female and she cares enough she will put a comment and I will happily change to "her".


3

Every study shows that women are more likely to attract this kind of thing on the internet, including a study where the researchers made up nicknames and posts, and monitored the responses. You might consider changing your profile from female to neutral-sounding, to avoid attracting trolls. Please don't take this as a criticism, by the way - everyone has ...


34

Someone sent this to you in personal e-mail: Get a life you stupid bitch, besides correcting grammar on websites seriously I think you could find a better use for your time. Any discussion past how abusive & B.S. that is is truly irrelevant. The reality is this is abuse. And it should not stop you from editing someone else’s posts. There is a ...


30

I'm really sorry to hear that someone would send you something like that. It's a shame, really - I don't know why they would bother spending their precious time telling others how to spend their precious time. That said, while harassment isn't OK by any means, contacting Stack Exchange may only get the user punished if they're part of the network. If ...


111

Whoever wrote that email is being a jerk. You are doing the community a favor by making information more readable for everyone, and that is valuable work. Thank you for doing it! The vast majority of users do appreciate grammar and readability corrections (and the upvotes and better answers that will come to good questions); especially the non-native ...


1

For reasons discussed in the comments and other answers, I don't think blocking "thanks" comments is worth it. But we can still use these comments as user-education opportunities. When a user posts a "thanks" comment and hasn't upvoted the question/answer, they should be prompted to do so. If they're the querent and thanked an answer, they should be ...


27

We get dozens of emails each week asking if there's some way to contact a user privately, this is (basically) the reply that we give to these people: If users wish to be contacted off the site, they'll generally leave some method of doing so in their profile, or a link to a web site that has their contact information. If they haven't done this, then they ...


95

woah woah woah.... Baileys and Kahlúa? Trust me, slip some vodka and milk into that and you have yourself a damn fine drink. Mud Slide Equal parts of the Baileys, Kahlúa and vodka mixed about two parts of milk, slip a bit of ice in if you fancy it. Fair warning, this very easygoing drink. yes, this is a real answer: what you do is tell them straight, they ...


3

I found these comments on Thank you comments should be deemed “not constructive” pretty much like work on your accept rate comments: "Just to add some hard numbers, the amount of comments that are just 'thank you' is quite small." — gunr2171 154,369 "Thank You" comments / 30,325,243 total comments * 100% = 0.5% "Thank You" comments "I would only ...


2

usumoio's comment in your screenshot was more than just "thanks". It gave specific feedback about the quality and relevance of that person's answer. And the upvotes reinforced that opinion. To me as a reader, that is useful information. I would hate to see a comment like that blocked just because it contained the word "thanks". Getting rid of pure ...


2

Granted this is a site for programming, but why do we need to over-engineer every little thing that annoys us. I'm come to realize that we don't need a software solution for every little annoying problem because software can't think, it only knows what we tell it, so you have too many false positives and less than 100% success due to intentionally ...


62

I would simply reply that I normally charge $$$$/hour for tech support in office hours and $$$$$$$$$/hour for out of hours with a minimum charge of 4 hours as he doesn't have a support contract could he please supply his credit card number and a bank reference. Bet he would have hung up rather quickly!


4

The trouble with joke comments is that they might be funny at the moment, for a moment, but they don't usually add lasting value. Adding a joke or lighthearted comment can serve an important purpose -- it can make someone feel like they're among friends, provide encouragement, or counteract an unnecessarily negative comment or answer. But these are usually ...


61

I suppose there's a gap here - I'm not entirely sure how they got your contact information, credentials, or how they were able to successfully link it to you personally, lesson learned: don't leave contact info online, but I'm of the opinion that you did the right thing. You are not obligated to accept any third-party form of communication about a question ...


-2

Don't remove SHORT social fluff ... Remove long-winded crap like "After being out of programming for ten years I've started at a community college and..." But DON'T remove social salutations and moderate (SHORT) bridging social English. Fragments like this are fine and should be left alone: Cheers. Hey Xpress experts,. Any ideas. Here's a puzzler. ...


42

There is a place for tongue-in-cheek humor on Stack Overflow, but it takes quite a bit of finesse to pull it off. The comment has to be something informative, something of value that could conceivably influence an edit to improve the post, just delivered in a comical way. Most attempts at this that folks make will fail; either the comment will be ...


2

Don't add purely joke comments to posts on Stack Overflow Part of what makes Stack Overflow such a great resource is that it optimizes for signal over noise. Any comment that adds no value to helping to clarify or solve the problem in the question is just noise that drowns out valuable signal. So the short answer is, no, you should not add comments to ...


-4

when you remove "fluff" such as "please can you help me with..." or "thanks in advance" from a question all I see as an askee is that my carefully worded question has been messed with, from then on how can I be sure that you've not modified some crucial keypoint of the question? and when I revisit my question 12 months from now can I still trust its ...


0

Are we turning into robots? Please let people thank, before it turns into convenience that nobody will be thankful or be polite to anyone, and expect that you will answer because it's nothing less than what you should do, anywhere, including outside here. I agree that other kind of things can be considered 'noise', but politeness is not useless, and it ...


3

If you're already editing for other reasons, feel free to remove the greetings, thanks, etc. They're just there mostly because someone wanted to be polite, and doesn't realize how much we value getting to the point. But personally, I typically don't edit a post just to remove them (unless they're like half the question). And unless the post is otherwise ...


19

Define fluff. Your examples are not something that calls for an edit. A post needs some text to hold it together. What's considered as necessary and what's considered as superfluous is very subjective. Edits need to be substantial and address several issues. As a rule of thumb, consider whether the specific edit you are about to do is substantial enough on ...


5

Yes, please remove them! Furthermore, I usually remove introductory sentences like: "I am totally new to ...", "I have no clue about..." or "This is extremely urgent! PLEASE HELP!!!!!". P.S: Yes 'fluff' is an appropriate designation. I used to call it boilerplate text in my comments. P.P.S: If the question is really crap (i.e. not salvageable), just ...


3

I would say (it's something I do anyway) that a simple "Thanks" at the end of a post isn't too bad. I know it's a Q&A site, but you do have to think that people, even just by reading your question, are actively looking to help you with your problem and so I like to thank them for their time in doing so. Probably me being a little too British ;). ...


39

Yes, as Oded mentioned, you should remove fluff. However, with regard to: Can you help me with this? Many people see it as a requirement that the question must contain a question (i.e. a sentence ending with "?"). If the above is the only question in the post, it's often better to leave it there, although it's even better to replace it with a more ...


140

Yes, absolutely remove such things. Anything that is not relevant to the question/post is noise and should be removed. That includes salutations, signatures, 'thanks' and the kind of content you have highlighted.



Top 50 recent answers are included