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3

Just comment -- I think your comment was fine. I wouldn't bold the whole comment, since I wouldn't presume that my comment is the only one people should really be paying attention to. If the comment is good and the question is well-read then the comment will get upvotes (and in this case did). Upvoting is Stack Exchange's mechanism for highlighting whole ...


5

If you know a friend that could offer a bounty, sure, ask them (assuming you don't start voting for each other). At 20 reputation, you can also get into chat where you might be able to ask about it and maybe run across someone who might be willing to offer a bounty (I wouldn't explicitly ask for a bounty, though). If you mean coming to Meta and posting a ...


29

The most common case of this would probably be people new to PHP trying to store user input in a database, or query a database based on user input. It's a very frightening tag, to say the least. You should definitely point out the problem, but try to use a degree of finesse when you do. Some of the top users in PHP have gotten to the point that they burned ...


86

A lot of people would either leave bold comments pointing out the security issue, or include mentioning the security issue as part of an answer to the question. If you spot a security issue, you should try to point it out, if you have time to do so. It would be irresponsible not to, because not only do you let the original poster walk off with vulnerable ...


10

No - please don't solicit requests for help Stack Overflow for your personal projects. The community is willing to help you with a specific problem, but asking for another coder on your pet projects wouldn't be considered a constructive question. If you have a specific question about something that you're developing, then feel encouraged to ask. Asking ...


22

Editing other people's answers is a complicated subject, and there are various stances about how to go about it, and whether it's even appropriate at all: Good question, old version-dependent answer Is it OK to edit answers to show that they are obsolete, out-of-date, and deprecated? How do I deal with answers that are good for experienced users but ...


3

If your Answer is wrong, and you don't think that it is the right thing to try to improve it, then I suggest that you do the following: Edit it to make it clear that you think it is wrong. If the OP doesn't "unaccept" after a suitable period, then flag it for moderator attention, asking them to to delete it for you. (I have done this once or twice for my ...


32

As Shog9 Pointed out: Well... The alternative is to not improve the accepted answer, right? That's no good. Copying other answers verbatim is pretty dodgy. That said, if you're gonna do it you gotta do it right: name the author, include a link, clearly indicate what was copied. See: http://stackoverflow.com/help/referencing


8

If you are the author of the wrong answer that was accepted, fix it one way or another. If you realise you've made a complete mistake (which can happen to anyone) and there's a better answer, it's probably a good idea to delete your answer. Perhaps leave a comment to the asker to indicate you were wrong (I'm not sure they would be notified of a deleted ...


28

Well... The alternative is to not improve the accepted answer, right? That's no good. Copying other answers verbatim is pretty dodgy. That said, if you're gonna do it you gotta do it right: name the author, include a link, clearly indicate what was copied. See: http://stackoverflow.com/help/referencing I've further edited that answer to conform with these ...


14

Post an answer with the correct information and a detailed explanation of the circumstances. Whether you unmark the other guy's answer or not is up to you. The impact on the original poster will be minimal. I'd personally prefer that the correct answer be accepted.


3

Stack Overflow was never a library Is that what we aspire to? Absolutely, especially with posts like this one. But that's never going to happen on Stack Overflow organically. It requires users like these who are willing to spend their time contributing high-quality content. Let's face it: most of us are not up for that. What Stack Overflow is (mostly) ...


2

I am female, I don't deny my femininity in real life, but I am going to carry on using "he" because (a) 9/10 programmers are male so it is more likely to be accurate and (b) "he" has been used as a neutral pronoun for centuries anyway, so there is plenty of precedent for this being correct. There is really no point in anyone getting concerned about a ...


-5

How about another take on all this. Why don't we just put a Male or Female choice for SO profiles? And have them display next to the name. Like the arrow one for male and Egyptian cross looking thing for female? That way there's much more transparency and everyone can easily respect each other. It's so much nicer to refer to someone as [he] or [she] AND ...


3

I've come across this problem fairly frequently throughout my career. The following rules of thumb have worked well for me: If you know for certain the gender of the person, then use the appropriate pronouns. If it is easy to avoid the use of the pronouns without making the content harder to read, then avoid using the gender specific pronouns entirely. If ...


-2

This is ridiculous. If i refer to a user as "he", but the user is actually a "she", and said user becomes offended, that is the user making nothing into an issue. When a gender is not known, it is perfectly normal to say "he". This is common in human language. It is human nature. Personally, i sometimes refer to uers as he/she. I think this is more than ...


-1

Disclaimer: I am not a woman, nor do I believe for a moment that careless use of pronouns has any bearing on the actual marginalization of women in any way. I prefer to believe that women are at least as perceptive as my insensitive self to the actual attitudes of their peers, and just maybe not so much more emotionally fragile than myself either. ...


2

I'm sorry that you experienced "vote carpetbombing". I'm also sorry you ran into someone that apparently is annoyed by the fact that you corrected their grammar and spelling. Although, for some users (myself included) it's sometimes a bit of a jarring experience to come back to a question/answer and find that what you thought you typed, isn't there. ...


13

I was the only female in a combined comp sci/math class, with math being the primary listing. This was not the first time I had been the only female in a class, but this class was taught by a female professor. One day our professor came in and said that another professor had asked her about how her "comp sci guys" were doing in this class. She went on to ...


4

In my humble opinion, since the answer-ers are spending their time and effort to help the OP solve the issue with no pay, if the gender is not apparent then the OP should not be offended by the misused "him" or "her". People don't actually care if they are helped by a male or a female, a good answer is a good answer. As such, we shouldn't make much of ...


10

Personally, in doubt, I use the female pronoun. Not being a native speaker, the reason is not one of linguistic, but simply that given the choice between: using a male pronoun, and making our field a bit more grating for girls/women using a female pronoun, and having guys wondering why I would do that I preferred the latter. The underlying belief, of ...


-7

It's not the problem with the language, that forces to distinguish between male and female. It's the problem with the distinguishing language + the environment, that makes that distinction hard or impossible. The languages has evolved in the environment where you always known who are you talking with. Don't blame the language for the problems you create. ...


7

Most of the time, pronouns can be avoided in technical writing by not referring to the person but to the answer that the person provided. Writing something like "I like his answer" or "I found her idea very innovative" works just as well as "I like this answer" or "I like the answer provided by User1234", and "I found the User1234's answer innovative" and ...


51

I no longer work at Stack Exchange and I have no special authority here (other than honorary moderator for life status) but speaking personally as an original co-founder this email is completely unacceptable behavior from that person. Since the email directly and specifically references your Stack Overflow activity, I personally would consider this a Stack ...


7

The easiest way to avoid the gender issue in writing — and especially in technical writing — is not to use made-up pronouns (zer? really?) and not to torque existing pronouns into improper usage: it is to write in the plural voice. Instead of something like this, written in the 3rd person singular: A developer ought to take care that his code ...


8

With a bit a practice it will become second nature to write text where one does not assume a gender. Personally I prefer them/their as I find it rather polite to refer to some one in plural and it's gender neutral, win-win. If nothing else it shows consideration for not wanting to offend your readers, which is always a plus in my book. Another way is to ...


-25

How about SO allows users to specify their gender and displays their username in an appropriate colour? Would solve the problem for those that care and could be ignored by those that don't (no choice made - display in green...)


25

I wouldn't say that it's difficult to avoid using gender-specific pronouns, but it does require conscious effort. Interestingly, I find that I write better when I'm consciously trying to avoid them than I would otherwise, most likely because I'm paying sentence structure and communicating my ideas an equal amount of attention. Ask a writer when you should ...


31

Patricia already pointed out a "new pronoun" uniquely available to us modern users of Internet media such as forums and Q&A sites: In the specific context of referring to the person who asked a question on SO or who started a thread on USENET, I treat "OP" as though it were a pronoun. You could also expand "OP" to "original poster" for users who ...


199

As I indicated in a comment on another answer, I think this does matter. At 65, 44 years after I committed to programming as a career, and about 47 years after I wrote my first programs, nobody is going to put me off computer science by referring to me as a man. Also, at my age, I can afford to openly use a presumably-female given name on technical fora ...


12

When possible, I dodge the bullet: As User1234 pointed out in [this answer](link here)... If I have to, I usually just assume "male unless proven otherwise" and use "him". If it's a female and she cares enough she will put a comment and I will happily change to "her".


2

Every study shows that women are more likely to attract this kind of thing on the internet, including a study where the researchers made up nicknames and posts, and monitored the responses. You might consider changing your profile from female to neutral-sounding, to avoid attracting trolls. Please don't take this as a criticism, by the way - everyone has ...


36

Someone sent this to you in personal e-mail: Get a life you stupid bitch, besides correcting grammar on websites seriously I think you could find a better use for your time. Any discussion past how abusive & B.S. that is is truly irrelevant. The reality is this is abuse. And it should not stop you from editing someone else’s posts. There is a ...


30

I'm really sorry to hear that someone would send you something like that. It's a shame, really - I don't know why they would bother spending their precious time telling others how to spend their precious time. That said, while harassment isn't OK by any means, contacting Stack Exchange may only get the user punished if they're part of the network. If ...


114

Whoever wrote that email is being a jerk. You are doing the community a favor by making information more readable for everyone, and that is valuable work. Thank you for doing it! The vast majority of users do appreciate grammar and readability corrections (and the upvotes and better answers that will come to good questions); especially the non-native ...



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