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21

Yes, it is fine to edit. As Flexo has mentioned, make sure the license on the code allows it. However, I would suggest an additional action when you perform such edit: add a comment for the author that in its initial form the post could have been taken as spam. When I've left such comments, I've usually received a positive response. (I see you did leave a ...


61

I'd say that's perfectly reasonable (provided you're sure about the license terms, since you're effectively posting it as Creative Commons) and a very helpful way to resolve a poor answer. I sometimes wish more users would fix problematic posts rather than instantly resort to a moderator bat signal to delete because community actions/edits scale compared to ...


2

We do ask that suggested edits be substantial, because it does require the time and effort of several reviewers to evaluate them. Your first example doesn't seem like it would meet the six-character minimum requirement for a suggested edit. Your second example is an invalid edit; Title Case is Perfectly Acceptable in a Title.


2

Generally, we don't touch other peoples' codes. If there is something wrong with the answer you have a few options; If you wish to improve the code (it's better to) consider leaving a comment under the answer explaining what is wrong and why and how it should be improved. If the author of the answer agrees with you he will most likely improve his answer. If ...


6

Yes, one letter edits can be important, but there is a very good reason for the 6-character limit. It prevents too many minor edits from new users who may not understand that every edit bumps the post back to the front page. Users watch the front page looking for good questions to answer. A lot of questions get posted every minute, and finding a good ...


1

It is about quality not quantity when it comes to edits. You can make as many changes as you want, but that doesn't mean the edit will substantially improve the post. However, you could make only one change, but it would have a far greater impact. For example, I was trying to make a one letter edit on a question, in which case you would be able to ...


6

My activity was wrong because: I havn't done enough research before starting this mass edit I wasted so much precious time of several super users. My last edits were quick and uncautious. I corrected only tag and link. I haven't checked for other errors. When I spotted first rejections I should stop editing. Instead I sped up. My activity was not wrong ...


-2

I must say that the quality of the question is probably the first most important factor. At least from a learning perspective as this site seems to target. After more than 30 years in this industry, code collaboration is more prevalent than ever. Perhaps not complete sharing on all projects, but certainly in design. If the context of the question begs for ...


3

You can find the suggested edits for your posts in SEDE in this query select p.id as [Post Link] , s.owneruserid as [User Link] , s.id as [Suggested Edit Link] , s.comment , s.creationdate , s.approvaldate , s.rejectiondate , vt.name , v.userid as [User Link] from posts p inner join suggestededits s on s.postid = p.id inner join suggestededitvotes v on ...


1

There are three points I would like to make from the point of view of an editor: The first is that every edit should actually make the post better. When I edit, if the only thing I could change would to be make a link look nicer, I would not even bother. Edits are not suppose to be just a way to gain reputation. The only reason someone should edit is if the ...


9

Yes, the mass edits are considered abusive to the reviewers. Firstly, I would like to point to you that every reviewer only deals with at most 20 tasks every day (when the queue < 1k items, which it is), so when you put everyone through lots of your edits, the pool of robo-reviewers will be cleared, which is not good for massive retagging. Plus, you're ...


5

Postulates: A good question is better than a poor question A poor question without an mcve can be improved by adding code that fits the error generated The OP of a question can always fix incorrect modifications to the question (possibly replacing code previously added with their own) Given these, if the error is well enough defined and if someone is ...


28

I think that they should not have added code into the question that was not written by the OP. Doing so can be confusing to others, who might think that this is the actual code the OP is using, when it's not. So basically, never create code to add to the question. If the OP provided a JSFiddle or pastebin or whatever link with their code, it might be ...


-4

If the edit makes the question a good one instead of a bad one and doesn't conflict with OP's original intent, it's a good edit.


4

They look suspiciously like spam, but even if they're not: This edit fails to make the post even a little bit easier to read, easier to find, more accurate or more accessible. Changes are either completely superfluous or actively harm readability.


20

As others have said, greetings and salutations on posts are considered noise and typically are removed - so I understand why that was removed. However, the post is 5 years old and the removal, IMO, was not critical and they removed your data from the question - which doesn't seem at all appropriate since it changes your question. I've rollback the edit ...


4

There was nothing per se wrong with your edit. In fact, it was even a good edit. The problem was with your summary. You only mentioned fixing the table format. Most editors, if they see big changes like that, without a clear description of why they improve the post, will reject it as being too drastic a change. Next time, if you want to do that, mention ...


2

If and when you see the need and feel the urge, edit. That's how quickly. Anything else is just unmanageable hand-wringing. Where appropriate, add a comment to educate the OP, with an intimation to DIY next time e.g. Please format your code as code using the curly brace {} button. Did it for you this time.


7

I find that the original poster often doesn't notice / care about / know how to fix simple formatting errors. Remember that the preview of the question shows up as you enter it... so you would assume a person doesn't wait until after they have submitted their post to say "oh dear I didn't use code blocks. I better go in and fix that". They just don't know. ...


15

As a philosophical matter, there's no reason at all to wait -- the poster had all the time in the world before publishing to preview the post; the version that appears should be what she intended to share. Practically speaking, of course, in the real world, we all make mistakes. I usually like to give the poster the full five-minute grace period before I ...


15

You're free to do whatever you want. If you want to edit the post immediately, that's fine. If you want to wait a bit and then edit, that's also fine. If you want to not bother editing, that's fine.


2

I would think less about the author/reputation and more about the question. Do you want people to see this question (in search results, for instance) and regard it as a quality question? If so, you should upvote it.


2

If you have the reputation to downvote questions, downvote questions that you think deserve to be downvoted. Read the hover text of the downvote button for guidance. Yes, downvoting is helpful. It helps people by signalling which questions are not worth looking at. It can make a very bad question eligable for deletion. As another answerer mentions, ...


2

I found these two links in another meta post earlier today: My Rejected Edits My Accepted Edits You'll need to enter your user id in the field at the bottom of the post and then hit run query.


3

My strategy on edge case (no more editable) comments, is to open the edit (as long it's still possible, within the 5min lock period) improve my stuff take a copy of everything to clipboard Then I try to post my edits, if it's too late, I'm going to cancel edit, remove the former comment, and add a new one with my comments text restored from the ...


17

As always, vote on the question and not the history. Aside from your edit being there as opposed to someone else's, people don't go and click 'history' and read all that before voting on it. The value of the vote drives a number of other aspects to the system. Yes, it influences question and answer bans. Yes, it gives and takes away rep from the person ...


71

I've done this many times - I think it's important to vote on the content as it appears, not as it was. As a side bonus, if the author rolls back your edit you can then downvote, causing a rather dramatic change to the score immediately if the post warrants it. And by the way, I'm not saying that because I think it's great to be able to hold a big axe ...


16

If the question as it currently is is useful and clear, then feel free to upvote. It's your vote after all. It's fine even if it was you who made it upvote-worthy.


15

I'm the author of the userscript mentioned by @Scimonster. I've spend a few hours trying to get the script working, but no luck. I've put the script online here, so if you can get it working, please do.


7

You could run a query through data.stackexchange.com. For example, the query: SELECT 'site://suggested-edits/'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,id)+'|Suggested Edit #'+CONVERT(VARCHAR,id) [Suggested Edit Link], PostId as [Post Link], Comment, CreationDate, CASE WHEN ApprovalDate IS NOT NULL THEN 'Approved' WHEN RejectionDate IS NOT NULL THEN 'Rejected' ...


25

Eh? I wish I could accidentally or intentionally overwrite someone else's edit! I do get a notification saying that someone else has edited whatever I am editing. It also (sometimes?) says that my edit "must be more substantive than the other edit to override" or something to that effect. My edits in such situations usually are pretty extensive, and ...


3

Questions and answers are the bread and butter of Stack Overflow. At the end of the day, everything revolves around quality questions with expert answers. One of the things we strive for is a high signal-to-noise ratio. It's the most important metric we have, even if it isn't exactly quantifiable as a metric... We want to trust that if we go to a series of ...


22

There used to be a userscript on Stack Apps to do this, but the link died and the author hasn't put it back up. If anyone wants to track them down and ask them to rehost it, that would be nice.


4

What you do after your question is answered is important as well. When you get an answer: select it if that's the correct one vote for it if appropriate comment on it if that's not helping - explaining why Ignoring people who took time to help you out is the worst you can do. Once your issue is resolved, you can also edit your original question adding ...


6

I've asked myself that many times in the past, especially when new to one of the sites. Now that I'm 58k+ on the stack exchange network I can reflect on my experience. So, the best answer I have found is actually just to practice your craft and see what questions arise and what newly learned knowledge can help you provide answers to others and to pose good ...


11

As a newcomer, your options are limited. Certain things get unlocked by reputation. However, there's very definitely ways of being helpful that aren't just answering: Editing questions for clarity/tags. Commenting on poor questions by obvious newbies steering them towards asking good questions. Finding/flagging duplicates. But as said - there's a ...


45

To ask a question is to be helpful (provided it is on topic, not a duplicate, etc.). I note you have accepted answers to all the questions you have asked – that is helpful (assuming they suited you!). Perhaps you should think of your contribution as applying good grammar, punctuation and spelling to what others would have liked to ask, but do not have the ...



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