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1

I don't really think so, this does however force you to think twice before you downvote something, is it really worth it? Also people don't just randomly downvote every answer on the site without any penalty.


4

The old question you linked to is so clearly written I can understand the entire question from its title: from list of integers, get number closest to a given value What's more, it's presumably something that many people have actually wanted to do, given that as of today it's received almost 12000 views. The fact that it's clearly titled will have ...


10

The sites standards have certainly changed over time; the post from 2012 would almost certainly not get 12 upvotes today! Its also not the "worst" old question out there. Yours wasn't great; or terrible. Sitting at -1 right now, your score reflects that. That said, the past isn't an excuse anyways, so to the actual question of "Is the bar too high?" I read ...


4

I do not agree with any of the solutions involving somehow making downvotes no longer anonymous and/or leading to flags. This is not because I want to keep on downvoting all the things (you can see from my profile that I do not), but because I do not think it would be beneficial, and really that topic has been beat to death. The other aspect though I can ...


9

You describe a problem, no doubt. It's a problem I've talked about before. The crux of the problem is this: Questions that are allowed are the same as day one, but the community now discourages questions that do not show research effort. The distinction is important enough to restate: You are allowed to ask questions that aren't welcome by the ...


1

The fact that your answer contains a syntax error certainly isn't helping.


24

You have given an answer, that though is a solution to the question, if used is actively harmful, in that it opens up the OP to security problems. As such, it was downvoted. That's absolutely right and fair. If I see an answer promoting bad practices, I will downvote it. So should you.


7

Don't worry, the script will catch these blatant serial votes... once it runs. As @bluefeet noted in her comment - these run nightly, not continually. If after 48 hours they have not been reversed, then take it to meta ;)


3

While some parts of handling vote fraud are automated, the main defense against any abuse of the voting system is manual intervention by moderators and SE employees. If people coordinate vote fraud on a larger scale, this will inevitably be detected at some point. And then you have an actual person investigating the situation in detail, not any automatic ...


-27

The prime reason this kind of things happens is because SO allows anybody to downvote without providing any rationale as to why they are downvoting a questions. This actually encourages irresponsible downvoting.


11

The chances of random different users doing the same thing within a minute are so astronomically low as to not even merit discussion. That's not really true. The odds of that happening to one specific (selected beforehand) user are astronomically low, but there are millions of users on Stack Overflow. The odds of it happening to someone are not as low. ...


6

First of all, the threshold is not made public, very much on purpose. We don't want malicious serial voters tune their voting to avoid detection. Moreover, there is more to serial voting detection than just a simple minimal-number-of-posts-voted-on. Previous voting behaviour between users appears to play a role, as well as other factors. Last but not ...


17

In general, for system-detected serial down-voting, we don't warn (as Martijn states). The system takes care of this, and we aren't notified that it has done so. However, if this serial voting is strong enough that it comes to our attention and is clearly targeted in a malicious fashion at someone else, we will warn users directly about this. We even have a ...


40

No, serial voters are not warned. Only if the voter down-voted answers and lost reputation (-1 per answer down voted) would they see a 'serial voting reversed' entry in their reputation log as the voters are undone. The system assumes good faith here, and doesn't go out of their way to warn serial voters. Plenty of people go around discovering low-quality ...


24

Let us consider the types of comments that this would allow for: -1 comment to avoid down vote. -SomeUser -1 comment to avoid down vote... because upvotes on other comments don't count. -OtherUser I like ponies. -Bob -1 I like ponies too. -Will Some deleted comment. -SnarkyUser F* This. -ObsceneUser (deleted by mod) The problem with ...


3

You voted down an answer. That costs you 1 reputation. No bug here. See How does "Reputation" work? on Meta Stack Exchange.


25

Any post, be it a question or an answer, should be up or down voted on its own merits. From the "Privileges - vote up" page in the help center: Whenever you encounter a question, answer or comment that you feel is especially useful, vote it up! The operative word here is "whenever". Context shouldn't matter: would it be wrong to downvote a bad answer ...


10

Oy vey. So, first off... Search! There are multiple previous questions regarding debugging jQuery events, including this immensely popular discussion. Now, it's entirely possible that those won't help you, either because you're trying to do something a bit different or because they're out-of-date - but either way, you can save folks a lot of time wondering ...


-4

Sometimes happens that a good question is moderator downvoted in a hurry, but after some time (typically months) interested users stumble upon your question (by searching on google a similar problem) and if your question is good it will be fairly upvoted. The worst situation is when your question is closed within days, as no one will be able to judge ...


11

Downvoting does cost x points. x is zero. status-complete!


-17

My opinion, downvoting should have a price. It's cruel what I'm saying, but birth is painful.


12

The down vote on your question came 1:07 after your post. That is not "just a few seconds". Questions tend to get seen quickly upon initial posting. And it took me about 15 seconds to read and understand your question. So, I wouldn't assume too much here.


16

Yes, users will "pre-judge" a question based on the title, all the time, every time. For example; if I see a title: "I hate StackOverflow" (this was literally a title a while ago); I will probably downvote/VTC right away. Similarly with "Why am I getting NullReferenceException". Most of this is just human nature; and when you consider the flood of ...


-3

If you want to get a job in the meta industry, a prospective employer might check your meta.stackoverflow reputation when considering your application.


-1

Its like an addiction, when I enter the site and see a green box indicating I earned some new points my brain gets some rewards, this joy makes it more eager to see this green box again and again. (the addiction process) At first months this addiction is high but after awhile it may decrease and you get satisfied with your current level of points and ...


1

It has a lot to do: FIRST it's a personal evaluation to know where you are know: are you still a noob that is not consider a developer yet? and still asking a basic questions and still can't give a mid-level answer? are you asking a more professional questions that can came from a real developer? are you asking a valuable questions that make a lot of ...


2

I feel I must be missing something here You are just missing the quality time in thinking about this. Make use of the time to provide quality answers, make useful edits, improvise etc. The points? Well, if you do what I said above, you need not worry about points. You would get them anyway! NOTE : If gaining points is the ONLY goal to participate, ...


1

Reputation points are one proxy for validation. We all want some recognition that our thoughts and ideas resonate with others. An up-vote signals that our idea was correct to some degree. Just as responses to your question validate the question itself. (If you thought that posting your question would solicit nothing but silence, why put the effort in ...


14

I assume that the downvote came before your first revision. That version of the question didn't show much research effort, it just posed the problem. Maybe the voter will reconsider the downvote after seeing your revisions, but if not, relax, move on. Voting behavior (both ways) can be incomprehensible anyway. Maybe a lesson for next time: show what you ...


1

No, do not downvote, just edit it.


1

Just some addition to all the great answers pointing out privileges and public display of competence and merit: SO relies heavily on sorting of questions and above all of answers by public voting. Obviously higher voted answers will be regarded with more goodwill and will be read first and probably more often. Therefore answerers care about the score and ...


2

I want to improve the site. I originally wanted enough rep to be able to submit edits. Then I wanted to be able to cast downvotes and participate in fixing the review queue. Now I am working towards the coveted "golden badger hammer" in one of the tags I'm active in. I see you already received a lot of good answers, but I didn't see this aspect covered ...


2

As a freelancer / contractor, reputation on a site which is as well known and respected as SO can translate into a real competitive edge when trying to edge out others on a new project or consulting opportunity. Although personally, I would try to provide links to a handful of specific samples of my answers which demonstrate a decent understanding on a ...


4

It seems to me that I am getting better answers now that my rep is not too low. Perhaps I am biased and that I simply have learnt to phrase my questions properly, but I can't help notice that very low rep users tend to be told to do their homeworks.. In short, my question simply gets read, and I get advice on how to improve it. Several others have mentioned ...


2

When I mention in my resume that I'm in the TOP 200 on Stack Overflow I expect them to at least invite me.


5

Some time ago I said to myself that I want to give something back to the community after years of "unpaid" usage of SO. So I started answering questions. But that was not enough. Especially at the beginning without all the necessary priviledges to really participate. So I wanted to reach at least 50 rep so I can comment everywhere. Then I saw 125 rep for ...


1

Personally I care a bit because you need reputation to start bounties. Using SO as a development tool, there are objective benefits to rep Starting bounties on questions that are important to you Privileges on SO. I rarely use these "similar question, close request, etc." Some employees allow you to submit your SO profile, and a high rep could help you in ...


131

I'd like to throw my hat in the ring on this question. Developers are not often thanked for the thing they want to be thanked for the most As developers we rarely get a direct thank you from anyone on figuring out a complex problem quickly. Business users rarely pat you on the back and tell you that your algorithm for determining the best way to compare ...


9

Why do people care about reputation points? Honestly, I don't know. Why do I care about reputation points ? My first motivation to get reputation points here was to put a bounty on my very first question. Now that I have enough rep to put huge bounties on many questions, I'm still interested by those imaginary internet points. Why? When I spend ...


19

Sense of achievement Yup, it's fun as hell to gain those points & badges. Competing with friends & family is great too. Gamification at it's best :) Privileges The more you invest, the more the site trusts you, the more you can do. Plain simple. CV for works I gained my 1k rep for fun, but believe it or not, it'll help you in your real life as ...


3

We like to feel useful in this uncertain world. Upvotes = usefulness.


5

Gaining those points has a couple of advantages. It is, of course, a great way to impress family, friends and co-workers. I mean, who hasn't bragged about their reputation to a random aunt at a birthday party? ;-) You get move privileges on the site, which is a good thing if you like to feel in control. You can see the amount of upvotes and downvotes, and ...


31

Get points, save the day, get the girl, profit. Isn't it obvious? I've got more rep than @Coffee, so I'm obviously cooler and smarter. William has a bit more rep than me, but I can catch up. Oded has more rep than I'll collect in a lifetime, so I'll either kiss his *** so I'm in the cool crowd or I'll rebel it out and find a way to put him down because I'm ...


4

IMO the main value of rep is so that I can give it away as bounties. Though I will admit it was a bit embarrassing when I got downvoted 11 times on apparently terrible question


1

I agree with everything Oded said. I think also, concept of gamification. This is human behavior - we like "achievements" and "points". We enjoy the reputation and good word of peers. From the beginning, Stack Overflow included gamification. You unlock privileges and earn badges.


98

Is there some advantage to having these points that I'm not aware of? Sure. The more reputation you have, the more you can participate in and moderate the site. Reputation is directly tied in to the privileges one can gain on the site. I feel I must be missing something here Given that downvotes indicate something wrong/bad in the post, yes, ...



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