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68

The answer is a Community Wiki, meaning that anyone is allowed and encouraged to edit the answer further. If the answer works, but is missing a warning, then edit the warning in. That's all there is to it. I would discourage referencing another answer or saying, "This is too dangerous, look over here", or anything of that sort; this answer has worked for ...


66

Questions asked on this site are expected to be of high quality. The fact that you answered it yourself is entirely irrelevant; questions will be evaluated in isolation. The question should be a good question even if you don't answer it yourself. A two sentence rough description of a project to be solved is a terrible question. What would you do if you ...


51

Yes, they will be notified. I've always been notified when people comment on my CW posts (such as my faq posts here on Meta) even though other people have edited the posts. (And yes, I was notified even before I became a moderator; that I now carry a diamond was not a factor).


43

The High Council of the Lounge has gathered, and approves of the Wiki Lock on the C++ book question. Well, only 3 of us. But the idea of the wiki lock seems very appropriate. I'll keep this answer pinned in the Lounge, so that any disapproval can be discussed in the comments here.


41

If the post had been a regular post is my initial reaction to reject the edit correct? Yes. Do/should we treat suggested edits to community wikis differently? Yes. The point of making a post CW is to say that it is no longer your post. Rather it is a collaboration of many people, and that the person who posted it is encouraging others to edit ...


24

The reason you would mark the answer as Community Wiki, for a canonical question, is not to stop the author from earning reputation, but rather to encourage and enable the community to edit the post, and to change its content with edits, instead of treating the post as content owned by the original author. If you don't want to do that with your answer, ...


24

I see no reason why this would be wrong. Community gave info, community receives info, community can continue to use and maintain info, community is happy. Also, Kudos for selflessly using wiki and your intentions being in the interests of the site. It is arguably fair to have nicked it, as the edit couldn't have been approved, and there is no "real" user ...


22

I don't personally have a problem with it. In exchange for avoiding downvotes, they're also giving up the possibility of receiving upvotes for those answers. If the answers are bad, users can still downvote them so they sink to the bottom, and flag/delete if appropriate.


20

Until recently auto-conversion to Community Wiki was intentional, as a form of rate-limiting (if you bump the post too often you won't get any more points). The (mis-)feature was eventually removed in April 2014. If you feel your edits were legitimate (not used to bump the post), flag it for moderator attention and request that the wiki status be removed. ...


20

The original theory behind triggering auto-CW at 30 answers was twofold: encourage folks to read and improve existing answers rather than adding yet another one in cases where the topic had been thoroughly covered already. remove reputation from the equation entirely for questions that were... uh, not really questions so much as discussions. We've kinda ...


19

I have had success the one and only time I flagged one of my own answers on Stack Overflow that had become CW due to automatic triggers (which were triggered by me). But as mentioned in the SE wiki these automatic triggers are no longer operational so it requires an act of clumsiness for a post to become CW unintentionally. In other words, don't flag it ...


19

the "safe" answer doesn't really attract votes, as it lacks explanations, and is a bit confusing I think it would be heavy-handed to edit other (non-community wiki) answers, but it's clearly OK for you to improve the "safe" answer. Add explanation, clean up confusion, etc. It doesn't deserve to be the top-voted answer if even its advocates think it's ...


17

Posting the answer in the first place Since they gave you permission, I'd say you're fine on this front. Strictly speaking, however, there are some things to consider: Does he own this content to begin with? Perhaps he recited it almost word-for-word from some resource which can't be shared on Stack Overflow without the author's explicit permission. ...


16

You can certainly self answer your own question. In fact you are encouraged to do so. However, the question and the answer must still adhere to the standards here. Meaning the question must be complete and thorough, describing the issue you are having and what you've attempted to overcome it. And the answer must be complete explaining the solution along with ...


14

The help center says the following: Additionally, community wiki posts show the editor with the highest percentage of the remaining post in the current version in the author field. So here's the breakdown of what those numbers mean. 29 revs This is the number of revisions the post has currently, similar to a normal non-wiki post. 8 users ...


13

A list of links to videos? Ugh. Why do we even need this? In general I'm not opposed to this idea. I've told many people to learn some debugging before coming back to the site with yet another question to be closed. Having somewhere I can bring them to that explains what that "debugging" thing is would be nice. I don't like this incarnation of it, though. ...


12

Answers are no longer automatically converted to Community Wiki, however many times you edit them. See Can we disable automatic community wiki conversion for answer edits? Instead, posts that have been edited more than 10 times by their author are automatically flagged for moderator attention. We'll then take a look if the edits were material, or were ...


11

I'd hazard a guess at: You didn't form it as a question There's not a specific thing you're trying to get an answer to (you're solving a programming task rather than trying to gain a specific piece of information) It duplicates material already on the site


11

Thanks for the heads-up, we have dealt with the user; they appeared to be trying to game the editing badges. In future, feel free to flag such a post for moderator intervention and explain that a user appears to be making loads of minor edits to CW posts, and we'll take a look if an intervention is needed.


10

The thing I don't like about this approach is that all the context about why to use one or the other item on the list is gone with the deleted answers. (I have enough rep to see them, but most users won't.) So for a newbie, all this question does is provide a list that is now less useful than googling. Personally, I'd like to read why someone is ...


9

Moderators can, but chances are they won't because you can still receive bounties on community wiki answers, so there's not much need for it, and they'll remember to be careful next time and not bother the mods.


8

The CW button on questions has been gone for a long long time now. I posted the exact same question 4 years ago: Community Wiki checkbox missing in action


8

No-one. The question-asker. More in the FAQ: What are "Community Wiki" posts? As to the edited, changed version of your question: Yes, I think it's fair. The question-asker has every right to flag their question and ask for the community-wiki flag to be removed. If a moderator finds sufficient evidence to support the removal, they will do so. ...


8

IANAL As per my view, as long as you're not stealing credit from another user here, I think you can post in directly from your account. No need for a community wiki there. Attribution, on the other hand is always welcome. Just for clarification, I don't attribute each and every answer to the author of a book from which I might have read and gained the ...


7

Any reputation earned on the answer prior to CW conversion is preserved.


7

As explained in an answer to similar question at MSE, A workaround to force Klingon diff display a major contributor as an author... is for the user to add then remove a dummy text with sufficient amount of line breaks: <!-- CW attribution algorithm work-around: See http://meta.stackexchange.com/questions/65541 Lorem ipsum dolor sit ...


7

Having been in this situation a couple of times from the other side, being the person who didn't want to create a Stack Overflow account, I can say you wouldn't be the first person to do this or that there's anything wrong with it. As far as attribution goes, since there's no expectation here that the ideas in answers be original, you only need to provide ...


6

It's a community wiki now, so you don't get any further reputation from the post. Given the nature of the post, I'm not inclined to remove the wiki either.


6

You can't. What you want the question to be is inherently, at a fundamental level, too broad. This site doesn't exist to support those types of questions. To make the question narrow enough to be appropriate would be to fundamentally create an entirely different question with little resemblance to what it is now.


6

I think it depends on whether you authored the question/answer from scratch, and if a different canonical (one that was posted by someone else) already exists. The ethical concern is that you are using your place in the community to create a situation in which reputation is funneled to your question rather than somewhere else. If a user who does not ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible