Tag Info

New answers tagged

-1

There's two small updates to comments that I think would make them a lot more user-friendly for editing, and reduce how often this error is shown to users: Hide the "edit" link client-side when the 5 minutes are up Allow 1 minute extra "grace period" for when the edit box is already open (just extend the edit duration to 6 minutes) There've been plenty ...


0

Said first...I think the current add, edit, delete abilities of comments are acceptable as is. To me, Questions & Answers are analogous to printed material and Comments are analogous to verbal speech. Quick edits and deletions Like spoken conversations, it seems quite logical that one would throw out a comment and fairly quickly amend that comment ...


27

You don't. Comments can be deleted without any notice since they are considered "second class citizens". Everything that is relevant on the long term should come in the question or answer, not in a comment. So move it into the post if it should be kept, if not, leave the comment and don't be surprised it gets deleted one day.


-4

In the long-term, comments don't matter. The fewer the comments, the cleaner questions and answers look. A question or answer should stand fully without reference to comments. If a comment is deleted, it should not affect the ability of the next search-enginer along to be able to find what they want. Comments are supposed to be "ephemeral". Relevant ...


-3

I think what the other answers did not address is the fact that if you delete and re-comment, your new comment lands at the bottom of the list of comments. This way, once a comment has been around for 5 minutes, it's locked in at its position in the list of comments. This behavior goes a long way to help ensure that responses will actually make sense. Why ...


2

There are a few users who frequent the Python tag who sometimes drop in on questions that they didn't answer, but did comment on, and if there's an unaccepted answer that got a "thanks" or that's just obviously right, suggest to the OP that he accept the answer (with a link to the Help page on accepting). There's almost no way it can seem rude or greedy or ...


20

It's okay to post a polite comment a couple of days later. Make sure the tone is right, though. Pestering them for an accept is unlikely to actually achieve anything, plus it will make you look bad. It is, however, normal for many OPs not to react to responses, or to abandon their question altogether. You're going to have to live with that from time to ...


2

Is it okay after a few days to post a comment, asking the OP to either accept or give some feedback, if it did not solve the problem? Yes. You can comment and request the OP to accept an answer and also link the comment to a post such as this. You should, however , request the OP to accept any one of the answers instead of requesting the OP to accept ...


9

What you can do doesn't mean you should do. You should not delete and add a comment instead of an edit. If you had something to add/modify in your comment, and that you cannot edit it anymore, then add another comment and no need to delete your previous comment. Doing so would break the continuity, and might make the entire discussion meaningless. Imagine ...


28

After 5 minutes it is reasonable to believe that the OP of a question or answers that you are commenting on may have read your message and decided on a response. At least there is a small but realistic probability of that. At some point (arbitrarily set at 5 minutes by SO), edits to your comments risk more damage due to changing responses-in-progress than ...


49

At the core, both should serve a different purpose: edit should be used to fix a comment (typo, syntax, code correction, ...) delete should be used to remove an obsolete comment Using delete+add instead of edit is an abuse of the system and, at the very least, leads to difficult to read threads (when someone answered).


34

Wait for some time ( a few days as the answereer might have had urgent things that he needed to take care of, so couldn't edit the answer ), and if they still don't add the important parts in their answer, you can edit the answer. But please do not make drastic changes to the answer. If the edit requires a lot of changes, then it's better to post your own ...


2

Yeah, looks like the title wasn't updated during the change. Updated now, with you in the next build.


1

To be polite I first ask the OP if they mind if move the comment to the answer and ask them if they'll accept it there. Everyone has said yes, and accepted the answer posted right away. If you just move the response to the answer w/o any interaction with the poster they may not realize you've updated to an answer. I haven't deleted the dup comments ...


3

Yes you should answer it yourself and get the reward; otherwise it is open for someone else to post your answer as a community Wiki answer as described here: Question with no answers, but issue solved in the comments


7

Yes, you should post it as an answer. You should also remove your comment once the answer is posted as it is obsolete at that point. An answer is always better than a comment. It is easier for the original poster to see solutions. It is easier for future visitors to see solutions. Comments can be hidden if the comment thread gets long. Comments can be ...


5

If your comment is so long that it doesn't fit or has so much emphasised that it doesn't fit then I'd say that's a good indication that the comment shouldn't be posted. Comments, as we keep saying, are meant for transitory remarks to get clarification from the OP (which is edited into the post not left as a comment), point out errors in code, point out ...


55

You can escape square brackets with a leading backslash \, so: [AssocGetPerceivedType \[MSDN\]](https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/bb773463%28v=vs.85%29.aspx) becomes: AssocGetPerceivedType [MSDN] even in comments (see below).


16

Oh, look - you noticed! If you're paying enough attention to notice details like that, you can probably also read the question itself and pass the audit.


15

Was I right to edit the question? Yes. Your suggested edit was fine: it didn't change the original intent of the question it improved the content of the question it added additional information that the author has posted outside the question. However, your edit summary suggested that you actually added an answer into the question. Also, even though ...


0

I think my opinion would be that if you can positively identify redundant information, then getting rid of it would be no harm. Whilst I can see the point that a 'thanks' doesn't do much harm, and it's a 'nice' sort of a comment - and on that basis, I'd suggest leaving it. The point is - we do ask people not to do it, and we do get moderators picking up ...


8

To show appreciation to a user; Upvote their answer/question - this will show that you appreciate their answer and/or they post a high-quality question as per How to Ask Accept the answer - if you asked a question and someone gave a solution that helped you, you can always accept the answer (this will show appreciation without any need of "Thank you" ...


3

What I believe: I believe your idea is great; however, automating the deletion of the comments defeats the purpose of our community driven "society" where we "clean" up after each other. By reading the rules and then contributing brings us closer together and work more efficiently. I appreciate you posting that Data StackExchange showing us how "thank you" ...


11

That's perfectly acceptable, and that's one of the main reasons to use comments (instead of answers, which would get deleted).


1

Comments can use a scaled back version of Markdown. To use code formatting in a comment, utilize the backticks (`) around the code you want to format Example: This is a block of `code` formats to "This is a block of code" To use links, you do this utilize the format [display text](url) Example: [This is a link to comment ...


0

The answerer got it right, but posted what IMHO is a low quality answer. You can esaily open that link and look at the information provided about the topic, and see that the answer given is not really a complete one, and it lacks of foundamental content. The OP asked for the meaning of the bdata private word in variable's declarations, so a clear and ...


7

Comments aren't the focus of a Q&A site, save for clarification and/or suggestive guidance. That doesn't stop most of us from using them in other ways, but in all honesty, there's no reason to allow us to see our own deleted comments, as they'd add unnecessary noise to the overall context of a question and/or answer.


11

Both. You should edit your original question; you want all pertinent information in the question for people who come to the post later on. Then you can comment on the answer. Explain that you weren't 100% clear in your explanation and that you've revised the question. The answerer will get notified of your comment and likely come back to see what you wrote ...


1

Since the user profile page has been revamped, here's an updated image to show where to find this with the new layout:


4

When you get "An error occurred fetching comments", it's most likely that the post was already deleted when you click "show N more comments".


11

If we're only going to talk about high-reputation users, let's discuss the most common case where a high-reputation user's content would be flagged: they're being rude or getting into a fight with other users. Above certain reputation thresholds, we don't see a lot of behavior like sock puppetry (because we catch them before that), plagiarism, etc., but ...


16

I like the idea of giving people the opportunity to know they've crossed the line. The problem is there's too much opportunity for it to turn into a complaint session on Meta, and that's in the best of cases. I think it's a good idea for someone to know their comment was deleted. I like that idea. I also like the idea that users should have some sort of ...


2

A case-by-case basis is probably most appropriate but a good rule of thumb might be to include a sort of "standard disclaimer" like: The example code below demonstrates the intent; however, make sure to check for errors, cleanup resources, etc. This approach seems to combine the best of brevity in code example but also encouraging (diligent readers) to ...


2

I like to give two answers in these cases; an answer that directly answers their issue, and what the ideal answer should be. These answers are contained together, and usually I'll have a header that tells you which is which. Sometimes the OP just wants an answer, and that's fine, but we're not just helping out the OP, we're helping everyone who visits ...


8

There is no general rule. You'll need to evaluate, on a case by case basis, how much weight to grant to the brevity, clarity, completeness of any given post. You need to consider the context of the post to determine how likely readers of it are to be interested in brevity vs. completeness, how likely they are to be able to complete any given portion of an ...


2

I would always prefer to omit error handling and resource cleanup unless it's directly related to the question. We don't need to clutter questions with boilerplate stuff. Certain things need to be implied, rather than explicitly stated, or we wind up explicitly stating them in practically every answer. Yes, you should always check return values for errors. ...


1

[I'm the original commenter] My opinion is that full example code should at minimum have a comment of some sort. E.g. Instead of (Go example): value, _ := Func1() Func2(value) do: value, err := someFunc() // check err!! err = Func2(value) (in particular, if the reader doesn't go to the documentation, like they should, they may not even realize Func2 ...


8

That happens when you are that confrontational in comments. Nobody likes to be told that they are incapable of thinking. Or that there would be something wrong about improving a post by editing it. They are nonsensical accusations that only enrage the recipient. What happens next tends to be predictable. There is no obligation to explain downvotes, I ...


3

I think in cases like you describe it typically happens that answer would benefit from the edit that adds an extended explanation provided in comments. After all, since one reader found it unclear without such an explanation, it is possible that others will too. Such an edit would naturally unlock the vote, making it unnecessary to complicate system with an ...


3

There would be a significant amount of ramifications to this that in my opinion are not ideal. As clearly indicated above, users could simply leave non constructive comments to bypass the requirement. However, there is a true problem with forcing users to leave comments, which is that there would be too many comments. Some answers have literally thousands ...


7

As to contribute for the particular example you have left from "my courtesy" I'm putting the relevant screenshot (as the actual question is likely to be deleted, and cannot longer be seen by < 10K rep users): And repeating from my comment: I'm rarely leaving such comments as I've linked above, but when I'm doing so, I'm serious. That question doesn't ...


2

Comments and votes are decoupled because they solve different problems. Problem #1 is, which answer do you read/try first? Pretend you're an average, unregistered reader, coming here from Google. You see a question and some number of answers. Your time is valuable; where do you begin? Ideally, with the answer that best solves your problem. Voting ...


26

This is indeed a much bigger problem than comment-free downvotes, and I'm glad someone has finally decided to break the silence. For reference, here are stats for the past 90 days on comments when voting: Name PctCommented ------- ------------ UpMod 11.28 % DownMod 27.90 % That's the % of votes coupled with comments from the voter. ...



Top 50 recent answers are included