Hot answers tagged

45

You are welcome to downvote if you think the question doesn't show enough research effort or is generally not useful. You should not put the question on hold unless it fits one of the close reasons. See this extremely good writeup of that point: A Close Vote is not a Super Downvote As far as the thrust of your question, however... I have been in the OP's ...


28

As a fellow R tag follower, I am sympathetic to the situation. In the case of the specific question that precipitated the discussion, I would downvote, comment, and move on. The requested approach is tragically ill-advised. There is little learning benefit from the approach. It encourages useless coding that is at odds with the R language. With respect to ...


13

Okay, so there exist questions about how to best shoot oneself in the foot. But do they actually make the sites less useful? I believe the contrary. If people want to know how to do (bad practice) X, they should find the answer is "First, don't. It doesn't work because of Y. If you really want to do X, then at least mitigate the harm by doing Z". This is a ...


9

This is something that there is no general case solution to. It's something that each person will need to make an individualized decision about based on the specific context. Here are some factors to consider though: Is the bad practice universally inferior to another approach, or just often worse? For example, a given solution might be more powerful, ...


8

Special requirements (for instance: I cannot use X, that won't work) are allowed but must be stated in the question itself. A question where they aren't should either be edited to include them or put on hold until edited by OP to include them. The goal here is not to waste the time of contributors and future readers alike. People willing to answer cannot be ...


8

They're not closed because they don't meet any closure criteria. If you see an open question that you feel merits closure, then flag it for closure for the appropriate reason.


7

It sounds like you misunderstand the term's use here. "Closed" on Stack Exchange means "not answerable within the topical scope of the site". This can be because the question is simply not about the right subject matter, or because it's faulty in some way. "Closed" doesn't mean "solved", or "completed", or anything like that. So questions don't get closed ...


4

Part of the problem with "too localized" was that it was just too easy to apply to practically anything that wasn't asked very well. This is another example of that. I was able to make sense of the question, I edited it - it's a duplicate of about 100 other duplicates that probably duplicate 50 more respectively, but it wasn't too localized. The issue is, ...


4

I've only skimmed the question, and I am indeed ignorant of the ways of Pandas, but this stuck out: Is there a much simpler, faster way of doing this when the number of models gets into the many thousands? This says two things to me: "Faster" implies that it needs to be profiled "Simpler" is subjective in that this may be as simple as it can be, or ...


4

A lot can change, in a week, a month, a year. New technology or new insights can blow away previous answers by just being so much better. The question can still be very valid and useful to others. Why wouldn't we give the question asker and other viewers the ability to benefit from new answers, additional comments or edits that make the post better?


1

Unfortunately, the idea seems to be not to bother with old questions that aren't causing a problem. I personally don't like this because it creates bad audits and people complain here on meta. It would be better to be proactive. If you see a question that should be closed by today's standards, flag it (then close vote it after getting enough rep). Note ...



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