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66

Any time you find a broken link, you should attempt to fix it. If, in the process of fixing it, you find that the broken link appears systemically broken (like in this instance), do what you've done now and raise a meta post. That way, the community can reach out to the site in question and alert them to this issue. Do note that, once you reach 2000 ...


42

Thanks for putting in the time and effort to remove url shorteners from posts! I can certainly stand behind such efforts (do try to fix anything else wrong with a post while editing already). If you can find an alternative link (like to a Internet Archive copy), replace the broken link with one that works. If the post can stand on its own without the link, ...


40

I've found Microsoft links to be very unreliable over time. I just take it as a given that the link will die someday, and the same goes for any replacement you might make today. The best solution I've found is to put the title of the page as the link text, so that when the link itself goes dead there's a chance that Google can still find it.


38

In general don't flag it unless the answer is now meaningless. If you can't find the new link then a moderator isn't going to fare any better. Leave a comment and down-vote. That should get the answerer's attention. If the user no longer exists (the name is grey and not a link) then it might be worth flagging so we can delete the answer - but again only if ...


29

In general you can always try the Wayback Machine: (the image is a link to its homepage) Wikipedia: The Wayback Machine is a digital archive of the World Wide Web and other information on the Internet created by the Internet Archive, a non-profit organization, based in San Francisco, California. It was set up by Brewster Kahle and Bruce Gilliat, and ...


18

Since the answer is, as you say, pretty much link-only, it's probably not worth fixing since it won't solve the problem of having a bad post and in the end will just encourage the user to keep posting the link-only answers since they'll keep getting upvotes and rep. I'd say that the better solution would be to post another answer with the correct ...


14

My thoughts: If the answer is pretty much based on the link alone, then flag the post for moderator attention. If the answer is useful even without the link, just edit out the references to the said link. Optionally, comment on the answer informing the original author that the previous link is not working anymore; they might update the post with a ...


9

I don't think this is a good idea. For example: Q: Wee, code.google.com/chrome/extensions/ does not work anymore!!? A: code.google.com/chrome/extensions/ is deprecated!! No longer use it! After your transformation, this becomes Q: Wee, developer.chrome.com/extensions/ does not work anymore!!? A: developer.chrome.com/extensions/ is deprecated!! No ...


9

At first, try to assess whether the link is likely to come back. This is a difficult one, since it depends very much on the context. I seem to remember a medium size open source project having all its pages replaced with the default Apache Httpd page ("It works!!!" or something like that) for a few weeks, because the server had somehow crashed, just at the ...


8

If it was a link-only post and the link is dead, flag the answer for deletion, with a comment along the lines of "link-only answer and link has now died". It has no value at all any more. If any parts of the answer don't make sense any more, edit to remove them. Otherwise, just edit to remove the link. A comment of "removing dead link" in the edit ...


6

Someone got too clever with merges and migrations. The solution, as usual, is to delete everything. Done.


6

And that's exactly why link-only answers are such a bad idea/practice. The correct thing to do here is to take the (relevant) content from the deleted answer and put it in the currently visible answer. That way the information survives on its own rather than being dependent on the existence of another site. Having said that, this particular thread is ...


6

The problem is now solved by Google; they fixed the redirects. There is no need for an edit now, either manual or automated.


4

A quick workaround that works well for links (better than this) is to inline it: … with [realpath][1] or … [1]: http://de3.php.net/manual/en/function.realpath.php becomes … with [realpath](http://php.net/manual/en/function.realpath.php) or … What's the best thing to do here? Don't use a flag for this kind of stuff. Put a comment beneath that ...


4

Links are working as expected again. VTC as no-repro, although the issue did exist at the time. Note: A tweet to @msdn was answered the day it was made, Feb 17. Got another reply today (Feb 23) about no repro status on the issue. So, in case this crops up again, pull out the stick and poke the beast. They'll get back to you on it.


2

Just removing a dead link does not really improve a post. It arguably makes it worse, as the notice that there was something more is gone. The proper thing to do when you notice dead links, depending on circumstances, is one of: Notify the author with a comment. Replace it with a link to an archived version, or another link to an equivalent source. ...


2

Thanks for letting us know. I've updated the blog post with the correct link.


1

If you use the proper markdown (insert a link using the toolbar) it shouldn't be an issue: link to documentation https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/service/$q Bare Url (enclosed in angle brackets): https://docs.angularjs.org/api/ng/service/$q Advice from SO Markdown Editing Help: (emphasis mine) We have modified our Markdown parser to support "naked" ...



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