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5

I can't tell you how subsequent activity would be received. I can say that the community is known to afford a certain amount of latitude to those that are great contributors in many areas, and where the perceived intent of the person posting is apparently benign. As long as your answers are self-contained and don't present quality issues - the community ...


8

If it feels wrong, don't do it. Of course, your work might be fantastic - it might actually be a very good idea to link it in your answers. I wouldn't blame you, as long as you don't regard your library as more than it is, and your answers contain substance as well. But if it changes your way of doing, if you start to accept low-quality questions because ...


1

The fact that information is easily available elsewhere isn't alone a reason for something to be off-topic for Stack Overflow. Stack Overflow is supposed to be a repository of questions and answers: If someone is able to write a good, clear, on-topic question that hasn't already been asked on Stack Overflow, and can illustrate that they made a reasonable ...


7

Personally, I'd say that the linked answer offers an alternate solution that will involve enough code rewriting that the Exception will be moot (and fixed by preventing its occurrence). It's like this situation: Q: How can I rewire my device to turn on when my batteries are backwards? A: You should really put the batteries in their correct ...


3

No, you should not be adding entirely new content to another user's answer. You can post your own answer (attributing appropriately if you are building on another user's content) if you have your own original content to add. Alternatively you could comment on their post asking them to add additional information if you feel that it is lacking, to which they ...


35

I think that when someone asks an incredibly open ended question like "Why is my code crashing?", it's equally fine to answer with an open ended answer giving instructions on how to debug. But that doesn't really help anyone, we end up with a low value answer on a low value question. For review purposes, this is an answer but not a good quality one (you do ...


1

IMO you should post it as an answer because it provides valuable information about the solution (that it doesn't exist). I have seen such answers and they are upvoted by the community. I suppose comments are for asking more details about the question.


0

Users answering old questions typically get very little love both from the asker (who probably disappeared) and from other upvoters (who either don't care – or they would have answered – or don't see the updates at all). IMHO such altruists should get some incentives, like a gold badge for revival/necromancer pattern (which I proposed to call Persephone). ...


34

Wait for some time ( a few days as the answereer might have had urgent things that he needed to take care of, so couldn't edit the answer ), and if they still don't add the important parts in their answer, you can edit the answer. But please do not make drastic changes to the answer. If the edit requires a lot of changes, then it's better to post your own ...


12

Good grief. I encourage you to take some time off from Stack Overflow, appreciate the rest of life, and let this pass. It sounds like you are feeling strong emotions. I think those might be clouding your judgement a bit. There's a lot more to life than some silly website (and as much as I respect and appreciate StackOverflow, let's face it, it's just a ...


2

I think ideally, you'd want the person who actually solved your problem to write the answer so you can accept it—or, if he's not going to do so, to put his solution into a Community Wiki answer (as with Question with no answers, but issue solved in the comments) and accept that. If the helpful person has already edited someone else's answer to be correct, ...


4

If it is correct answer - accept it. There are many reasons why one would be an Answerers who only use comments, or prefer edits over creating own answer. One reason why not to create new answer is original answer is 95% there and creating new complete answer would mean essentially copying whole existing answer and adding one word. This may be reasonable ...


3

According to me it means my answer didn't help anybody so should I delete it. With no votes or comments on either answer, there's no way to conclude that it wasn't helpful. The question currently has 32 views. It could be that the people who saw it didn't have SO accounts, didn't have enough rep to up-vote or comment, or just didn't leave votes or ...


12

If you think the answer is of positive value, then keep it around. If you feel that the answer is actively harmful, and that future readers would be better off not seeing your answer than being able to read it, then delete it. You can use the opinions of others to help inform you, and to realize your mistakes or to realize that something that you thought ...


32

If you simply want to see the most-viewed questions to which you've supplied a positively-scored answer, you can use this query in SEDE: SELECT QuestionPosts.Title, QuestionPosts.Id, QuestionPosts.ViewCount FROM Posts AnswerPosts JOIN Posts QuestionPosts ON AnswerPosts.ParentId = QuestionPosts.Id WHERE AnswerPosts.PostTypeId = 2 AND AnswerPosts.Score ...


1

To be polite I first ask the OP if they mind if move the comment to the answer and ask them if they'll accept it there. Everyone has said yes, and accepted the answer posted right away. If you just move the response to the answer w/o any interaction with the poster they may not realize you've updated to an answer. I haven't deleted the dup comments ...


3

Yes you should answer it yourself and get the reward; otherwise it is open for someone else to post your answer as a community Wiki answer as described here: Question with no answers, but issue solved in the comments


7

Yes, you should post it as an answer. You should also remove your comment once the answer is posted as it is obsolete at that point. An answer is always better than a comment. It is easier for the original poster to see solutions. It is easier for future visitors to see solutions. Comments can be hidden if the comment thread gets long. Comments can be ...


4

I think it depends whether there is an answer behind the joke or not. For example, this fantastic answer both provides a joke and a comment. But the whole purpose of the answer is a joke - one could simply say such a small detail as use a damn html parser in the comments. Sometimes, a joke is good to hit the nail harder - even if it doesn't answer the ...


7

"SO is better known as a platform where people can help each other" You may have approached the site with a wrong attitude, it's not primarily about you getting helped, but we want to have questions (and answers) that are suitable to help anyone in future research. I have checked some of your unanswered questions, which describe very localized ...


7

Not every question in the world have an answer. To get the best responses, your question should be good: Write a title that summarizes the specific problem Introduce the problem before you post any code Help others reproduce the problem Include all relevant tags Proof-read before posting! ... If you feel your posts meet the standards, you can raise a ...


10

Just to be clear: We are not against friendliness. Or politeness. They are explicitly welcome. Our resistance to some types of friendly discourse is a necessary cost due to our need to control noise. But it should only be applied when it is needed to offset some greater harm. Personally, I'd encourage "thanks so much" comments, if it weren't for the ...


1

I have seen this scenario handled many times by an additional answer that clearly refers to a previous answer, then expands on it in a substantial way. No need to copy the part that would be the same, instead focus on enhancing the learning experience for the OP. For example, I've used it myself here. Questions can have multiple answers - but that doesn't ...


2

If your answer is practically identical, I suggest upvoting the other answer instead of posting. Otherwise it depends on what you mean by "a little more complete". If an explanation is different, I'd use a new answer. It's wrong to put words into another user's post, and most explanations are too important and long for comments. Besides, you could ...


12

You should not be adding new content to someone else's answer. If there is a small bit if information that you would like to add, you could post a comment to encourage the author to add it to their answer. If it's something more substantial, you can post your own answer.


4

The challenge with a "ban" on preambles is that they can in fact be useful to highlight why a new answer is now appropriate. Circumstances change, new insights are obtained, and these may lead to better answers. If this is the case, it is important to point out these insights/circumstances before giving an answer that depends on them. Now, a preamble such ...


6

I personally do this since I believe it is the right thing to do if you are going to drag a 2-3 year old thread to the top of the question pile again. Normally this is done out of courtesy to the other answerers who may have last edited the thread 2-3 years ago and may, in turn, suffer from your own answer. One example could be that you provide an updated ...


7

Generally speaking, post the solution as the answer to your question. This way, when others stumble across the same problem, they don't have to wait for someone to answer a question they post, but instead, they can find your question & answer in a search result. An exception to this rule might be made if the actual solution is based on some silly ...


15

I think such a disclaimer is not necessary. It isn't really bad on long answers, but it can detract from the content for short answers. What can I do instead? If answerers really want to convey that they know what they are doing by answering, they can comment on their own answer. A comment is just that: a comment. Whether it is a meta-comment (in the sense ...


14

Trojan it. Now you are accepted, you have the checkmark of destiny. You understand that your answer is horrible, so improve your answer. This might involve regulating your existing answer to a heavily "hidden" sub-clause with lots of qualifiers that describes why it is a bad idea. The main thread of the answer should then become whatever you think the ...


31

If you see it and want it removed, there is no reason not to as it makes the answer more clear. That being said, there is also no reason to seek out this type of preamble in order to edit it out. It would be a terrible waste of time, and to be honest, the preamble does not significantly detract from the answer. For the most part questions are discouraged ...


42

I was going to stay quiet, on the basis that I always try and avoid an argument, so despite my misgivings, I'm going to identify myself as someone who uses this as an introductory sentence to an answer quite frequently. In fact I was sensitive enough to worry you were talking about me specifically, but a wiser me knows that is just normal paranoia. (But then ...


25

Edit the answer to add a bigger disclaimer, if that makes you feel better.


7

There is really nothing wrong in posting answer that solves OP problem in exactly the way it is asked. There are cases when following worst possible practices is the most acceptable choice. Note that reputation of person asking the question can't be used as guide for whether OP just clueless and typed in random code OR actually spend days picking only ...


11

A badge for posting consistently good content is a good idea. There's a series of badges for consistently asking good questions. The problem with your proposal is that it does not really capture consistently good answerers. You propose rewarding users who have a high median score on their posts. This incentivizes posting high-score answers, which reputation ...


47

Leave it. Anyone who has been here awhile knows that an accepted answer isn't necessarily correct or best practice. What the acceptance means is that the user deemed your answer the most useful. Provided you have clearly stated that your code is a monstrosity then your conscience is clean. This particular user didn't care, and future users will know. As ...


5

The other answers have some valuable information, so I will keep this "short". In some cases, should inactive questions that aren't adding any value be flagged, and if so flagged as what? As someone who patrols a niche tag, I know that flagging won't do any good. There are maybe 2 other users looking at those tags regularly. 3 users is not enough to ...


13

What improvements are likely to have the most noticeable positive impact on the quality of information available? Much more can be done. To name a few : Whenever you bump into an unanswered question, and find a solution later, post it here. This is likely to help others who would end up here with the same problem. You can always edit poor(unreadable) ...


7

Age doesn't matter. (Much.) If you have an answer, answer it! Someone else might find it; the green checkmark is not the only measure of value. If something deserves to be closed, flag it! If not, don't. If someone answered in comments, ask them to flesh it out! Or post an answer of your own as community wiki and explain it's based on the comments. The ...


11

What should I do about this answer, given that it was changed in its entirety? Nothing. If your vote is still valid, leave it in place. At most leave a comment with regard to the revised content. But apart from that you'll just have to move on. If the answer really is bad, all you can hope for is that future voters will tip the scale in the ...


3

For a Q&A that supposedly needs heavy editing, that one seems to have garnered a healthy number of upvotes, on both the question and the answer, as well as several highly complimentary comments. That said, if you are aware of factual errors in either the question or answer, it seems to me that this is the right answer: I could edit the answer (note: ...


20

It happened to one of my answers. Another user modified my answer substantially, enough to make it their answer. I rolled back the answer and asked them to create another answer. They did. Strangely enough, their answer got accepted by the OP. In the end, I think that was the right thing for both of us. They got credit for their answer. Had I left my answer ...


5

Try to leave a comment to the OP (or contact them otherwise) to point out that you could probably rewrite their answer to be way more comprehensible than it currently is. Accompany with judicious praise for the existing answer. ;) Perhaps the OP is aware of the convoluted nature of their answer and just can't get around to rewrite it themselves. In that case ...


33

If you totally edit it (as in rewriting), you're jeopardizing that user's reputation; they're the ones that could potentially receive negative impact from your efforts. I'd be pretty ticked off if someone did that to one of my answers, and would most likely roll the edit back. If the answer is that unclear, a better solution would probably be to either ...


4

You'd have to flag the post for moderator attention, requesting that the change is reverted.


0

I'm not claiming to be a shining example for great answers, but I often like to structure my answers to accommodate both types of "consumers". I mostly try to give a brief summary of the key points in one or two sentences at the start, and then provide more detail and background following that. I don't think very long answers where you have to read to the ...


3

More details usually leads to a better solution and a stronger understanding of the problem space. If you can provide an answer that explains a bit more than just code, then all the better. Both of your answers can stand; yours just has a bit more detail to it, is all. That said, this concerns me: Shortly, the OP asked a question about implementation ...


11

I would upvote the other answer, and if needed, leave a comment suggesting further improvement. It looks like the other answer gave credit where credit was due, which is something we want to encourage here. There's no reason to delete your answer, it isn't a bad answer and it looks like it may have already helped a few people. Unless you intend to take ...


0

The answerer got it right, but posted what IMHO is a low quality answer. You can esaily open that link and look at the information provided about the topic, and see that the answer given is not really a complete one, and it lacks of foundamental content. The OP asked for the meaning of the bdata private word in variable's declarations, so a clear and ...


3

It's acceptable when your question is a good, on-topic question that could reasonably be answered by others; and you know the answer to it. Assuming you're talking about this question -- your question seems very basic, but I think it meets these criteria. I expect (being so basic) that it is probably a duplicate, so posting your own question with an ...



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