I know this will get down voted by many, But I am curious to know How stackoverflow trend will be after some 5 or 10 years. There will be a huge difference in reps among hi-reps users and new joiners after 10 years. That difference will not encourage the new joiners to actively participate in this community, as they know they will not achieve that milestone. Will that make this community only for hi-reps users in future?

Fact everyone has to accept is hi-rep users will not like to do janitor works for years as they will get bored of redundancy. If they stop doing janitor work, site will be a mess. The number of users will increase but site will lose its credibility.

Also nowadays it is little difficult to get reputations than it is used to be earlier. Ultimately I am looking answers for the question "How to encourage new users in future, new users discouraged/outrage when down voted."

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There is some users that out scored millions of users in a short time, because of there brilliant answers, so no it won't be a problem in the future. –  Networker Sep 3 at 3:03
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This is a great opportunity for someone (maybe Hans?) to create a time series of the number of NEW 10k users per week. If the series is stable, or increasing, then there's no case to answer. –  Gayot Fow Sep 3 at 3:25
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Not sure how this is terribly relevant, @GayotFow - but here. –  Shog9 Sep 3 at 4:00
    
@Shog9, thanks and indeed very relevant! –  Gayot Fow Sep 3 at 9:39
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Just a little advice: Don't bother with "I know this will get down voted..." At all. Ever. Just state your case. Exhibit your understanding that people will disagree by the manner in which you handle that disagreement. Starting off with that statement says to some people, "I know you won't like this, but I don't care; I'm subjecting it to you, anyway." Of course, you do know that, but pointing it out doesn't help, IMO. –  Andrew Barber Sep 3 at 15:56

2 Answers 2

up vote 14 down vote accepted

I disagree with your initial premise:

There will be a huge difference in reps among hi-reps users and new joiners after 10 years. That difference will not encourage the new joiners to actively participate in this community, as they know they will not achieve that milestone.

When I joined this site many moons ago, I was a long way away from the most active users in terms of reputation. That didn't deter me from participating, though.

I didn't join this site to accumulate reputation. No one should. It is far too much work for that. I actually have to think—when I read questions, when I post answers, and when I read answers posted by other people. No, I'm here to learn new things and to help others. You join to become a better programmer, to sharpen your skills, to get help with your problems, and maybe to build a little bit of karma by helping others. And because the ability to teach and explain things to your fellow programmers is a valuable, marketable skill. You don't join for fake Internet points; no one really cares.

The only reason why reputation matters is because it unlocks certain privileges that enable you to fully participate. For example, first you get the ability to vote, and then to comment, and then to edit, and then to moderate. Once you get all of those privileges, reputation no longer matters (if it ever did in the first place). The truth is, it is really just an imperfect way of measuring your experience on the site, and therefore whether you can be trusted with additional privileges.

And since those privilege thresholds are fixed, it doesn't matter when you join. You still only have to earn 50 reputation to have the privilege to comment. It doesn't matter that Jon Skeet broke the reputation counter, you'll still just need 50 reputation to comment. And you'll still need just 3k reputation to edit other posts. And so on.


This, however, is a real problem:

Fact everyone has to accept is hi-rep users will not like to do janitor works for years as they will get bored of redundancy. If they stop doing janitor work, site will be a mess. The number of users will increase but site will lose its credibility.

It does get tiring. That's why we try to spread out the load. It's why the site is largely community moderated, rather than a small handful of individuals trying to do all of the dirty work. It would rapidly burn out even the most dedicated of people.

But beyond that, how else do you suggest that we deal with this problem? It is a problem that has very little to do with reputation, and everything to do with moderation. They are only linked because we trust experienced users (those with high reputation) to moderate.

The team is working on making things slightly easier for us to keep the site clean. They recently gave gold tag badge holders the ability to mark a question as a duplicate with only a single vote. This has been awesome, and I hope it is a harbinger of things to come on the moderation front. If you have any more awesome ideas like this, please feel free to propose them.


Also nowadays it is little difficult to get reputations than it is used to be earlier.

Totally wrong. There are zillions more users now than there were in the early days, and tons more questions, making it lots easier to earn reputation.

There are plenty of new users who have ticked their way up the ranks. Maybe no one will ever catch up with Jon Skeet, but that really isn't the point.


Ultimately I am looking answers for the question "How to encourage new users in future, new users discouraged/outrage when down voted."

So I guess "get over it" won't do it for you? Seriously, neither of those are appropriate reactions to a downvote. Voting works as a rating system for content here.

The only time you should get discouraged is if a majority of your contributions are being repeatedly downvoted. Then you might want to try and figure out why the community as a whole finds your contributions to be unhelpful. If some healthy self-criticism doesn't reveal the answer, perhaps ask for some direction here on Meta. Someone did that very recently, and Robert Harvey posted an extremely helpful and insightful answer.

Outrage over downvotes is just outrageous.

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Thanks for the insight. –  Joachin Joseph Sep 3 at 6:25
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Actually with the recently increased downvote/upvote ratio it should indeed be more difficult to gain reputation, shouldn't it. The question whether it is more easy or more difficult nowadays to get reputation surely is debatable and deserves its own discussion. –  Trilarion Sep 3 at 8:00
    
@Trilarion The recent increase in downvote/upvote ratio does not mean it's more difficult to gain reputation. It means there are more people downvoting bad questions and answers than before (and more people posting them). It's still easy to gain reputation if you post quality questions and answers. –  Bill the Lizard Sep 3 at 12:17
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@BilltheLizard More people downvoting bad questions and answers than before means it's more difficult to gain reputation for those who are perceived as delivering sub standard contributions. The whole situation is quite complex. That's why is wrote it's debatable. I'm not sure if it really is still easy to gain reputation and would doubt it without statistics to back it up. –  Trilarion Sep 3 at 13:15
    
I think it is more difficult to gain reputation now. Most of the common questions have been asked before and have at least one highly upvoted question/answer that the scores of people with the same question will find. Now, to gain rep you often either have to answer duplicates/bad questions or very niche questions (which don't generally get a whole lot of views because not many people will have the same problem). This probably depends on the tags you frequent, though. –  eddie_cat Sep 3 at 13:27

There will be a huge difference in reps among hi-reps users and new joiners after 10 years. That difference will not encourage the new joiners to actively participate in this community, as they know they will not achieve that milestone.

My answer will be an old phrase : never compare your beginning with else's middle.

Fact everyone has to accept is hi-rep users will not like to do janitor works for years as they will get bored of redundancy. If they stop doing janitor work, site will be a mess.

As Peter Parker's uncle says "With great power comes great responsibility" So will repeat the dialogue in context to SO: With high reputation comes great responsibility.

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