I recently found this question which originally had both c# and vb.net tags. The question was about how to sort a ListBox, which is relevant to both languages. I decided to answer it in vb.net. Later, the vb.net tag was removed and my answer downvoted because it was the wrong language. Fine. I added c# to my answer. People seemed unhappy that the vb.net was still there.

In my opinion, this question is about .NET and winforms, and could be relevant to either c# or vb.net. Just Google this: How to sort items in listbox vb.net and you should see the question. So if a vb.net dev is looking for an answer to the question, they could stumble upon mine, and would get a solution. If this is the case, then what is the harm in leaving the tag? I would argue that it is in fact more beneficial than detrimental to include the vb.net tag.

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For a question to which the reader of the question really doesn't care which language an answer uses, using both can be appropriate. When the reader is going to be expecting a particular language then no, the question shouldn't be tagged with both languages –  Servy Aug 28 at 17:44
    
That's assuming the question is only meant to help the OP. This would effectively make the question less useful to the community as a whole. –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 17:47
    
I never used the term OP in my comment, and that was very intentional. –  Servy Aug 28 at 17:49
    
I should have read your comment better. Then it's a chicken and egg thing. Without the vb.net tag, vb.net readers would land there less, and there would be no point for supplying the solution in vb.net. Including the tag would attract more vb.net readers, and it would make sense to include that solution. –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 17:53
    
It's not a question of how many readers are expecting VB in the answers, it's whether the person seeking the answer is expecting an answer in VB or if the person seeking an answer to the question really doesn't care if they get an answer in VB or C#. If the question and answer are written such that the people finding the question won't care which language is used (this is often that case if the question is a higher level question in which the code itself is more tangential, and it is the English Explanations that matter) then using both is appropriate. –  Servy Aug 28 at 17:57
    
You're basically just proposing that people ask two separate questions, asking for a VB and a C# solution, in one question. SO is designed to have one question per question. If you want to know how to solve a problem in both C# and VB, then you have two questions, not one. –  Servy Aug 28 at 17:58
    
I see your point, and think you're right, it should be two questions. Part of my position on this came from me being a vb.net dev and having to google "how to ... c#" to get a quality answer out of SO because of c#'s popularity compared to vb.net. My idea was that it wouldn't hurt to supply both when the question is relevant to both. However, SO is not set up this way. –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 18:04
    
Relevant.. Probably best to choose C# next time, you'll get hassled less. –  Hans Passant Aug 28 at 18:18
    
Sigh... yes I have become more fluent in C# by searching for solutions to .NET problems which have no answer in VB.NET on SO. I guess I should see this as a good thing. Conform! –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 18:33
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Dear God, all the backticks. –  BoltClock Aug 28 at 18:34
    
No matter how difficult it is for you to look at, i assure you it was harder for me to type them all. –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 18:59
    
@HansPassant stackoverflow.com/questions/25573224/… @ DJKRAZE's comments to the question. They have been removed... –  Dan Verdolino Aug 29 at 22:19

2 Answers 2

You're basically just proposing that people ask two separate questions, asking for a VB and a C# solution, in one question. SO is designed to have one question per question. If you want to know how to solve a problem in both C# and VB, then you have two questions, not one.

There are circumstances where it's appropriate for a question to be tagged with those languages, but that is when reader of the question won't care which language is used. (This is often that case if the question is a higher level question in which the code itself is more tangential, and it is the English Explanations that matter.) If readers of a particular question are going to want the question/answer to be in a particular language, then the question should be specific to that language instead of trying to smush two separate questions into one space.

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You can prioritize tag over the other by what the OP's prioritized. He posted code in C#, then he seem to rather see code in C# than VB. But if no sign of any of those languages, you can just tag it as .NET.

Google won't benefit from adding VB.NET or C# to the search bar, he won't associate title with tags. (From my experience)

I don't think you can force everyone to write multiply solutions, even after you can, you can't because you have more than 10 .NET programming languages (source) and you can't make them all know those languages, but you can't just prioritize few languages.

To solve this, download C#2VB tool and use it.

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This is a concise answer, makes sense. Code was supplied in c#. But when the question could apply to either language, regardless of code supplied, what is the harm in answering with both c# and vb.net? –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 18:06
    
@DanVerdolino I wrote about it too, you can just tag it as .NET. –  KugBuBu Aug 28 at 18:08
    
@DanVerdolino The harm is noise. SO is all about having a high signal to noise ratio. When anyone reading the question is forced to ignore half of every answer, that's a problem. –  Servy Aug 28 at 18:08
    
@DanVerdolino About the harm thing is, that there's a lot more .NET languages that it won't fit into the tags' bar. Why choose VB.NET over others? –  KugBuBu Aug 28 at 18:09
    
@Servy I don't think it's noise if it's somehow helpful to others, even if a bit. But that's almost an opinion. –  KugBuBu Aug 28 at 18:10
    
@KugBuBu Yes, it is. I didn't say that all VB code would inherently be useless. A question with both solutions is half noise because no matter what, the reader is forced to ignore half of the answer. It doesn't matter which half they need to ignore, there's still half of it that they need to sift through. The whole point of having a high signal to noise ratio is that when someone has a problem and they are looking for a solution, whenever they see something that helps them solve their problem its signal, when they see something that doesn't it's noise. –  Servy Aug 28 at 18:12
    
@Servy in the case of the question How to sort items in listbox a vb dev would either see 0:1 or 1:1 SNR. The c# dev would see 1:0 or 1:1 SNR. The OP's code has nothing to do with this. Saying we should defer to the OP's code for the answer's language selection seems arbitrary unless the sole reason is to reduce the c# dev's SNR. –  Dan Verdolino Aug 28 at 18:17
    
@Servy I read it wrong. I thought it was the same as adding VB and C# as tags. I think it's more of a problem because it isn't associated with the OP's question. If VB programmer want to understand the C# code, he can just paste the code to some C#2VB tool. But still it will be good feature to have tabbed code panel, but I don't think you can force everyone to learn VB or use a tool to use this feature. –  KugBuBu Aug 28 at 18:17
    
@DanVerdolino If VB devs are looking for solutions to this problem then a VB question can be asked and answered, giving programmers in both languages a 1:1 SNR, rather than giving everything a 1:2 SNR. If you have two separate questions then ask two separate questions. I didn't say, "ask one question and refuse to let people ask the other question." –  Servy Aug 28 at 18:32

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