I just wrote this question: Why isn't Go linking my assembly properly?

As it turns out, the problem was a single character. Go wants you to use a mid-dot (·) instead of a period (.) in assembly files. There's a close reason for a "simple typographical error". I don't want to run afoul of anything, but at the same time this is a pretty esoteric problem. You generally don't expect to have to use a mid-dot when programming.

Since the typo is so esoteric is the question in the clear, or should I (or a mod?) do something about the question since it turned out to just a wrong character issue?

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Well, that's quite evil. Hard to guess what these guys at AT&T where smoking. Keep it around. And perhaps embellish, the character is special too (U+2215). –  Hans Passant Aug 23 at 13:10
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So do we vote up/down if we want the question open/closed or the opposite? –  user000001 Aug 23 at 13:12
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@user You vote up if you think this question is clear, useful, and shows evidence of research effort. You vote down if you disagree with one or many of those things. You might also vote this question down if you think this is altogether a non-issue, that Jsor shouldn't be worrying about his old questions or cleaning up the site, and that this question is just wasting our time. (Obviously I don't think that applies here, but there are questions where it does.) You could also vote it down if you think the presentation of this question is problematic, like it is a rant (which it isn't). –  Cody Gray Aug 23 at 13:16
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That's by no means a simple typographical error. Seems more like extremely bad language design - not only is it confusing, how do you even type that on a US keyboard (or on my german one)? I think this is a valid question as it is extremely unintuitive, and certainly different from all of the questions answerable with "you forgot a semicolon/closing paren/capitalization" which are closed with the mentioned reason. There's consensus that even wrong indentation in python doesn't fall under this close reason except for very simple cases, and these cases seem much simpler than your issue. –  l4mpi Aug 23 at 13:17
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@HansPassant: 'Tis curious — I was under the illusion that Go was created at Google, not AT&T, albeit by people who once worked at AT&T. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 24 at 15:15
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@Jonathan, the assembler came from Plan 9, a forgotten OS from Bell Labs. –  Hans Passant Aug 24 at 15:21
    
@HansPassant: OK — livin' and learnin'. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 24 at 15:22
    
It should be noted that this close reason hardly ever is used, simply because most posters will delete the question themselves out of embarassment, if it is truly just "a simple typo". If the OP still thinks the question is valid, then it probably doesn't fall into this category. –  RBarryYoung Aug 25 at 19:52

2 Answers 2

If you think the answer to the question might help someone else in the future (for example, when they run into the same problem and go searching for a solution), post a good answer and keep it around.

Otherwise, if it's truly a bone-headed typo, delete the question. Questions that have already received an answer will need a moderator's intervention to delete them. This is because you are essentially nullifying the time spent and the reputation earned by the person who answered your question. We don't take that lightly, and doing it repeatedly would be considered abusive behavior. However, the moderators will generally make an exception if you use the custom flag box to explain your motive of cleaning up the site by removing questions that will never be of help to anyone else.

In this particular case, I agree with Hans:

Well, that's quite evil. Hard to guess what these guys at AT&T where smoking. Keep it around. And perhaps embellish, the character is special too (U+2215).

This is a well-asked question, with a good answer, about an unintuitive problem that is very likely to be useful to others.

But you should consider doing like he suggests and make the question and answer somewhat more general, so that it will be helpful to even more people. That will also allow us to close similar questions received in the future as duplicates of that one, which has already received a good answer.

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'Tis curious — I was under the illusion that Go was created at Google, not AT&T, albeit by people who once worked at AT&T. (I know you're transcribing someone else's erroneous comment, but…) –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 24 at 15:17
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@JonathanLeffler Go was created by Google, but the problem was in the assembly code, which AT&T designed. –  Colonel Thirty Two Aug 24 at 15:19
    
@ColonelThirtyTwo: OK — livin' and learnin'. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 24 at 15:22

It's a good question with the correct answer. It's not a typographical error. However, revise the title to something more searchable. For example,

Go isn't linking my assembly: undefined external function.

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