The Stack Overflow FAQ states:

What happens when a post is deleted?

Once a post has been deleted, it will disappear for all users except developers, moderators, and other fellow users with this privilege. However, deleted posts can be undeleted by casting undelete votes. Once a post has 3 undelete votes, it will no longer be deleted.

However it doesn't mention the poster. Will he/she still be able to see his/her own posts?

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Um, what page of the FAQ does that come from specifically (link)? –  Cupcake Aug 11 at 2:33
    
I got it from here –  simonzack Aug 11 at 2:36
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You did a very strange copy and paste in your question. The linked page clearly says that authors can see their own delete posts, right in between "moderators, developers, blah blah" and "undelete blah blah". –  Cupcake Aug 11 at 2:39
    
Strange, I must have copied it from some other place then, don't remember where. –  simonzack Aug 11 at 2:48
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1 Answer 1

up vote 18 down vote accepted

Let me be precise:

  • the author of a deleted question can always see its question and everything around
  • the author of a deleted answer on a non deleted question can still see its answers and related comments

But the author of an answer on a deleted question has no access to its text (unless he has more than 10k rep ...)

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lesson learned: abstain of answering close- and delete-worthy questions –  gnat Aug 11 at 14:19
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@gnat That has nothing to do with not being able to see it ever again. It's because when you answer rubbish you promote rubbish. You should definitely not be answering close- and delete-worthy questions. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 12 at 11:27
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit : yes but the author of a question always sees it even if it is rubbish. Ne need to explain further : I know the policy and its reasons. I said that to warn other users that could read this post. –  Serge Ballesta Aug 12 at 12:15
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit i.stack.imgur.com/MW9QR.gif –  gnat Aug 12 at 12:21

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