I received the e-mail below about a close vote I cast, from another SO user that I had met at a conference 5 years ago and exchanged a couple of work-related emails with since. I have no interest in discussing the matter further than “it seems to me that the question invites a recommendation or a comparison, things listed as not to ask about”. I would also like any such discussion to occur elsewhere than in my inbox, hence my redirecting the message here. I believe that I already saw Ira express his disappointment with SO policy months ago and I am surprised he still clings to it if he doesn't like it.


http://stackoverflow.com/questions/25115283/comparison-between-static-code-analysis-tools-for-c

"Questions asking us to recommend or find a book, tool, software library, tutorial or other off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it." - * Pascal Cuoq * [others]

Programming is pretty much about tools.

I must say I'm surprised you are willing participate in shutting down questions like this. SO's policy of denying requests for tools is, IMHO, outright stupid, and makes SO that much less useful. (The existence of SR is acknowledgement this is stupid).

The notion that SO should be entirely self-contained is the walled-garden idea of Facebook and Yahoo, where the purpose is to keep eyeballs on the site to maximize revenue. Offsite-eyeballs don't deliver revenue. I find that that extremely self-serving on the part of SO and affiliated sites.

A request for a resource cannot be satisfied by "describe the problem and what has been to solve it". That is a ridiculous response.

The notion that a book, tutorial, library should not be allowed means that SO appears to be against offering one of the greatest results of civilization: the ability to pass knowledge through a well-package resource. This is just astonishing for site that claims to be about knowledge. Nor does it make sense to "copy" those things in entirety to SO. First it violates copyright. Secondly, SO won't allow Aho&Ullman in a single answer. Third, there is zero point in replicating perfectly fine documents. The only reasonable response is a link. The purpose of the web is to share without copying.

The notion that off-site links might go stale is true, but irrelevant. On-site information goes stale too. A very significant fraction of questions on SO are how you do something with language technology X (e.g., Java and C#) How you program in C# today is different than how you programmed with it 5 years ago, just because of evolution of language, library, context, and changing sets of alternatives.
Eventually technologies fade; SO answers will correspondingly fade.
Everything at SO is ephemeral. This is really about preventing people from leaving the SO site once again.

The fact that some answer are "opinionated" will always be true. "How to load something into EAX" has multiple answers, all based on opinions about what the best way to do it is. If the opinions are bad enough, downvotes can handle them fine.

The notion that some answers are "spam" is true. Many answers about tools are not. I find it disingenuous that answers suggesting use of well known tools are tolerated, and answers that suggest relatively unknown tools are treated like spam. I find the community also hates tools that are commercial; programmers are amazingly two-faced in wanting to be paid for a living, but not wanting to pay other programmers for their sweat. (Yes, I have a vested interest here. So do you. I believe our motives for our respective tools are decent). Worse, "spam" appears to be defined as "I don't like this answer" (or "I don't like the poster") by many spam-taggers; that makes their spam designation just as (if not worse) opinionated than the answers.

I'm sorry to see that you have drunk this Kool-aid, and have become an active enforcer of a stupid policy.

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It was Flavor-Aid, anyways. –  Jason C Aug 10 at 18:47
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On the one hand, it's good for this to be discussed. On the other hand, I would have caused a discussion by asking the sender if he would like to discuss it on [meta]. I would have given him the chance to keep a private email private. I say this as someone who has criticized this behavior (and possibly this user) in the past. –  John Saunders Aug 11 at 6:35
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If you're looking for a tool go to Screwfix. –  MelanciaUK Aug 11 at 22:28
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Oh, worth discussing sure. But any dialogue that starts with "what you're doing is outright stupid" isn't going to be much of a discussion. Also, I'm sure this issue has been discussed to death in the past. If this person doesn't like SO, he's welcome to use a different web site, or create his own. –  David Wallace Aug 11 at 22:40
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@johnsaunders if I apply a publicly agreed-on rule and you send me a private email to call me stupid for doing so, your arguments had better be ready for public scrutiny. AND IF YOU DON'T LIKE IT DON'T SEND ME UNSOLICITED EMAIL. –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 11 at 23:03
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What does SR stand for? –  Tavian Barnes Aug 11 at 23:11
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@TavianBarnes: softwarerecs.stackexchange.com –  jwodder Aug 11 at 23:14
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@Pascal, +1000 to unsolicited email diatribes not meriting privacy. –  Kirk Woll Aug 11 at 23:24
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@PascalCuoq: just telling you that I would have done differently. If the author told me he didn't want me to publicize the content of the email, I might then have created this post saying that he sent the email but asked me not to reveal the contents. –  John Saunders Aug 12 at 0:53
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@John, um, yeah, except the emailer evidently did not explicitly ask for privacy, so I'm confused how your point is not a strawman. –  Kirk Woll Aug 13 at 2:20
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In general, when someone sends you an email, they intend for it to be shared between the two of you. The fact that you don't like the email he sent you doesn't give you standing to make the private communication public. –  John Saunders Aug 13 at 3:05
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@johnsaunders in general, when you provide your email to a company for the purpose of getting an academic license for something, you don't feel like you are giving license to the company's owner to send you any message calling you stupid for the enforcement of agreed-on rules, annoying as they may be to him seeing how he'd like to advertise his products. Or perhaps reporting Nigerian scams should be considered a breach of the scammer's right to privacy, too? –  Pascal Cuoq Aug 13 at 6:28
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It seems pretty obvious to me that the existence of SR is acknowledgement that recommendations and programming help are two separate things that deserve separate sites, which is pretty much the opposite of what he's trying to argue by bringing it up… –  abarnert Aug 13 at 6:29
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I think, private should remain private. –  Gödel77 Aug 13 at 10:06
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Limits of Self-Promotion XLXXVVIII –  Robert Harvey Aug 13 at 17:09

7 Answers 7

up vote 91 down vote accepted

I must say I'm surprised you are willing participate in shutting down questions like this. SO's policy of denying requests for tools is, IMHO, outright stupid, and makes SO that much less useful. (The existence of SR is acknowledgement this is stupid).

Well, we didn't just make this policy up out of nothing. We arrived at it based on evidence. Questions asking for tool and resource recommendations were observed to attract opinionated answers and spam, so we decided we don't want them here. Having them was making SO that much less useful for its intended purpose. The existence of Software Recommendations is an experiment, not an acknowledgement that the policy is stupid.

The notion that SO should be entirely self-contained is the walled-garden idea of Facebook and Yahoo, where the purpose is to keep eyeballs on the site to maximize revenue. Offsite-eyeballs don't deliver revenue. I find that that extremely self-serving on the part of SO and affiliated sites.

This doesn't even make sense. If we're just trying to keep eyeballs on the site, why are we sending people away? I don't understand this line of thinking.

A request for a resource cannot be satisfied by "describe the problem and what has been [done so far] to solve it". That is a ridiculous response.

Sure it can. It's ridiculous to think that it can't.

The notion that a book, tutorial, library should not be allowed means that SO appears to be against offering one of the greatest results of civilization: the ability to pass knowledge through a well-package resource...

Straw man.

The notion that off-site links might go stale is true, but irrelevant...

I'm not sure why this paragraph is here. It doesn't seem related to the "tools recommendation" argument.

The notion that some answers are "spam" is true. Many answers about tools are not. I find it disingenuous that answers suggesting use of well known tools are tolerated, and answers that suggest relatively unknown tools are treated like spam.

This isn't really true. If all you do on the site is recommend your own product, you are treated like a spammer. Also, if you plug your product without disclosing your affiliation you're treated like a spammer. This is well-known. Claiming otherwise seems dishonest.

I find the community also hates tools that are commercial; programmers are amazingly two-faced in wanting to be paid for a living, but not wanting to pay other programmers for their sweat. (Yes, I have a vested interest here. So do you. I believe our motives for our respective tools are decent).

Well, we're not here as a sales vehicle, so what do you expect? We're here to ask other programmers how to solve problems, not to shop.

Worse, "spam" appears to be defined as "I don't like this answer" (or "I don't like the poster") by many spam-taggers; that makes their spam designation just as (if not worse) opinionated than the answers.

Spam is clearly defined. We decline spam flags when they appear to be unfounded. The fact that a minority use the flag incorrectly isn't evidence that the flag itself is defined incorrectly.

In short, these arguments don't seem to be supported by logic and reason. Instead they seem to be financially motivated. I'd mark this email as spam and let future attempts at contact from this company be filtered out of your inbox automatically.

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Wow, I'm impressed that you had the strength of mind and will to actually bother reading through all of that. –  Cupcake Aug 10 at 17:41
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The only part I disagree with you on (and, hence, agree with Ira on) is "the community also hates tools that are commercial". It does appear to be biased against anything that hasn't been dunked in the "omg costless" Kool-aid for at least two hours on 180º, and I think that's true of the online programming community at large. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 10:46
    
A shame to see he's still doing it, too. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 10:52
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@LightnessRacesinOrbit Yeah, I can't argue with that point. There's a strong bias in favor of free tools. However, I don't mark something as spam just because it promotes a paid tool or app. They're held to the same standard of disclosure. –  Bill the Lizard Aug 11 at 11:08
    
@BilltheLizard: Of course –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 11:09
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Highly disagree with "Well, we didn't just make this policy up out of nothing. We arrived at it based on evidence.", some of the top answers on Google are that kind of questions that are closed now. Justifying a stupid policy because "it just is" doesn't make it less stupid" –  OneOfOne Aug 11 at 22:56
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@OneOfOne It's not my opinion, it's what happened. Google doesn't index all the bad questions of this type that we deleted. –  Bill the Lizard Aug 11 at 23:25
    
I understand that, deleting the bad questions and leaving the good ones is better than disallowing it all IMO. –  OneOfOne Aug 11 at 23:30
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@OneOfOne Not when the bad outnumber the good 100 to 1. (Or when even the good ones get repeated on a weekly basis. I can't tell you how many copies of "What's the best programming book?" I deleted.) –  Bill the Lizard Aug 11 at 23:32
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@OneOfOne: Recommendation questions really are bad. People who want to promote products with even a tangential relation to the subject matter of such a question will do so, and will do so unabashedly. This reality flies in the face of (at least my) intuition and common sense. Maybe 0.1% of recommendation questions (real recommendation questions, not poorly-phrased non-recommendation questions) are sufficiently limited in scope and content to generate a useful response from SO. –  tmyklebu Aug 12 at 12:35
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1/2 I don't really like the "close if opinion based" policies either actually. Tool recommendation questions are often poor questions but a lot of top SO answers are answers to this type of questions (there are plenty of examples, just google a bit). What I really don't like is that the best questions, i.e. questions that actually share knowledge, are often opinion based questions. A typical case is software architecture related to a given technology (.net in my case). –  ken2k Aug 12 at 16:36
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2/2 Basically, I often see questions like how would you design XXX given that I have requirement YY? I tried ZZZ but it seems like a poor approach to me. Any better idea? that would be awesome questions because experienced people could provide awesome answers. Of course they are instantly closed either because "opinion based" or because classified as "tool recommendation question". It's a real pity IMHO. Here's a random example about such an interesting question that couldn't be asked today: stackoverflow.com/questions/32851/… –  ken2k Aug 12 at 16:36
    
@ken2k 5 years ago, SO was much smaller, and so they didn't need so stringent rules. –  Davidmh Aug 12 at 20:54
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Let's not forget that SR has and enforces pretty strict requirements for what their questions look like. That's nearly impossible on a site the size of SO, but that is effectively what has been making SR work so far. If it was full of "What's the best app for X" one-sentence type questions that SO sees a lot of every day, it would have been shut down already. –  Anna Lear Aug 12 at 21:21
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Not to mention that virtually nobody knows about SR (compared to SO) so it doesn't attract as many folks who decide to use it for cheap advertising. –  Anna Lear Aug 12 at 21:22

This guy's been warned repeatedly about his behaviour—I believe that he had to edit hundreds of answers to remove links to his company to avoid being booted off the site entirely in the past. Frankly, if he has a problem with the site's policy, he should bring it up on Meta, where he can be as totally ignored as everybody else, and certainly not complain externally in an email like this.

If you search for "Limits of self-promotion" on Meta Stack Exchange, you can find at least four rounds dedicated to just this one guy. The entry in the FAQ in this regard was in response to his behaviour.

I've looked at the linked question and it absolutely should have been closed, you were dead right, and it seems to me like he's just upset that he can't spam more links to his company/website.

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I'm going to burst if I don't let this out; "awwww... who's a good puppy? You! Dats who! Yes you are! You got a +1 from daddy! Yes you did! You want a treat?" ... ok. All out of my system, now! ;) –  Andrew Barber Aug 10 at 10:16
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@AndrewBarber: This puppy has it's own language "wide". Please repeat the above in wide :D –  Infinite Happiness Aug 10 at 10:37
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-1 This answer encourages bitching about meta contributers. "he should bring it up on Meta, where he can be as totally ignored as everybody else, and certainly not bitch externally in email like this" Please stay polite. –  Christian Strempfer Aug 10 at 18:48
    
@Chris If you're the kind of person to do that, Q bans happen. –  bjb568 Aug 10 at 18:51
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@bjb568: I'm not, but why should we give trolls an alibi? If he reads this, he could say "Why should I go to meta? They'll ignore me anyway." –  Christian Strempfer Aug 10 at 18:53
    
@Chris Fine, edit it out if you want. –  bjb568 Aug 10 at 18:55
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@Chris: Do a search for the number of accepted chat feature requests and bugfixes over the last few years. Then come back and tell me that it's not the plain truth. –  Puppy Aug 10 at 21:10
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@Cupcake: Why did you rollback? What makes that subjective half sentence important? –  Christian Strempfer Aug 10 at 21:20
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@Chris I didn't find it to be particularly offensive, and I think removing it is unnecessary, but that's just my personal opinion. It's really not a key point of this answer, regardless. If you were going to edit it to be more polite, then there were other things that you should have addressed as well. –  Cupcake Aug 10 at 21:22
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@Puppy: Either he should go to Meta to get it discussed or he shouldn't because it would be ignored. Therefore that half sentence doesn't add any value to your answer (with which I agree beside that). –  Christian Strempfer Aug 10 at 21:25
    
@Chris a complaint about the site's "no recommendation questions" policy would be effectively ignored on Meta, because it's a topic that's probably been debated to death many times over already. I still see no reason to remove that assertion. –  Cupcake Aug 10 at 21:29
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I don't care enough to discuss that further. I just stumbled upon it, and thought it would be food for the trolls. (Comments could be cleaned up, if someone wants to.) –  Christian Strempfer Aug 10 at 21:33
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@InfiniteRecursion: Don't bother; it won't compile –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 10:48

Looks like a childish tantrum to me. He knows the policy and he knows the reasoning. To continue fighting against it by suggesting, in private email, that you should ignore it or otherwise risk being "pitied" by this individual is mind-boggling. I suggest blacklisting the email address and ignoring henceforth.

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Considering that they correspond with each other for work, blacklisting the address wouldn't be a good idea in this case :/ –  Cupcake Aug 11 at 15:30
    
@Cupcake: That's a shame :( –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 15:36

The "no recommendation questions" policy may be imperfect, but almost all of them are problematic and need to be closed because they attract spam and promotion to an extent that defies intuition and everything close to common sense. Especially that question. It's total crap and it's exactly the sort of thing that the policy exists to control. Not only does that question encourage horrible answers, it practically requires that every answer be horrible.

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Not to mention the fact that we have the Software Recommendations site where it could have been asked. –  JonK Aug 11 at 9:27
    
@JonK: I don't see how that's in any way relevant. On-topic on another site doesn't mean off-topic for SO. (Besides, we also have Yahoo! Answers where it could have been asked.) –  tmyklebu Aug 11 at 13:41
    
My point is that there is a place to ask that sort of question, and that SO isn't it. If the user in question is that bothered about pushing their software library, they're in the wrong place and the close reason is spot on. The close message text could do with being reworded slightly though. –  JonK Aug 11 at 13:54
    
@JonK: Yeah, he's definitely in the wrong place if this is how he reacts to spam-reduction. All I'm saying is that "this question is appropriate on another SE site" is irrelevant to whether a question is appropriate on SO. It's inappropriate on SO because it's a crap question. –  tmyklebu Aug 11 at 17:45

A request for a resource cannot be satisfied by "describe the problem and what has been to solve it". That is a ridiculous response.

It does not appear to have occurred to our friend that the incongruity is produced not by any unsuitability of the answer, but by that of the question.

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I understand the policy, and the reasons for it. But I must admit the I would be tempted to consider as valid question asking for pros and cons or typical use cases. As far as I am concerned, I would like to know how experimented people (there are very experimented people around :-) ) actually use complex framework, if they tried some and what they think of them.

Any framework or tool has extensive documentation and tutorials, and with any framework you can easily do simple things. What I'd like to know from Stack Overflow masters is specifically for what use case one framework or tool was considered better and why. I'm pretty sure a lot of knowledge is here, but I've already looked in the tag's wiki page and they are very very generalist.

Would it be the correct place ? Or shall I admit that it is a kind of a Pandora's box that should remain as much closed as possible ?

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@gnat thanks for the information on Programmer - but it is not there that I will find pros and cons between SVN and GIT, already on hold :-( –  Serge Ballesta Aug 11 at 14:38
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to avoid misunderstanding, the reference explains that this kind questions won't work on Programmers, neither anywhere at Stack Exchange network –  gnat Aug 11 at 14:40
    
It's not. The "Pandora's box" thing may be a good way to think of it. The fact is that there's a number of people at various places along the "spammer" spectrum who go about looking for ways to hawk their wares on SO. They latch on to any tangential relation to any question somewhat broad in scope and write a five-paragraph ad in reply. (There is a small fraction of such questions that won't elicit such a response, but the fraction is much smaller than any reasonable person would expect.) –  tmyklebu Aug 12 at 12:40
    
@tmyklebu Funny to see this discussion right now. I understand the spam angle, but e.g. this question, stackoverflow.com/questions/25266909/…, I asked today is I think quite hard to answer with spam and if answers were allowed would become a great resource for programmers. –  Anne van Rossum Aug 12 at 16:01
    
@AnnevanRossum: Yeah, that's not even a recommendation question. I don't see the harm in it, but it's sort of tangential to what SO is about. I'm not really sure where to direct this question, but maybe try asking it on programmers.stackexchange.com? –  tmyklebu Aug 12 at 16:19
    
Thanks @tmyklebu. I think I am gonna ask my CTO, a mastodont from that early period of C, when he is back from holidays. He probably knows! :-) –  Anne van Rossum Aug 12 at 16:21

I have been exasperated repeatedly for having legitimate questions stomped by this particular policy. Had I known SR exists, there would be no problem.

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If you're posting software recommendation questions to SO then they're not "legitimate" questions, they're inappropriate questions. –  Servy Aug 13 at 14:18
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There's a vast overlap. Ever heard of "don't reinvent the wheel"? –  Ekevoo Aug 13 at 14:48

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