I've seen a few users on Meta recently who appear to be getting lynch-mobbed on the site after either posting an unpopular opinion here, or being the subject of a post because of their actions.

Example user 1 (let's call him Jim)

Jim answered a Meta question like this:

Stack Overflow is full of rude jerks and Egomaniacs who just want to make themselves feel all big and powerful by pushing around other users.

and proceeded to receive a bunch of downvotes on some of his unrelated questions on the main site:

Screenshot 2

Example user 2 (let's call him Bob)

Bob was the subject of a Meta post recently for sending the following offensive email to another user:

Y U edit my posts?! Don't you have anything better to do? Your website sucks and looks stupid! Why don't you learn to be a better programmer instead of trying to be a rep whore on Stack Overflow?

When this came to light, Bob started receiving a bunch of downvotes on his old, unrelated questions on the main site:

Screenshot 3

At first I dismissed these votes as being unrelated to Meta and just as normal main site activity, but after seeing these users' reputation history several hours later, it's clear that there is abuse going on here on the part of (some) Stack Overflow community members who should know better, and it's quite disappointing.

What are we doing?

One of the central tenets of this site is that we vote based on content, not on the owners of that content (including even any disagreeable behavior on the part of those owners). Yet here we are, apparently getting our "revenge" downvotes.

Why are (some) of us doing this? This is beneath us. The members of Meta are supposed to be the highest exemplars and greatest of role models for the rest of the Stack Overflow community, and yet we seem to be acting childish and petty. I was thinking about this in the comments earlier today: is it really active Meta members who engage in mob-downvoting behavior? Or is this behavior exhibited mostly by random, drive-by users who stumble upon Meta for the first time (through the Community Bulletin, for example), or who are infrequent visitors here? Or maybe it's an even mix of the two?

Regardless of who does it, the mob-downvoting on the main site, given when you merely express an unpopular opinion here on Meta (or take some kind of inappropriate action) is not ok.

Am I missing something here? Is what I'm saying unreasonable, uninformed, or misguided?

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I don't think you can really prevent it, but kudos for pointing it out. The problem is that topics brought up here are highly subjective, and this is one (albeit unfortunate) way of expressing an opinion on a particular topic. –  AstroCB Aug 8 at 18:26
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I've added "votes" because I think the meta effect can go both ways. Why didn't I add up-votes? I dunno!! Too many Meta-CupCakes –  Andrew Barber Aug 8 at 18:27
    
@AstroCB I still understand cupcake. While what you say is true and they only try to express their opinion by doing that, I think it's actually hurting the community by downvoting potentially good questions/answers for personal reasons. Might not be a solution, but different names/profiles for SO and metaSO? something to dissociate both accounts so people won't do that? I know it's not practical by the way –  Julldar Aug 8 at 18:28
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Umm, well that screenshotted one probably happened because you posted a link to that question in the Tavern requesting it be closed as a duplicate. I don't think the downvotes came because of the Meta post, but because the post sucks and you pointed it out for closure. –  animuson Aug 8 at 18:28
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@Cupcake Yes: that question wasn't exactly worthy of 30 upvotes... –  AstroCB Aug 8 at 18:34
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The "meta effect" has, of course, been happening for time out of mind. Scores get badly exaggerated vis-a-vis what you would have expected for that post in the absence of attention directed onto it from meta. –  dmckee Aug 8 at 18:38
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In my view, this is the general case on the main site in terms of contagious voting, up and down, anyways. The only difference is you draw attention to yourself by potentially the whole of overflow on Meta. On the main site people tend to hang around their tags. It will eventually stop when the majority of users don't participate in Meta at all. –  Chief Two Pencils Aug 9 at 4:41
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@ChiefTwoPencils I'm sorry, but I don't understand your comment at all, can you clarify please? –  Cupcake Aug 9 at 4:42
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I agree Cupcake, it's difficult to state anything without data and real context. But as there are real people associated with these data points and mob doesn't see the contents and discussions objectively, anonymity has to be used to safegaurd users. Lets see how this goes. –  Infinite Recursion Aug 9 at 9:30
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Punishment. I have had this also and can attest that it's discouraging and overall bad for the site. The naive user who sees down votes will conclude that the answer has no technical merit and does not understand the mechanics of Stack Overflow's punishment system. It's also discouraging that every time it's raised in Meta, the higher ups remain consistently in denial. –  Gayot Fow Aug 9 at 10:30
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@Cupcake - can you lock voting on it for a period? Kind of like suspending trading on a volatile stock? –  jww Aug 10 at 0:13
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@jww mods can lock a post of course, but what are they supposed to do, lock every one of the affected user's posts? How long are they supposed to lock them for? A week? That's an entire week of missed opportunities for legitimate upvotes as well. –  Cupcake Aug 10 at 0:15
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On Reddit, this is called vote brigading. When votes are worth nothing, this is inevitable. Assign a monetary value to votes, and this will no longer be a problem. Reddit attempts to get around this problem by disabling votes from the np.reddit.com domain. So if you link to a new np.stackoverflow.com, then voting will be disabled (if that feature existed). –  Chloe Aug 10 at 1:00
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@jww you're making suggestions to the wrong person, poke Shog about it. –  Cupcake Aug 10 at 6:41
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@adeneo additionally, being mob downvoted on the main site for merely expressing an unpopular opinion (or even an un-constructive one) on Meta can be a big turn-off for people, especially users with less rep than us. I see this as extremely harmful and counter-productive. –  Cupcake Aug 11 at 7:14

4 Answers 4

I got an even better idea: stop going after individuals because you don't like something they wrote. Not on meta, not on the main site, not in chat, and certainly not via email.

  1. Don't go through someone's posts just looking for something to downvote / close / delete.
  2. Don't throw their work up for ridicule in chat / twitter / meta.
  3. Don't try to "balance out" something you think they've done with similar sketchy actions of your own.

We can't stop folks from bringing up specific issues here on meta, and we wouldn't want to - that's one of the main reasons for which meta exists! But we can and we should strive to always make these discussions about the issue - the post, the action, the event - and not about a person. Because as soon as you stop trying to define the problem and start labeling an individual, you're inviting the mob to attack - regardless of whether or not that was your intention.

There are all sorts of different ways this can happen, but here are some red flags to watch for in your own writing:

  • Direct link to a user's profile.
  • Naming another user (rather than just describing a problem and linking to posts that illustrate it)
  • Pejorative terms like "vampire", "roboreviewer", "whore" or "php"

If you find yourself including these in your posts (or comments), stop and ask if you could conduct a productive discussion without doing so - if it turns out you can, then don't. Always be watchful for other signs that you're inadvertently encouraging others to behave badly. You can't stop a mob, but you can sure as hell avoid inciting one!

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'Pejorative terms like [...] "php" ::chortle:: –  dmckee Aug 8 at 18:51
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Shog for president! Best answer. Ever. Now if only every meta user would actually read and obey this answer... –  Kendra Aug 8 at 18:52
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@Shog: Did you see animuson's comment about what really happened in this case? Because that looks like it wasn't really targeted at the user, especially not through her answer on meta. –  Deduplicator Aug 8 at 19:18
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@Deduplicator the question already had several downvotes on it when I went to go look at the user's profile to check if she was still receiving downvotes on her posts. She was. A lot of those downvotes were already there before I linked to it in chat. My point was that it looked like someone else purposefully went digging through the user's profile for stuff to downvote. In the bigger picture, however, especially in my second example, I think it's clear that there is mob behavior going on here on Meta. –  Cupcake Aug 8 at 19:23
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Well, Cupcake is alarmist, but there is also a tendency for meta to generate attention @Deduplicator. Of course, you can generate plenty of attention by posting a link into chat too, which Cupcake also demonstrated. –  Shog9 Aug 8 at 19:46
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It would still be useful to get tools that aid in preventing it (anonymizing for example). –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 8 at 20:13
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@BenjaminGruenbaum: Those who really want to anonymize are already doing it..On the hand, some users are "inviting the mob to attack" by calling out users on Meta despite already having all the possible solutions earlier in another identical post. The answers were for every occurence of the incident –  Infinite Recursion Aug 9 at 4:08
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@InfiniteRecursion I spend considerable amount of effort "anonymizing" myself, I end up working in order to do it and then apologizing and asking in the comments to not make it about the specific user here ARE some examples . I believe anonymizing the post linked to should be the default in meta. Otherwise we usually end up witch hunting like OP described. –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 9 at 6:24
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When you post a link to a question/answer/comment/revision history/edit the usernames appear as "userXXXXXXX" and are not links? –  Benjamin Gruenbaum Aug 9 at 6:35
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If anyone is thinking "What about these Jon Skeet meta posts? Aren't they specific to a single user?". The answer is No! Jon Skeet is not a person, but rather an idea whose time has come! –  lostsock Aug 9 at 13:55
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What if we could create links that would go to "anonymized" pages. You could put the link under the "share" button in the question/answer. The question would have user-details removed but retain everything else. Wouldn't prevent the determined people from bandwagoning but would definitely help with "drive-bys". This would also make it easier to edit meta questions to be anonymous. –  Shoe Aug 10 at 1:31
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@Shog9: Even if you don't link to the person, people are going to visit their profile from the post page and attack them anyway. So it's all or nothing. –  BoltClock Aug 10 at 4:33
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My response to that is always, "Are you going to upvote decent posts too?" @JasonC. Because if not, then it's not really the same thing as organic votes, is it... –  Shog9 Aug 10 at 19:29
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Some people are going to do it anyway regardless of what I write, @Jason - that's why the bulk of my answer concerns strategies for not unintentionally encouraging it, rather than preaching at the folks who probably aren't reading this. –  Shog9 Aug 10 at 20:02
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I don't care how you find the posts as long as you're evaluating them based on the individual merit of each in context and not prejudice based on past impressions of the author, @tripleee - and yes, that's really hard to do sometimes, but if you can pull it off more power to you. Not a fan of going through profiles looking for a few posts to downvote (or upvote) and ignoring those that don't meet this criteria though. –  Shog9 Aug 12 at 4:18

One of the central tenets of this site is that we vote based on content, not on the owners of that content

But this is why. If a post gets discussed on meta, it gets a lot of attention from users who normally wouldn't be reading those particular search tags. They read the post, and then vote based on the post's content.

Now if there was something bad with the post, which might be the very reason it was brought to attention, the post itself will get mass down-voted.

The main problem is that meta is completely open to anyone, while there are various support requests with live posts as examples. If it was possible to raise such support requests to moderators only, we wouldn't be getting these side-effects. Now every such post indirectly tells the "dumb masses" to start pondering the linked material, and toss their subjective and/or inexperienced opinions into the discussion.

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It's the same reason we spend our lives bitching about crappy reality TV when, really, we wouldn't even know it existed if the dumb masses didn't keep supporting it. Just a consequence of big society; can't be fixed. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Aug 11 at 9:19
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No, this is not the kind of mob downvoting that I'm talking about. What I'm talking about is when a user expresses an unpopular opinion here on Meta (example, "Meta is full of A-holes and stupid Nazis!"), and subsequently starts to receive mass downvotes on their unrelated content on the main site. I've anonymized my examples above for this very reason. The users in question expressed unpopular opinions here on Meta, and started to become mass downvoted on the main site for it. Do you consider that to be ok? –  Cupcake Aug 11 at 15:45

I think the issue could be solved with money reputation.

When downvoting an answer, the answerer loses 2 points and the downvoter loses 1 point. The amounts are small, but the downvoter pays half what the answerer pays, and thus is reluctant to downvote for no good reason.

On the other hand, when downvoting a question, the OP loses 2 points and the downvoter loses nothing. The mechanism used to be that of the answers (with the downvoter losing one point), but was changed to encourage users to "judge" the worth of questions.

This change unfortunately opened the door to this kind of behavior: any user with the ability to vote can now bring down the reputation of any other user as long as they asked questions.

Maybe that we should review this decision:

  • either bring back the -1 for downvoting a question
  • or remove the -2 for having a question downvoted
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I believe -2 for downvoting question is fair. Because - it serves a goal to prevent people of asking poor questions many times. Should we add -1 for downvoter? - well, it's debatable. If we'll do that - yes, the case like in this topic may be resolved, but on the other hand, bad questions will get less downvoted (while those downvotes are well-deserved) and, therefore, would not be a reason for OP to think about - what's wrong (so it may in some way "promote" bad questions) –  Alma Do Aug 11 at 7:55
    
In particular, down votes need to weigh a bit more. If you get 10 rep for every up vote you receive, but lose nearly nothing for every down vote you cast, there is a rep inflation which encourages down voting in general. –  Lundin Aug 11 at 7:57
    
@Lundin: I am not sure the rep inflation is an issue, if we had a fixed amount of reputation shared among users, we would end up in a position similar to bitcoins where you start counting in fractions. However I do agree that I find it strange that an answer with 1 Up and 4 Down still gives reputation to the answerer. Personally, I would be up for 1 Up = 1 Down and having the downvoter pay half the price. –  Matthieu M. Aug 11 at 8:30
    
I'm for this, if and only if upvoting a question costs 1 rep as well. –  Wooble Aug 11 at 13:09
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Yes, we need to bring back the penalty for downvoting questions. –  Chris Stratton Aug 11 at 15:08

This needs a formula. Divide meta by time and throttle downvotes accordingly? Formula basically means if there is a lot of recent meta there can only be so many downvotes in the next x amount of time. Wouldn't this solution be appropriate?

To expand, if the mob-downvoting is due to positive attention within a short span of time then it would be possible to calculate the amount of good karma over the last number of hours, if this triggers a certain ratio then the restriction on negative meta can kick-in for a similar amount of time.

This wouldn't prevent users from downvoting, it would just limit the functionality to a certain number of users for a certain short period of time. In this way the throttle cant be abused because it is a formula set by the voting system and programmed into the backend. Does this make sense? Am I mis-interpreting the question?

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I think you might want to expand more on how this proposed solution is supposed to work. –  Cupcake Aug 11 at 15:20
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Throttling the down votes would leave that functionality open to abuse. Besides if I don't like a question why shouldn't my vote count because too many other people feel the same way already? I think it's a hard one to control, unless you can elaborate on your proposal - maybe I am missing some magic here? –  Scott Aug 11 at 15:24
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I'm not saying you wouldn't be able to downvote, just that only the next 'x' amount of users will be able to downvote the meta in the next 'x' period of time. This wouldn't be able to be abused because the throttle would be trigged by a ratio as explained above. It would have to be coded into the backend of SO. –  user43251 Aug 11 at 15:30

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