Notice: because this question has been generating off-topic comments, let me make this clear: this question is not about discussing claims that Stack Overflow culture appears to be "rude" or "negative". This question is about what to do with other questions and rants that seek to do just that.


A disgruntled user just posted this rant on Meta a few minutes ago:

Why does the Stack Overflow community seem to be so rude?

Okay, so I have been a programmer for 20 years, but I'm still learning newer languages, I know it says for professional and enthusiasts but still, the questions I ask aren't that easy to solve. Before I ask a question I always search the internet for answers, and if I don't find it, I ask it on Stack Overflow.

However, people start going off topic and just tell me rude things and joke about me. I know that's a general internet problem and really I could not care about it, but on websites like MacRumors people are nice.

Typically you'll see someone reply with, "Why would you want to do that? You're doing it wrong. Do it this way, here's how."

These replies infuriate me. I know what my problem is and I'm asking for an answer. I don't need a new problem to solve. I don't need to know what your opinion is about the code.

Several users soon closed it as a duplicate of the (infamous) Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late?.

In my opinion, that other question is just another rant, and although it has some reasonable answers, none of them really seem to be definitive to me. Well, maybe Shog's is, but it's not the accepted answer, nor is it the top scoring answer...ranting users are unlikely to bother to find it—"Too long, didn't read".

Should we really be closing a question like the one above as a duplicate of Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late? Is it productive and constructive for us to block off any chance for personalized answers for future disgruntled users? Is it helpful?

I don't know, I'm not sure, that's why I would like to open this up for discussion.

Note also that we always have the option of closing rants with the following instead:

Screenshot

This question does not appear to seek input and discussion from the community. If you have encountered a problem on one of our sites, please describe it in detail. See also: What is "meta"? How does it work?

...but I ask again, is it helpful to us, and other users, to do so? We could attempt to address a disgruntled user's rant through comments alone, but the Stack Exchange platform isn't really designed to support comment-based discussions very well.

Opportunities to educate misguided users

So this user's particular question actually originated on Meta Stack Exchange at first, where he received the following replies in the comments:

The rudeness is directly related to your perceived unwillingness to spend the time to read our community posting rules first; as your questions, while they may not have been bad per se, were blatantly off topic here. Then, if you will not read and follow our rules, you can reasonably expect negativity in return (of course it is not an excuse for rudeness but it is certainly not unexpected). Advice for improvement can be found in the gray description boxes appearing underneath your questions that were put on hold. You can also look at recent well-received questions as examples. — User 2

Wouldn't it have been helpful to the original poster to post answers demonstrating how he can improve his questions, and why he might have been getting the "rude"(?) responses that he claims that he was getting?

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I should note that I deleted that particular question because the comments (now deleted) were going a very dark and offensive direction. I don't think a constructive dialog was ever going to happen there. –  Brad Larson Jul 31 at 17:44
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I don't find blocking off helpful. That's why I cleaned up the question and replied to that rant. –  Infinite Recursion Jul 31 at 17:45
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@InfiniteRecursion so that you're aware, you did manage to slip in your answer during the close grace period, but since the question is now deleted, I'm not sure if the original poster would be able to see it. –  Cupcake Jul 31 at 17:48
    
@Cupcake, the OP probably didn't saw it. But I wouldn't be concerned of a user who was insulting people for no reason. –  Kyllopardiun Jul 31 at 17:50
    
@Kyllopardiun he had his reasons for insulting people, they just weren't acceptable reasons. –  Cupcake Jul 31 at 17:52
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FWIW, I don't exactly agree with the lock reason on, "Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late?". I understand it was shutdown to stop the shouting match between the groups who hate each other, but the "historical lock" reason doesn't quite fit. –  Mysticial Jul 31 at 18:08
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@Mysticial: The post is locked because it was closed and reopened several times. –  Robert Harvey Jul 31 at 19:48
    
Closed 6 times, to be exact. It still had pending reopen votes before it was locked for good. –  Cupcake Jul 31 at 19:53
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Does it matter if it's helpful? If it's a dupe, it's a dupe. Does responding to the same questions over and over change anything? You state that you don't know what should happen, but if you have 2 identical rants do you want to respond to both the same way? –  Ben Jul 31 at 20:53
    
It's the same with every "popular" question @mystical; they all end up either deleted or locked. I call it the reddit effect. As soon as something appears popular outside SE it causes a reaction that ends up in disaster, we'd much rather that popularity was organic. –  Ben Jul 31 at 20:56
    
@Ben Not necessarily. There's plenty on SO that are perfectly suitable and remain open/undeleted/unlocked. –  Mysticial Jul 31 at 22:16
    
I think this is a valid concern and a good post. Unless a discussion gets toxic, I think it's useful to preserve it. The particular topic of stackoverflow being not very friendly is not baseless either. Sometimes when I read people comments I get an impression that they came here not to help, but to vent at stoopid noobs expense. I perceive this is as very actual problem and shutting down discussions of it I do not think helps. –  zespri Aug 1 at 7:02
    
@zespri keep in mind that what I don't want to happen is that a misguided user walks away without at least an opportunity to learn about how Stack Overflow works, and how he or she can do better here in the future. I'm not interested in critiquing the ingrained veteran culture of Stack Overflow, because of course that topic has been argued to death for years. –  Cupcake Aug 1 at 7:06
    
If I had a Washington for every "closed as duplicate" that wasn't a duplicate, I wouldn't be posting about it right now. –  Chief Two Pencils Aug 2 at 7:38

1 Answer 1

Okay, I've got two possible solutions (and they're not mutually exclusive). They both entail creating community wiki, canonical questions, and using those to close duplicates.

Create a canonical question for "Why is SO so rude/negative/etc?"

Why is Stack Overflow so negative of late? does not make a good canonical question. It's just a giant shit show.

Thus, following the guidelines for non-ranting set out in How can I start a discussion critiquing the culture of Stack Overflow? and How do I participate in Meta and not die trying?, one of us, or a moderator (*cough* Robert *cough*) creates a community FAQ post that asks the basic question of

Why does the Stack Overflow community seem to be so rude and negative?

Then we leave a single answer in response. Then we'll probably have to lock the question, to prevent it from becoming an invitation for disgruntled users to air their grievances, just like in the original question.

Once this is created, we can start using it to close duplicates.

Create a canonical question to close other angry, non-constructive rants

Speaking of

why not use a canonical version of these for Meta SO to close angry rants in general as duplicates? This way we can point disgruntled users towards resources that will help them learn how to approach participation and discussion on Meta the right way.

Of course, we could always just shut down angry rants with

This question does not appear to seek input and discussion from the community. If you have encountered a problem on one of our sites, please describe it in detail. See also: What is "meta"? How does it work?

So I'm not sure how useful it would be to close rants as duplicates of questions explaining how not to rant instead.

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Interesting that you suggested Robert for writing the canonical rant. Lucky him :P –  Infinite Recursion Aug 1 at 15:34
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@InfiniteRecursion he always seems to be the one person who writes all the community wiki things. I think he might secretly enjoy it. –  Cupcake Aug 1 at 17:12
    
I don't know how I feel about this solution anymore :/ –  Cupcake Aug 2 at 14:57
    
Maybe you are now in the perfect mood to write the canonical rant yourself :) –  Infinite Recursion Aug 2 at 15:26
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The unhappy users will cheer up when they read Cupcake's solution...everybody likes confectionery.. –  Infinite Recursion Aug 2 at 15:29
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I recently posted a rant on Meta SO. I described it as being a flame, not a question, and knew perfectly well it was going to get closed, but just wanted to vent first. I don't see any harm in closing such things. –  Patricia Shanahan Aug 4 at 7:37
    
The canonical question idea always reminds me of this xkcd strip. –  Gerrat Aug 22 at 13:29

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