A few minutes ago, a question about "double compilation" was posted. The OP read an article claiming that passing an already compiled executable through GCC for a second time results in a 2x speed boost and asked how that was possible.

Double compilation is clearly impossible and the article is likely to be a hoax. But I realize that it might not be obvious to newbies, so I am uncertain whether:

  1. I should vote to close the question as off-topic for SO
  2. the question should be left open for people to learn about the hoax.

So, should I vote to close the question or leave it open?

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I think it's on-topic, so long as it's not way out in left field. Basically no different from a misconception that may need explaining. Certainly stupider questions get accepted on SO every day. –  Hot Licks Jul 26 at 19:27
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And thanks to @minitech findings, I could track down the Reddit post where the author reveals that it's actually a joke –  Stefano Sanfilippo Jul 26 at 19:37

3 Answers 3

up vote 40 down vote accepted

If such an article actually exists, then you should probably answer the question and point out why it's bunk (assuming it is).

If the article doesn't exist, then it's not a real question. Either close it as unclear and note that such an article should be linked to / cited so that folks can effectively answer the question, or close it as off-topic and write in something about pulling the one with bells on it.

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Or asking it again in Skeptics –  Braiam Jul 25 at 23:23
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Skeptics is gonna want a link/reference too... –  Shog9 Jul 25 at 23:31
    
I was only pointing out, that if such kind of questions where the questioner ask for the veracity/validity of the claim (is true that X compiler create magic powder), should be on topic or not. –  Braiam Jul 25 at 23:38

Whether or not the article exists the hoax/mistake is circulating. Otherwise the person asking the question would not have heard it.

It's worth debunking such obviously false claims, whether backed by an article or not...as we don't know how far the false information may have spread.

(Obviously something as ludicrous as that would not spread far as anyone who knows anything about how compilers work would be able to immediately spot it as false but other invalid claims are far more reasonable on the surface).

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It's a similar case to Which is faster: while(1) or while(2)?

Such questions should exist on SO, just to provide the reference to the future visitors that it's a hoax. A hoax must be demented publicly, because otherwise anyone googling for that hoax would find only the sites that "prove" it.

It's not hard to believe, even for an advanced programmer, that some tool may give better result when run second time. Unfortunately, the tools that give the other output each time they are run, or even are unable to run correctly at the first time, are getting more and more the normality.

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Actually, the while(1)/while(2) was not a hoax. My best hypothesis is that the interviewer wanted to test the confidence of the OP in the answer he gave ("there's no difference") or otherwise exercise a psychological trick on the OP. –  Stefano Sanfilippo Jul 28 at 18:22
    
He wanted to test it using a hoax, maybe :) –  Donaudampfschifffreizeitfahrt Jul 28 at 20:14

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