In looking on StackOverflow for help with some weird cross browser box-sizing behavior I was trying to debug, I came across an older question about the border-box property. While this question has a very highly voted answer which provided some helpful information, it also has this answer. While the "answer" in question has garnered (at this time) 48 upvotes, it is to the best of my reading a completely opinion-based piece of commentary only tangentially related to the question.

While the upvoters may agree with its editorializing, it makes no actual attempt (that I can discern) to address the question which had been asked. Maybe it's confusing since "Try using percentages and then adding 20px to each size" looks like a suggestion to the OP, but if you read closely, that isn't what's meant by it. The answerer is just musing on the merits of border-box, which weren't in question. Based on my reading of it, I flagged this as not an answer, as to my eyes it looks likes a lengthy comment at best.

To my surprise, this flag came back as not just declined but disputed. Based on the comments on this answer, I'm not the first person to view this as not an answer - am I wrong to think it ought to be flagged as such? Is there an accepted practice here of letting answers which don't meet the rules slide if they're highly upvoted? I just want to understand what I should or shouldn't be doing differently when it comes to assessing answers down the road.

share
4  
"Disputed" means that other users disagreed with your flag. "Declined" would have meant action by a Moderator. –  Fish Below the Ice Jul 24 at 17:50
    

1 Answer 1

"Not an answer" doesn't mean, "This isn't the correct answer." or "This attempted answer fails to adequately answer the question that is asked."

Not an answer means, "This person didn't even try to answer the question. Even they know that their answer isn't an answer to the question.

Examples make this pretty clear.

Let's say that the question is, "Why is the sky blue?".

Answers:

A clear cloudless day-time sky is blue because molecules in the air scatter blue light from the sun more than they scatter red light. When we look towards the sun at sunset, we see red and orange colors because the blue light has been scattered out and away from the line of sight.


There's actually a big shell over the entire planet that's painted blue.

(This may be wrong, but it's still an answer.)

Not answers:

I also want to know why the sky is blue


Have you found an answer to this question yet?


Thanks for your great answer Servy!


Click here for discount Gucci handbags!!!

(Although this is also spam, so you should really flag it as such, not as NAA even though it's not an answer.)


If you feel that someone has tried, and failed, to answer the question asked, didn't understand the question properly, that their answer was incomplete, etc. then you should downvote their answer, not flag it as Not An Answer.

share
    
But in effect, this answer seems to me like the answerer is, in your analogy, discussing whether blue is the best color for the sky or not. I just still don't see how this attempts to answer the actual question. –  sphanley Jul 24 at 17:56
2  
They didn’t try to answer the question. It’s a rant that just sort of agrees with it. “Why is the sky blue? I like red better.” “Yeah, red solves a lot of problems for me. Blue was a bad idea.” Not an answer. –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE Jul 24 at 17:58
    
@sphanley The fact that you think it fails to answer the question is a reason to downvote it. It's still an attempt to answer the question, even if it's a failed attempt. The author of that post feels that they are answering the question, you simply disagree. –  Servy Jul 24 at 17:58
    
The alleged non-answer has been deleted... –  ThisSuitIsBlackNot Jul 24 at 18:00
    
Interesting. I guess someone with some pull around here agreed with my read on things. –  sphanley Jul 24 at 18:00

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .