In the close dialog, this reason

Questions on professional server, networking, or related infrastructure administration are off-topic for Stack Overflow unless they directly involve programming or programming tools. You may be able to get help on Server Fault.

has a serial comma. However, this reason

Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it.

does not. Please add a comma after "library". It will save the world... or something.

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Or, please remove the comma after networking. –  Sam Jul 20 at 19:16
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Serial commas are the new pluralization bug(s?) of the re-born Stack Exchange network. –  The Paramagnetic Croissant Jul 20 at 19:40
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@Sam Using the serial comma would be consistent with other messages. e.g., the opinion-based reason. (based on opinions, rather than facts, references, or specific expertise.) –  Mooseman Jul 20 at 20:10
    
@user3477950 Ah, pluralisation. Wouldn't it be easier if it were as simple as "Guys, see this spoon? From now on, let's call it... a spoon." "But what if there's more than one?" "Then just put an S on the end! Spoons!" –  Niet the Dark Absol Jul 20 at 20:11
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-1 -- removing those useless commas would save one byte per message, which seems a much better result. Also, they really look strange or even incorrect to any non-British English speaker (e.g. in Italian you never put commas like that). –  Bakuriu Jul 20 at 20:21
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@Bakuriu American English often uses serial commas. Personally, I never omit them. Regardless, its use should be consistent amongst the close reasons. –  Mooseman Jul 20 at 20:25
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relevant... –  canon Jul 21 at 2:56
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@Bakuriu: "would save one byte per message, which seems a much better result" Yes, throw out every iota of any grammatical reason in favor of micro-optimization. But I don't want your drama if you really wanna leave out that Oxford comma... –  BoltClock Jul 21 at 3:13
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@Bakuriu, the missing serial comma is, to the best of my knowledge, a relatively new phenomenon introduced by American newpapers. The comma obviously belongs there to reflect speech patterns. –  dfeuer Jul 21 at 3:14
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@BoltClock while we're at it we should probably use the old-school neolithic approach of omitting all punctuation using mixed case also hinders compression a bit so we should skip that infactidontthinkwereallyneedspaceswecanjustputonewordafteranother –  dfeuer Jul 21 at 3:17
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@dfeuer and we cld do like evry1 does 2day & omit all caps & sum ltrs 2! bc we rly dont need them rite? –  Michael Hampton Jul 21 at 3:38
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I was taught to not use a comma before the "or" that introduces the last term –  Bohemian Jul 21 at 7:48
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@dfeuer Thai does that. Until you can recognize words, it confuses you to death. Also, because characters for sounds do not necessarily follow in ltr order for those sounds, one cannot do simple ltr pattern matching. My name, for instance would be spelled imk^el, where the e sits on top of the k. –  Michael Jul 21 at 15:57
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@TheParamagneticCroissant "Dear Next Person Who Opens a Serial Comma 'Bug', I will personally come to your house and bludgeon you to death with a giant ," I'm waiting for that tweet. –  The Guy with The Elf Hat Jul 21 at 21:22

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

professional server- or networking-related infrastructure administration

There. Fixed. That sentence was awkward anyway, and the serial comma certainly didn't help it .

The recommendation message is fine.

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Shouldn't it be "Questions on professional server or network-related..."? The hyphen after professional server looks incorrect. –  Infinite Happiness Jul 23 at 10:15
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@Infinite Recursion: It's correct - it means "professional server-related or network-related". The hyphen you see is called a suspended hyphen, and it joins "professional server" to "related" in the next hyphenated adjective so that "related" doesn't have to be repeated each time. –  BoltClock Jul 29 at 15:47
    
Thanks @BoltClock. I was unaware of suspended hyphens. It looks perfect now. –  Infinite Happiness Jul 29 at 16:31

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