I recently posted an answer to this question, and was dismayed to see that the asker accepted an answer that was (in my opinion) plain wrong. Briefly put, the question was asking whether SQL Server needed to be installed if an application was written to use it, and the accepted answer started with "No" in bold, and then proceeded to explain that actually, the answer was kinda yes.

As irritating as it was to see someone accepting a wrong answer, what happened next was weirder. The accepted answer began to attract downvotes and comments, and in response, the author of that answer edited it to include various clarifications that people were posting. They also quoted my entire answer verbatim at the top of their answer.

I'll admit, I'm a little annoyed at this, but my query here is more about the practice of improving already-accepted answers. If an accepted answer turns out to be wrong, but another answer on the question is correct, is the author of the accepted answer within their rights to replace the content of their answer with the correct information, or is that considered dishonest? I can remember one or two cases where I've posted an answer that's been accepted, and I've come back to add further information, so it feels like only a short step from there to correcting bad information, but when that information comes directly from someone else's answer to the same question, that starts to feel like plagiarism.

Full disclosure: I flagged the answer for attention, because it feels like bad etiquette, but I did not call for deletion, because in the end, the asker accepted it as correct, so I guess it must have helped them somehow.

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Improving one's answer is ok. But if the source of the improvement is a competing answer, the polite thing to do is to point that out. In this case (verbatim copying of an entire answer), failing to do so might even be a violation of the CC license that SE uses - "Attribution required". –  S.L. Barth Jul 18 at 9:02
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Yes, s/he literally copied your entire answer into their answer in the edit. The user seems to have done the same thing earlier. This answer is copied from this one. –  Infinite Happiness Jul 18 at 9:16
    
Infinite Recursion, do I mistake or these are almost identical threads? I think until 4th Answer is identical. What you posted were answers from same user in almost identical threads. Perhaps s/he did it before but not in those threads, so it's the same user. Kind regards –  Gödel77 Jul 18 at 11:10
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@InfiniteRecursion I don't think your "earlier" case is actually copying. It looks like they're just coincidentally similar obvious answers based on the question code. Also, the alleged copier's answer is still wrong in that case. –  Andrew Medico Jul 18 at 18:36
    
Considering your edit here, I must admit I might have been too quick to vote to delete, since the rest of the answer was actually answering the question. Even its initial revision said "No [... but ...] of course you will have to install the SQL-Server on a different machine if you want to be able to access any data at all". I've now voted to undelete. –  Bruno Jul 18 at 23:11
    
It didn't help them too much if they had to go back and copy your answer verbatim. Sounds like they were to passive to risk upsetting the poster of the accepted answer. You are the author, so as others have said, if someone does that they should do it the proper way and give credit where credit is due. IMHO, there's no way to do that reasonably with your answer right there on the page. You're the author flag it for attention, but this time declare it as plagiarism. I've had success getting posts deleted that were verbatim copies from MSDN user articles and such. –  Chief Two Pencils Jul 20 at 4:53
    
If you need to borrow someone else's answer to fix yours, you should clearly identify whose answer, with a link to their ID and a link to their answer — both readily available — and you should probably have the grace to convert your answer to community wiki (so you don't get more points from up-votes when you didn't provide the good answer), and you should request the OP to select the better answer as the accepted answer. When the accept has been changed, you might even delete your answer. –  Jonathan Leffler Jul 21 at 4:21

4 Answers 4

As Shog9 Pointed out:

Well... The alternative is to not improve the accepted answer, right? That's no good.

Copying other answers verbatim is pretty dodgy. That said, if you're gonna do it you gotta do it right: name the author, include a link, clearly indicate what was copied. See: http://stackoverflow.com/help/referencing

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Well... The alternative is to not improve the accepted answer, right? That's no good.

Copying other answers verbatim is pretty dodgy. That said, if you're gonna do it you gotta do it right: name the author, include a link, clearly indicate what was copied. See: http://stackoverflow.com/help/referencing

I've further edited that answer to conform with these requirements.

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Here, the referencing (although incomplete, without a link) had been done by the author of the answer directly. Are you suggesting that it's good practice for someone who isn't the accepted answer's author to edit it substantially like this to fix it? –  Bruno Jul 18 at 20:48
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@LegoStormtroopr Why did you incorrectly edit Shog's answer and forcefully reverse the attribution? That answer had correct attribution to this answer and you reversed it ! Shog is the original author, not KyleMit. If it's a joke, it's a very bad joke, leading to violation of copyright. –  Infinite Happiness Jul 21 at 5:34
  • If you are the author of the wrong answer that was accepted, fix it one way or another.

    If you realise you've made a complete mistake (which can happen to anyone) and there's a better answer, it's probably a good idea to delete your answer. Perhaps leave a comment to the asker to indicate you were wrong (I'm not sure they would be notified of a deleted accepted answer otherwise, besides the loss of acceptance point).

    If your answer can be salvaged, edit it. Point to the correct answer (preferably with the right link), or at least acknowledge the username of whoever pointed out your mistake (when there is no correct answer but just a comment). You might as well upvote the better answer while you're there.

    What was done in the case you mention was certainly a bit odd, since your entire answer was quoted. I would consider it bad etiquette to some extent, and I understand why this can be frustrating for you. However, it still said on top of it "Answer by anaximander:" and had your answer formatted as a block quote, so I wouldn't call it dishonest or plagiarism. The reference was missing the proper link indeed, but I'd guess the answerer assumed that your answer would be immediately visible below anyway (possibly not knowing that this can change if users change their username, since it comes from a new user). (Thanks to @Shog9, this was fixed.)

  • If you find a wrong answer that is not yours, in general, downvote it, leave a comment indicating briefly what's wrong or pointing to your own answer (if you have written one).

    If the answerer doesn't react, and if there really is a major problem with the accepted answer (maybe a security hole), perhaps edit their answer to leave a quick editor's note such as "[Editor's note: this answer is insecure since it is prone to SQL injections, please read other answers for a better fix.]" (or something along these lines).

    Do not edit someone else's answer to change its meaning. This is not what the edit button is for, it's for minor edits. The answer has the answerer's name next to it. It's not your job to make them say things they didn't say, and to confuse the authorship. This could certainly be against the CC licence too (readers shouldn't be expected to go through the list of revisions to find out who the real authors are). There is no co-authoring mechanism on Stack Overflow (unless going for community wiki), that's just the way it is. (I would generally think that slightly more substantial edits on questions are more acceptable, more particularly in cases where there is a language barrier issue.)

    Remember that what you consider the wrong answer may not actually be: you might be wrong in trying to fix another answer that is right (not necessarily the case in your example, of course). Besides misrepresenting the initial author, changing someone else's answer could lead to unnecessary edit wars.

    Getting the asker to change the accepted answer is trickier, since one of the golden rules of Stack Overflow is that only the asker can choose that. You can try to convince the asker by leaving a comment, but some askers never even log back on. It can be frustrating sometimes, but you might just have to live with that. (Although that rule is not perfect, it's not without its benefits: if forces answers to focus on the actual problem asked in the question, at least in a way that's meant to help the answer.)

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"Perhaps leave a comment to the asker to indicate you were wrong (I'm not sure they would be notified of a deleted accepted answer otherwise, besides the loss of acceptance point)." Probably not, so better to post that as a comment on the question (and then go back and delete it a day or two later). –  T.J. Crowder Jul 20 at 11:16

If your Answer is wrong, and you don't think that it is the right thing to try to improve it, then I suggest that you do the following:

  1. Edit it to make it clear that you think it is wrong.
  2. If the OP doesn't "unaccept" after a suitable period, then flag it for moderator attention, asking them to to delete it for you.

(I have done this once or twice for my own Question, and once or twice where the person who wrote the Answer clearly wanted the Answer deleted. But I wouldn't try this on someone else's Answer where it wasn't clear. The moderators would rightly "decline" that.)


@Bruno wrote:

Do not edit someone else's answer to change its meaning. This is not what the edit button is for, it's for minor edits.

I have (once) found it necessary to go against that advice. There was an (accepted) answer that was dangerously and egregiously wrong, and the Answer's author did not respond to comments saying that he / she should fix it. When he / she didn't respond, I edited the answer to <strike> the dangerously wrong sentence. Then I added a new sentence explain, and "signed" with my account name and the date.

Nobody complained ....

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Indeed, I can agree with that, as long as you make it clear that the edited content does not come from the initial author (without having to go through the revision history). (Can you not delete your own answer yourself, even if it's accepted, by the way?) –  Bruno Jul 20 at 16:13
    
@Bruno - No you can't. I guess that the rationale is that the OP loses reputation points when you do this. –  Stephen C Jul 21 at 3:45

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