I think I am correct in saying that you would not take the time in answering a question if the question was not useful and clear, or didn't show any research effort.

Basically, you will answer a question if it is clear and useful, or showed research effort. It would seem like only a handful of answers are to questions that don't have that property.

So then, the author that answered a question, should automatically have that question up-voted

I have seen several times where posters seemed to have put a lot of research effort into a question, and tried to make it clear and / or useful as possible. They would get an answer, however, the answerer would never upvote my question - zero upvotes; I have also seen that for me, too.

That seems like a disconnect. You wrote an answer to help find a solution and to receive the reputation from the asker, and those that like your answer. However, you don't upvote for a question you took the time and effort to answer. From which would not have been answered had it been a bad question - little effort, unclear, not useful.

So I suggest that for every answer, if the answerer had not up-voted the question, then it should automatically be upvoted

If you feel like it does not deserve an upvote, then you might be presented with an AJAX display that will allow you to unvote for it (for example).

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No, some questions are answerable but show very little research and are of low quality. These questions should be downvoted even if you can post an answer to them. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 17 at 11:50
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That is why I stated...**"If you feel like it does not deserve an upvote, then you might be presented with an AJAX display that will allow you to unvote for it (for example)."** –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 17 at 15:05
    
as @MartijnPieters said, some questions are answerable. I don't have much code experience but if I can answer a question I'm going to answer it regardless of how poor the question is. –  Noob Jul 18 at 13:53
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@ChristopherRucinski: you are making an incorrect assumption however. I disagree that questions deserve to be upvoted just because they are answerable. That assumption is wholly incorrect. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 18 at 14:01
    
@ChristopherRucinski: Questions should be upvoted because they are helpful to someone. Answering a question doesn't make it helpful to the answerer, however. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 18 at 14:01
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@MartijnPieters I posted this comment to the answer below..."if you don't like the idea of auto-vote, then present them with some dialog that would remind them that if they believe the question should be upvoted, then they should. What is wrong with that? Some people forget to vote, why not remind them?" –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 18 at 16:26
    
@ChristopherRucinski: That'd only be needed if there was a systemic problem with questions not receiving enough votes. I don't think that that is the case at all. And again, those that answer may not find the question to be helpful. Question votes come mostly from others that ran into the same problem and found the question to be helpful. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 18 at 16:28
    
Keyword...think –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 18 at 16:29
    
@ChristopherRucinski: Then prove me wrong. Right now it is my opinion against yours. I feel I have a lot more experience on the site than you have, however, so you'll have to come up with numbers here. –  Martijn Pieters Jul 18 at 16:30
    
@MartijnPieters meta.stackexchange.com/questions/9508/… Around 70% of questions have 0 - 2 upvotes. Around 50% have just 0 - 1 upvotes. That leaves a remaining 30%, but there are questions with negative votes. So the number of questions with atleast 3 upvotes is very small. –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 18 at 18:07
    
@MartijnPieters I just seen this, but it has also been noted that that "[t]he work flow doesn't promote voting for questions the way it promotes voting for answers. One solution: when a user answers a question, the system should invite them to vote for the question. If someone cares enough to answer a question, then they care enough to vote for it as well." –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 18 at 18:08
    
@ChristopherRucinski: And why is that a problem? Perhaps that means that too many questions suck instead? –  Martijn Pieters Jul 18 at 18:08
    
And why cannot there not be a pop-up that says something like. Hey, you answered this question, why don't you double check to see if the question deserves an upvote. That is good for the community, and makes sure everyone gets what they deserve for reputation. Or at least tries better. If you don't believe it does, then good for you, just leave afterwards. –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 18 at 18:13
    
that has been done for people that downvote - meta.stackexchange.com/questions/135/… –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 18 at 18:14
    

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There's two questions one might ask themselves prior to writing an answer:

  • Do I have the technical ability and time to help the author?
  • Is this a good question for the site? Is it likely to help anyone else?

Those can be mutually exclusive, and I wouldn't want to force folks to give their stamp of approval on a question where it wasn't truly earned. If someone manages to get help from our site once in a while in a manner where no lasting contribution is left - well, we can deal with that. They'll be back, hopefully with something that is worth keeping around. If they keep taking without giving, they soon find their ability to take extremely curtailed.

I will generally up-vote something that I answer, but I also tend to edit questions that I answer. An up-vote without an edit on something 'meh' isn't going to be good for the site, but a great answer might inspire someone else to improve the question and up-voted it.

It doesn't just all fall on one person, lots of people give in little increments. I'd be more interested in a way to encourage folks to edit questions they answer when the question is zero or negatively scored and been seen more than 20 times and around long enough to have earned some votes. If you answer the question and edit it, I'd think you'd be more likely to send it off with a good luck vote.

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That is why they should be presented with some display that would allow them to unvote. Or if you don't like the idea of auto-vote, then present them with some dialog that would remind them that if they believe the question should be upvoted, then they should. What is wrong with that? Some people forget to vote, why not remind them? –  Christopher Rucinski Jul 17 at 15:08

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