There's a number of Q&A in SO that were given in the form as we're used to see in regular FAQs.

The question itself is often intentionally (or by chance) broad. But usually the answers are helpful, especially for new users that haven't done much research effort before writing their own questions.

Here are some samples

Some people seem to believe that such questions should be closed, as for the mass of answers there targeting various situations, and being way too broad (thus not useful).

Are they right at all?

I personally believe such Q&A have their value, and the whole mechanism of marking duplicates (that don't exactly replicate the duped questions situation, but contain an answer for it), would be put in question.

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marked as duplicate by lpapp, Raedwald, zessx, Martijn Pieters, user1690588 Jul 16 at 12:26

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
A tricky subject. On the one hand, I like having questions like these around because they can be a trigger for some really great answers. OTOH, expecting anyone to deliver such answers in enough depth to properly cover the topic is unrealistic and borderline rude. If someone is really in the mood to write such an answer, a self-answered Q&A is an option. –  deceze Jul 16 at 10:28
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Yes, and those are fine IMO. Yes, technically the Q may be "too broad" and should be closed according to the strictest letter of the law. But come on, we're not going to throw out great content provided for free just because of that. That's a letter-of-the-law vs. spirit-of-the-law interpretation, where spirit should always win. –  deceze Jul 16 at 10:40
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@deceze To be clear, I'm absolutely sharing your opinion, that closing such questions is just a whacky idea. That's why I'm asking this. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 16 at 10:43
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By any chance does "FAQ" mean "canonical question"? When I saw "FAQ" I thought that you were referring to the FAQ stuff you see on Meta SE... –  user3580294 Jul 16 at 10:48
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Re: intention. I don't think most of the C++-faq questions were created with the intention of close-voting duplicates, but rather to prevent creation of the putative duplicates in the first place. So they add enormous value. –  TemplateRex Jul 16 at 11:25
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@FinalContest I disagree with the duplicate. I had an intentionally different focus here. Not so much about trying to write new canonicals, but if already existing ones should be closed as too broad, like you propose. –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 16 at 11:27
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@FinalContest Rolled back your edit. I choose my words consciously! –  πάντα ῥεῖ Jul 16 at 11:47
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(edit squabble) is it just me that can't see a huge difference between "too broad" and "overly broad"? I really can't get excited about either version of the edits, so to my mind, the OPs version is fine. –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 12:04
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@FinalContest nobody is quoted; nobody is cited; your profile lists Cambridge, UK as your location - in which case I'm pretty sure we're using roughly the same dictionary (although I'm a few hours drive west of you) –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 14:13
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@FinalContest you're tilting at windmills; this is not a useful conversation, IMO –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 14:39
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@FinalContest without something that claims to be a quote (or even a paraphrase), there is no misquote. The OP's statement is a correct and valid expression of the intent. –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 14:51
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@FinalContest nobody is citing you or quoting you; the expression "some people" is not in the singular. I'm not telling you what you intended to say; I'm saying that you're interpreting a wider statement as though it were all about you. –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 14:57
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@FinalContest I'm done here; again - you're arguing about a silly unnecessary choice of words that are synonyms. The edit rollback is valid and stands. Re the threads: yes - and you are only in one of them. –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 15:01
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@FinalContest you are out of line here; please stop being objectionable –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 15:04
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@FinalContest to show willingness to learn and educate myself, I have opened this: english.stackexchange.com/questions/185395/… –  Marc Gravell Jul 16 at 15:13

1 Answer 1

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The spirit of the too-broad close reason is that the question covers so many topics or one topic so large that it's unreasonable to expect a useful answer covering everything in sufficient detail. It should be applied to questions such as "How do I write a program that does X, Y and Z?". The answer to that is either a high-altitude overview of the structure of such an application, which may or may not be a constructive answer, or pages and pages of code hand-written for the OP (which we ain't gonna do). If the OP requires a high-altitude overview to get started, he should say so explicitly and that may be a good question. The latter case we're not even going to look at.

As such, evaluating such a question is tricky and should be done carefully. Figure out what the OP really wants and evaluate if an answer is productive and reasonable. Also see here.

Now, if the question is part of a useful* self-answered Q&A, there's no question that it should stay open. Are we going to throw out great content provided for free because we take every rule by the letter? Use your noggin. The rules are there as a guideline to serve the purpose of keeping SO running effectively, they're not a goal onto themselves.


* @FinalContest brings up the point of when such a question is not useful here. To which I'll say again: use your noggin. Canonical FAQs are useful in general and have served a purpose for a long time on SO. Not everything is suitable to be in this format though. There's no general answer for this, it needs to be decided on a case-by-case basis.

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"Now, if the question is part of a useful self-answered Q&A" - the key word here is useful, not self-answered - it doesn't matter if a canonical reference question is answered by OP, another user, or many users in form of a community wiki answer. All that matters is that it is on-topic and useful. And these questions can of course be tremendously helpful, if there was no generic "What's a NullPointerException" question then somebody would have to create one. –  l4mpi Jul 16 at 11:31
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@FinalContest the linked questions are from 2009, 2011 and 2012 respectively, how is that "new"? Also, a question doesn't have to be the first to be the canonical one, just the best one. –  l4mpi Jul 16 at 11:40
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@Final I don't get what exactly you understand to be "modules" or "environments" or "gods". I'm thinking of the thousands of "How do I sort my array?" questions we encountered every day before we had stackoverflow.com/q/17364127/476. It doesn't help anybody answering those individually with custom code every time. The topic is trivial if you get explained how sorting works once, then everyone can apply that to their own situation. There was no sufficiently canonical canonical before, because each question wasn't broad enough. –  deceze Jul 16 at 11:43
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@FinalContest facepalm at yourself or at something supposedly stupid in my comment? Because I have absolutely no idea what you're talking about; only that it doesn't fit the question posted here and the questions linked by OP. –  l4mpi Jul 16 at 11:44
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@Final We're talking about questions in the context of SO here, not about C++. If you have a beef with a particular broad answer of a particular C++ topic, then say so and maybe discuss that in particular. There's always the necessity to talk about individual examples. However, that's not what we're doing here right now. We're talking about FAQs in general. –  deceze Jul 16 at 11:49
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@Final That duplicate pretty much echoes what I'm saying as well. It seems to me that talking in abstracts doesn't help you, because the particular case you're talking about is somewhat special and doesn't fall within the majority of FAQs. –  deceze Jul 16 at 12:11
    
@deceze: I agree, it simply is too broad. –  lpapp Jul 16 at 12:20

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