I have noticed that some users, when they delete an answer (for whatever reason), also replace the content with something along the lines of

deleted deleted deleted deleted

I'll refrain from posting a link so as to not embarrass the >100K rep user whose deleted answer inspired this question :-)

Is this an acceptable practice?

I have on occasion deleted my own answers that turned out to be wrong or not as good as others, but have never felt the need to destroy the answer.

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Experienced users are even more sensitive about covering their tracks when they post something dumb. I don't see why the practice shouldn't be acceptable, seeing as deleted content is by definition not supposed to be seen. –  Pekka 웃 Jul 14 at 20:18
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The content is still there in the revision history, so it's not like you can't see it if you want to, it's just not as visible. –  Servy Jul 14 at 20:20
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They're not really destroying anything, since the original content is still going to be visible in the edit history. –  Andrew Medico Jul 14 at 20:20
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I have seen this in the past on deleted answers. I guess they don't want 10K+ users to see the answer. The edit functionality on a deleted post wasn't meant to be used this way, but since it is deleted it used to sort of virtually write through your answer and destroy evidence. And since it is deleted, they really won't get in trouble for it –  staticx Jul 14 at 20:20
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Removing the content has the added benefit of reducing the amount of screen space that the deleted answer takes up (for those who can still view it), which is actually quite helpful for longer answers. It also reinforces the fact to those users that the answer was not relevant and no attention should be paid to it. –  animuson Jul 14 at 20:22
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@animuson Although the irony of the situation is that by trying to hide it curious 10k users may end up being more likely to want to actually read the answer. –  Servy Jul 14 at 20:24
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There is the ever so slight advantage that the answer is less likely to draw a Google hit. –  Hot Licks Jul 14 at 20:27
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@HotLicks Google's web crawlers don't have 10k rep...and they're not moderators. –  Servy Jul 14 at 20:34
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@HotLicks Google won't find it. That's the whole point of my comment. Google's crawlers won't see deleted posts in the first place, and so couldn't ever direct someone to a deleted answer. –  Servy Jul 14 at 20:41
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And they have no sense of irony either. –  Hot Licks Jul 14 at 20:45
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I've had an argument once with an OP who was such a dick that I deleted my answer (I don't even remember whether it was right or not). He just didn't deserve my answer anymore and I deleted it and 'destroyed' its contents in a fashion like this. In vain, of course, since OP probably didn't have access to the deleted answer anyway and if he did, he probably could see the revision history as well. Well, anger is a poor adviser, and yet it felt good at the time. –  GolezTrol Jul 15 at 13:01
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If you do this quickly enough it doesn't seem to show up in the edit history. –  canon Jul 15 at 13:16
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Well, next time we have a moderator election, I'm going to nominate one of Google's crawlers. –  David Wallace Jul 16 at 0:09
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@GolezTrol the whole point of Stack Overflow is that it's a resource of benefit to future users, who have the same questions as the users of today. In other words, an answer is NOT just for the OP - it's for loads of people who are facing the same issue as the OP, or will face the same issue in days to come. It's really a shame that you felt compelled to withhold your answer from all of those people, just because one person was obnoxious. –  David Wallace Jul 16 at 0:11
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@DavidWallace I know, right. But I don't think the world will end because of that one answer. I've got over 2000 other answers for the world to enjoy, and if someone else needs that same question answered, they can ask it again, and maybe I will even be the one that answers it again. –  GolezTrol Jul 16 at 6:01

7 Answers 7

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Sure, why not? Nothing of value is lost when you destroy an incorrect answer.

(Note that I'm biased. I've done this a couple of times when I was so far off base that it seemed like I was answering the wrong question entirely.)

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In the Teacher's Lounge (where everyone has mod privileges), the one way to make sure that everyone reads a post is to delete it. –  Robert Harvey Jul 14 at 20:44
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Mostly for the sake of argument: you could be losing some value if the incorrect answer is something that's likely to quickly come to mind to others, and/or might superficially seem correct. Then future visitors wouldn't learn from the wrong-ness. Though that applies mostly to vandalism that isn't accompanied by deletion. –  Pops Jul 14 at 21:16
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@Pops - Well if it was that valuable it shouldn't be deleted either. –  Martin Smith Jul 14 at 21:18
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@Pops Agreed. There is value in some wrong answers, just not the embarrassingly wrong ones. :) –  Bill the Lizard Jul 14 at 22:45
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I once got into a ko battle with someone who kept undeleting my deleted content. Not sure what to do about that kind of thing. –  matt Jul 15 at 19:22
    
@matt Flag for moderators. –  Qix Jul 15 at 19:56
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There is also value in destroying an answer: You don't waste other people's time by making them think about something which didn't work. Value in the attempt is only there if it shows how one might approach a problem and why it didn't work in the end - maybe the 100K+ users won't delete that. But if you just misread/-understood the question, why waste other people's time? –  Daniel Frey Jul 15 at 21:37
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Sometimes, the content of the answer is lost: When it's been destroyed during the grace period. –  Bergi Jul 15 at 23:19
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@matt You can disown the answer by making it Community Wiki. If you also "destroy" it, the next person's rollback edit will make their name appear as the "most substantial contributor". –  Marko Topolnik Jul 16 at 7:38
    
I like lizards. –  devnull Jul 16 at 17:23
    
A strategy I like is to cover my tracks when I say something dumb by replacing it with something short, correct, insightful, but completely irrelevant. I figure there's way less of a chance of somebody looking at the edit history than if I write "DELETED. DON'T READ ME, I'M A MONSTER." –  Jason C Jul 19 at 20:52

No, it's vandalism.

Stack Overflow has decided that 10k+ users should be able to see deleted answers (whether we agree with this decision or not is irrelevant) but you're violating that decision by defacing posts.

As a 10k+ user, your deleted post is every bit as real and visible as a non-deleted one, so my annoyance at seeing a useless .....deleted it was wrong..... block is every bit as real and visible as it would be if you'd done it to a non-deleted post.

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Is it acceptable? Why not? Perhaps it's in knowing civil disobedience. Why shouldn't an OP be allowed to delete (and not just hide) their own content at any time? I've not been able to find a reason against self-deleting content in our official FAQ or docs (is there one?).

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Aw, nuts. Why the downvotes? I was guessing about the civil disobedience, and I was honestly unable to find in the FAQ a stated reason for not allowing users to delete their answers (if we have a documented reason, please share). –  janaspage Jul 20 at 3:24
    
I read the OP's question as, "Why does this happen, and is it OK to do?" –  janaspage Jul 20 at 4:15
    
If you were new to Meta, note that downvotes here aren't like on normal Stack Overflow. –  Veedrac Sep 6 at 4:11
    
Thanks for replying, @Veedrac. I still would expect downvotes without comment to be inappropriate, as seems to be par throughout SE and other forums. Yes, this was my first interaction with Meta, and I did not return following the cold welcome my differing viewpoint received. But again, thank you for your conversation. Cheers. –  janaspage Sep 6 at 18:49

As a 10k user, your view of the page changes radically... suddenly there's lots of red stuff on the page. Especially in questions that have lots of deleted answers (well, thats the red stuff).

deleted stuff

Thats a lot of vertical scrolling space that has been taken up by one owner deleted answer (there's one more above this one, and two more under it).

By changing the text to something that only takes up one line, your mistake is not quite as obvious on the page and easier to scroll past by other 10k users. Sometimes its just "deleted", other times its "My answer was just wrong for this case." Either way, it can save a lot of vertical space that is visible to 10k users. They can still poke at the edit history if they're curious about the contents, but the random perusal of question doesn't have this big red thing taking up much of the screen.

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Interesting insight. –  janaspage Jul 20 at 3:25

Incidentally, Jeff Atwood suggested exactly this strategy years ago, as a way of removing embarrassingly-incorrect answers in a way that wouldn't confuse / annoy 10K users.

Our more experienced / savvy users do this within the 5-minute grace period, thus fulfilling the spirit of this old feature-request by leaving no trace of the original answer, even to 10K users.

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True. But the 5-min grace period seems to itch when such answers transform into fantastic ones especially after a couple of other reasonable answers show up. –  devnull Jul 16 at 17:26
    
Not sure why keeping old revisions is mututally exclusive with edit the body of the now-deleted answer to say something like "oops, I don't know what I was thinking here, my apologies" The explanation version is still there, and it's the first thing shown to 10k users. –  Ben Voigt Nov 2 at 15:54

It's fine; it's just pointless, that's all (given the presence of an Edit History). The only way you can completely obliterate an answer is if you do it during the first grace period (within 5 minutes of posting).

If a person is really embarrassed about an answer, the right way to deal with it is for the poster to ask for their name to be disassociated with the post, although it's hardly worth it for most posts (you'd have to post something really offensive to someone's sensibilities to justify a disassocation).

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Amusingly... I once posted an answer I was embarassed of... Asked the mods to disassociate myself from it... only to promptly have the answer get something like 20 upvotes (on smaller non-SO site so that's not a small # :) –  DVK Jul 15 at 1:45
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That's a thing? You can ask for your name to be disassociated with a post? –  Mehrdad Jul 15 at 7:38
    
@DVK Did you get reputation for all those up-votes even though your name was disassociated? –  J-Dizzle Jul 15 at 19:46
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@Mehrdad: It's required by CC:Wiki. Try not to make it a habit, though; disassociation is expensive (someone at SE corporate has to do it). Better to not post the thing that you want no part of in the first place. –  Robert Harvey Jul 15 at 19:49
    
@RobertHarvey: Yeah I understand, just found it interesting. Thanks. –  Mehrdad Jul 15 at 20:05
    
@J-Dizzle: you don't, it shows up with a random "userXXXXXXX" name, just like posts which still exist after an author's account is deleted. –  Qantas 94 Heavy Jul 17 at 10:10
    
Why does this have to be done by someone at SE Corporate? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jul 25 at 10:22

I suspect that the person who deleted their answer probably posted something very silly and doesn't want anyone to see that they posted it.

The writer of the answer probably came to the decision that there's nothing about the answer worth preserving, and you probably shouldn't worry too much about it.

You don't need the juicy details about whatever the person originally wrote in that box.

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In this case the deleted text was innocuous, as shown by the edit history. –  Jim Garrison Jul 14 at 20:20

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