I just got down voted because my answer was correct but inefficient (another answer showed that something could be done in O(n). my answer did it in O(n^2). Now, the question didn't mention - this should be done in O(n) . So, I gave the first(and perhaps the simplest) solution.

My question is simple (and I completely agree with the down voter that my answer is indeed inefficient). Is it fine to down vote a correct answer because it is inefficient?

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People can vote as they want, correct answer or not. –  bluefeet Jul 11 at 12:30

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

People are free to downvote as they wish.

If they think that your answer is flawed, then even more so.

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Sure, people can vote as they wish, but clearer guidelines would do no harm. I had an interesting discussion about this in this now deleted answer with someone who downvotes answers that are "not useful" in the sense that another answer posted later is more useful. "Not useful" as a downvote tooltip can be ambiguous. (I personally only downvote answers that are incorrect, misleading, insecure or plainly a bad idea, not the ones that say something interesting, but possibly not enough.) –  Bruno Jul 11 at 12:42
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@Bruno - the guidelines are there, in the tooltip on the voting buttons. They are vague on purpose. –  Oded Jul 11 at 13:09
    
Sure, but there are so many ways to interpret "This answer is not useful". Excessive downvoting of answers that are still valid doesn't necessarily help. –  Bruno Jul 11 at 13:12
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@Bruno Valid doesn't mean useful. I can write valid HTML, but only semantic HTML is useful. Closer to the topic, if your solution runs in n^2 but they have 10M objects to run, then it isn't useful anymore, at least not as long as an O(n) solution exists. –  ABMagil Jul 11 at 13:31
    
@ABMagil, oh absolutely, but the example you give goes into the "bad idea" category, so would deserve a downvote. I'm just talking about answers that are correct, not bad ideas, but maybe not the best amongst the few answers provided, i.e. "not useful" in the context of a second answer that appeared later but doesn't invalidate it. –  Bruno Jul 11 at 13:36

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