This answer does a fair enough job explaining why you can't vote-to-close on a question once you've retracted a close vote. But I'm curious, why can't I change my close-vote reason without retracting my close vote?

For example, this question started as a question that was too broad. There wasn't enough detail in the question to do anything more than guess at the appropriate answer. I downvoted, voted-to-close, and then left a comment explaining why the question needs improvement.

It was then edited in response to my comment to include more detail making it more clear what was being asked about, but it was my feeling that the question still needed to be close, but now for a different reason: it's now a duplicate.

As of this writing, it's 1 close vote away from being closed. It'll likely be closed, but the question already have 3 close votes before it was clear that the question was a duplicate, so when the question is closed, the official close reason is unlikely to be because it's a duplicate.

Why is my only option to retract my close vote? Why do I not have an option to change my close vote reason now that the question has been edited from one closable problem to another?

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Sometimes I close a question by mistake and than I've to do nothing but retract my vote, it would be nice if they provided to change the close vote reason, atlease once should be allowed –  Mr. Alien Jul 5 at 6:16
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maybe be a bit less trigger happy on the close vote to begin with. –  tcaswell Jul 5 at 15:41
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@tcaswell That's not particularly helpful. You're basically arguing that I shouldn't ever vote to close because it's possible that the question will later be edited into something that invalidates my close vote (but leaves the question in a state that should still be closed). Even after the edit from "unclear" to "duplicate", it's possible the user could edit again out of "duplicate" but into "too broad" or some other category. –  nhgrif Jul 5 at 17:51
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Related: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/262761/… –  nhgrif Jul 6 at 14:27
    
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@GolezTrol Not a duplicate at all. In fact, I point to that and directly explain how and why this question is different. –  nhgrif Sep 14 at 14:56

4 Answers 4

Because the simplest implementation for this would be to allow you to retract and then re-apply your close vote.

And allowing that would allow you to circumvent the close vote aging mechanism, the close review system, and probably other things that assume one vote per person per post.

The other way to implement this would be a new tool that lets you "edit your vote" in place without actually creating a new vote. That's probably feasible, but a lot of work for an edge-case.

Given the common need for this involves duplicates, it probably makes more sense to design a system that allows adding / editing duplicate links without the overhead of the rest of the close system. Such functionality could also be useful in cases where the question was already closed, where a better duplicate was identified later on, etc.

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"Editing" your vote is a lot closer to what I'm talking about. And I'm only talking about cases in which the post has been edited since your close vote casting. If the user saw 3 close votes and read comments explaining the close votes, so he deleted his post and posted a new question which resolved that close problem but created another, I'd be able to "re-vote" on the new one for a new reason, right? How is this drastically different from the user completely rewriting the existing question and me changing my close vote reason? –  nhgrif Jul 8 at 11:21
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It's not an edge case, IMO. –  Robert Crovella Sep 28 at 22:37

You are correct at least speaking normatively (on the lines of it should be). The only difficulty I feel comes in implementing it. I don't disapprove of the proposal.

If you would have had closing rights for quite some time, you would know that the reasons showed for closing the questions have changed. The earlier reasons displayed were not accurate enough were or too one-sided (only few were widely used). This is the part I am not sure of. So this becomes a much larger issue. The decision not to change vote reason was to prevent users from selecting newer reasons to older closed/closing questions.

The second take from this is that reasons for close vote can change (and must if have to) in future. You always should use reasons currently available. So changing them between epochs (age of seperate reasoning) can't be allowed. I may be shooting down my own point. But to solve this you could have epochs and process them selecively to solve this. I am also not sure if something like this is implemented or not.

Lets say if you have a change of reasons. This will lead to two consequenses:

  1. If you have different epochs, you must process them differently. Which means sepearately managing epochs, each having different codes. Also other features can be changed between epoch efficiently.

  2. If not, you must update necessary changes for all of the questions. So that they all behave same.

You need either one or both or a combination of both approaches to solve it. Neither being simple to do if not done already. Which is why I think it starts hurting to change. The added complexity counts against the feature.

Other than that I can only say that closed questions are not worth this much effort. If they are worth it they are opened again at which point there is no need. What you describe could be a corner case. There can be multiple close reasons being valid simultaneously. What if both reasons are valid. You are only changing the one which is most accurate but other still counts.

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Why should changing to a modern close-reason be wrong? Anyway, I read the question as being about changing your specific reason before it is closed, and there's a huge difference between a question closed as duplicate, for scope/clarity or for topicality. The first one is finished successfully, the second might be salvageable, the third cannot ever be salvaged. Also, for duplicate the exact duplicate selected matters. –  Deduplicator Jul 7 at 12:20
    
I'm not really following this, but if getting close reasons right is "not worth the effort", then why are we closing/reopening questions to begin with? We have lots of time -- that's the point of a community-moderated system; with enough people participating the reason "not worth it" should infrequently be justified. SO should exist in a fashion that it is possible and easy for the community to maintain content quality themselves. Generallly speaking, maintaining quality should always be desirable. –  Kirk Woll Jul 8 at 1:39

The given close reason now is wrong. If we would be going according to the book it would have to be reopened and then closed (according to the linked Answer to another question) by other people because everyone only has one close reason per question.

However questions rarely get reopened from my experience when they are improved after being on hold. So if this question should be closed then not doing anything will result practically in the desired state, however with the wrong reason.

A comment is been given indicating the possible duplicate and sending the questioner to a working solution, which is really good.

A moderator could maybe still change the close reason to make it more clear why this question needs to be closed.

If you could change your closing reason it could indeed be seen as casting two votes (first vote for reason A, then question gets reopened, then you change your vote to reason B and thereby take part in closing it again). Not sure about the open/close wars as mentioned in the linked answer (I only see close wars currently) so it might be nice to have this feature (change close reason as long as question is not fully closed yet) but it also might be possible to just tell moderators about it so they can fix these cases.

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"If you could change your closing reason it would be indeed like casting two votes" - why would it? It's about changing the reason, not adding another one. –  BartoszKP Jul 6 at 22:23
    
"Questions rarely get reopened from my experience when they are improved after being on hold." This is inaccurate, those who spend time in the reopen queue know that questions remain closed because they remain flawed. The rate of successful reopen attempts is indeed low, but reopening does happen when justified. –  Brad Koch Jul 6 at 22:41
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@BartoszKP You vote for one reason, the question is edited, you vote a second time for another reason or you change your first reason - there is no difference between changing the reason of the first vote or voting a second time. At least you could see it this way. Changed the answer. –  Trilarion Jul 7 at 6:58
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@BradKoch I cannot yet spent my time in the reopen queue but my own experience where I tried to improve questions that were on hold but never ever got reopened seems to indicate that it is not true that questions remain closed because they remain flawed. So I beg to differ. –  Trilarion Jul 7 at 7:00
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@Trilarion I still don't get it. In what ways there is no difference? If there were 3 close votes, including yours, then the question is edited and you change your close vote reason there would be still 3 close votes. If you're referring to the comments that are automatically added with a CV, there are many obvious possible ways to handle this also. –  BartoszKP Jul 7 at 10:28
    
@BartoszKP I don't mean two votes in the sense that the weight is doubled but two votes in the sense that you can take part two times in a closing. As it is the question was closed for the wrong reason. It should be reopened and closed for the right reason. As Robert Harvey in the linked answer points out the second closure should be accomplished by different people. If you could change your vote reason you would take part in the second closure round (as I see it) and therefore violate the stated principle that everyone should only vote once per question. See updated answer for a compromise. –  Trilarion Jul 7 at 11:00
    
@BaroszKP As you can see I'm not really against changing the close vote reason. I wonder myself what these open/close wars might be. –  Trilarion Jul 7 at 11:08
    
@Trilarion Thanks for explaining, now I get it. –  BartoszKP Jul 7 at 11:09
    
Robert Harvey's got an answer in the related question as well: meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/262761/… –  nhgrif Jul 7 at 11:19
    
@nhgrif Thanks for linking. Although I don't agree with him. Will comment there. If the close reason doesn't really matter, we don't need to bother with it all all. –  Trilarion Jul 7 at 11:24

My guess would be that it's due to a limitation of the original idea and no one has deemed it important enough to code in the feature yet

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It takes more code to check if the user has already voted and show a message than it does to just allow them to overwrite their current vote. This was an intentional decision. –  woz Jul 5 at 15:25
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Maybe it takes more code overwrite the current vote than it does to just check and show a message? Who knows what processing is done on the votes that would have to be cancelled or have locking adding if the votes were made mutable? –  Nicholas Wilson Jul 5 at 15:50

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