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I'm getting more and more annoyed with the elitism shown on Stack Overflow.

This site is becoming a terrible place to ask questions, and each question that I ask seems to get downvotes, close requests, and what-more. I am seriously considering removing all my contributions to the site and moving on to a new community. When did this happen?

Some examples:

  • An age old question, receiving many upvotes and actual comments amazingly didn't fit the site anymore. Suddenly it got closed (and later deleted with auto moderation), and received downvotes?!
    The 4 stars should be an indication that this is not something that should be removed!
  • When I post a new topic that fits the format (silly questions only please) it gets an immediate downvote for being "stupid" to more experienced people?
  • Another question gets downvotes and close requests within seconds (!) of posting. This is utterly silly; why should I try to compile something that I explicitly said does not work. You only program after you prove something works, not before!
  • A question that asks how certain internals work also gets closed (and it seems no one here actually knows anything) - if it is about hardware it should be moved, not closed. As far as I can see, the question is valid and interesting to anyone interested in how computers work; a subject that touches programming. (As assembler follows directly from opcodes generated by decoders).
  • A question asking why a language does what it does also got closed. That felt really stupid. The answers were luckily completed already. But really, understanding why a language does things (instead of just noticing "hey it does ABC, just use that and don't think") is the very most important step to fully understanding things. It felt as if I was told to "just stay stupid and believe us it is best".

But maybe the worst example is how "definite book lists" are no longer allowed. This is simply exemplifying the attitude change around here. To quote Ben Franklin:

"Give a man bread and feed him for a day, teach a man how to fish and feed him for a lifetime".

This also counts for programming: "explain a problem and let a programming fix a bug, give him a book and let him fix all future bugs". As a Q&A site, the focus ought to be on education, helping newcomers with programming languages, helping them understand everything so they become masters themselves and can help future newcomers.

However right now it seems this site is getting more and more of a "showoff" feeling - who can answer the best question. And if you can't do that you fail. I'm actually getting ashamed by this, and how people seem to think it is normal to show this kind of elitism. Maybe my questions don't always have the best wording, but I'm not an Englishman, and I'm an Aerospace Engineer, not a language PhD.

So instead of closing, editing questions should be the first "trigger". And only when editing can't be done a question should be closed. As a last resort - help each other out and accept that not everyone has the same fluency.

I understand that with this volume some strict rules have to be made. But rules always have exceptions. Take the definite booklist questions - they are the single most valuable resource I've found on the internet. The actual recommendations are much better then just searching Amazon. When one searches Amazon one finds all kinds of reviews.

For these kind of important questions, exceptions should be made; they should be allowed and wiki'd the moment they rise!

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marked as duplicate by gnat, Martijn Pieters, Stijn, iCodez, murgatroid99 Jul 2 at 17:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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Just as a side note, your contributions aren't technically yours to remove any more, as you published them under a Creative Commons license. –  Pekka 웃 Jul 2 at 11:12
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As an observation, ranting about downvotes in an edit to your questions is only going to attract more downvotes and flags. Talking about this question specifically –  JonK Jul 2 at 11:14
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For more background on why list questions (which many of us love) are considered harmful, see meta.stackexchange.com/questions/158809 –  Pekka 웃 Jul 2 at 11:14
    
@Pekka웃 Ever heard of en.wikipedia.org/wiki/… - sure the data is public, but I can ask all my names to be gone from it should I wish to do so. –  paul23 Jul 2 at 11:14
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Yes, you can have your name removed from your contributions, that is no problem. –  Pekka 웃 Jul 2 at 11:15
    
@Pekka웃 Maybe they are bad - but those reasons there do not weigh up -by far- against the advantage of a good lists. Like I said: "exceptions" - do not allow everything but allow things that are positivelly received. (such as the booklists) - allow them for new langauges instead of keeping the information within the closed group. –  paul23 Jul 2 at 11:16
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Many tags curate book lists in their tag wikis, e.g. stackoverflow.com/tags/java/info and stackoverflow.com/tags/php/info –  Pekka 웃 Jul 2 at 11:17
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Regarding your first bullet, why do you assume it is going to get deleted? The post has sufficient upvotes and is answered, which should make it immune from auto-deletion. –  psubsee2003 Jul 2 at 11:17
    
@JonK That shows the immaturity even more, thanks for proving my point :). I am not particularly caring about rating - though closing I find really stupid. Especially for that question, should I jsut ask it again? And then say "how to make a list immutable"; which is the same thing but asked more directly so not leaving open options for complete different solutions. –  paul23 Jul 2 at 11:20
    
@psubsee2003 - the number of views on it also exclude it from being deleted. –  Oded Jul 2 at 11:21
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Okay, I'm just going to be blunt: your questions simply aren't that good. They sure aren't "important". And what did you expect this rant to result in? Upvotes? Also, you're making some assumptions about the close/downvote reasons. –  Cerbrus Jul 2 at 11:22
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I believe the recommended course of action for that question would be to re-edit it to remove the ranty section, and see if you can whip the rest of the question up into something a little more clear and concise. By posting on meta you've (probably unknowingly) invoked the meta effect - people are going to be scrutinising your questions/answers closely. That will very likely get you a flurry of up/downvotes depending on the perceived quality of your posts, but can be a useful thing to help identify areas that might need improvement. –  JonK Jul 2 at 11:26
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You find it crystal clear because you wrote it. You know exactly what you're asking, but that doesn't necessarily mean that you asked it in a way that clearly conveys that to everyone else. –  JonK Jul 2 at 11:28
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Often a code sample, even pseudocode, of what you're trying to do can help to make the question easier to understand. –  Cerbrus Jul 2 at 11:28
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Please also see meta.stackoverflow.com/a/253230/476. Maybe that puts a little perspective on it. –  deceze Jul 2 at 11:59

3 Answers 3

Shame you had to come out in what read as an outright rant, rather than something constructive. I hope the meta effect won't hit you too much (coming to meta and complaining brings your posts into the lime-light of meta regulars - not always to your benefit, in particular if attached to a rant).

Now to the points you have made:

When did this happen?

Over the past few years. Took a while to figure out that some types of posts are not good ones for the long term health of the site. In regards to book recommendations - others have posted relevant links in comments to your question, so I won't go into detail. (if anyone wants to edit those into here, by all means, go ahead).

An age old question; receiving many upvotes & actual comments "amazing" didn't fit the site anymore. Suddenly it gets closed (and deleted in the future with auto moderation), and receive downvotes on it?!

Keeping questions that are no longer appropriate open is sending a mixed signal to the community. It is a broken window - such posts end up as "why is this then still OK?" for others to question. Closing them sends the signal that they are no longer OK.

The 4 "stars" should be an indication that this is not something that should be removed!

Really? 4 people marked the question as favorite is an indication that is must stay? 4 is very little. And being popular doesn't make a post good or suitable.

When I post a new topic that fits the format (silly questions only please) it gets an immediate downvote for being "stupid" to more experienced people?

You are complaining about a single downvote (more than offset by 2 upvotes), and with 0 indication as to why. You are making assumptions and jumping to conclusions here. I find this one very difficult to take seriously.

Or other question gets downvotes & close requests within seconds(!) of posting. This is utterly silly as why should I try to compile something that is explicitly said to not work. You only program after you proof something works, not before!

You start with a rant that completely derails anything else. It is not constructive to your question and only serves to take focus off it. What did you expect would happen?

A question actually asking for how the internals work also gets closed (and it seems no one here actually knows anything) - if it is about hardware it should be moved, not closed. As AFAIK the question is valid and interesting to anyone interested in how computers work; a subject touching programming. (As assembler follows directly from opcodes generated by decoders).

No downvotes there. 2 close votes, one recent, probably due to this post (meta effect). It did not get closed since it was asked. So, not sure what you are talking about. You say it should be moved if off-topic - where to exactly? Frankly, it sounds more like a riddle than an actual programming problem you had been facing, which also goes against the guidelines.

A question actually requesting why a language does what it does also gets closed. This felt really stupid. The answers were luckily complete already. But really understand why a language does things (instead of just noticing "hey it does ABC, just use that and don't think") is the very most important step to fully understanding things. This really felt like I was told to "just stay stupid and believe us it is best".

Asking about why a language was designed the way it was is really something to ask the language designers, not the programming community as a whole. Again, a really old question from the times where Stack Overflow was still figuring itself out - and the community decided against such questions.


As a Q&A site the focus ought to be on education, helping newcomers to programming languages understand everything so they become masters themselves and can helping future newcomers.

Ah! So that's where the disconnect is.

Stack Overflow is not about teaching and helping new comers. It is about getting a corpus of great programming questions and answers. An resource of information. Not a tutorial or hand holding site.

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I disagree with the "great programming questions". Sounds too idealistic to me. If you look even only at the upvoted questions that survive most of them aren't great but just normal programming questions. I'm quite convinced there is a lot of hand holding going on everyday on SO. Please don't misunderstand me, I like SO the way it is now. –  Trilarion Jul 2 at 11:51
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@Trilarion - that's the ideal. But you know, real life gets in the way there ;) –  Oded Jul 2 at 11:54
    
In regards for the one downvote - well I don't really care too much as said - however it's the attitude that comes with it "just downvoting". Shouldn't that always require a reason/comment - so that someone who posted the question actually gets a feedback as to why it is bad and may refrain from asking it later? @riddle: no it was a direct question asked to me which I couldn't solve; so yes I see now I forgot the "homework" tag on it. But like I said there: I had no idea how to come to the answer and what steps to take. Questions where I'm really in the dark seem to go unanswerd. –  paul23 Jul 2 at 11:56
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@paul23 - no, it shouldn't. Because downvotes are the best signal we have for low quality/off-topic content. And putting obstacles in front of it would cause us to drown in crap. And if we have to live with the occasional random downvote - it is better than the alternative. Again - thinking about the long term health of the site. –  Oded Jul 2 at 11:59
    
As for question to ask language designers: well questions about C you also ask to people with experience in C, not to the whole community. Similar for "regex" etc etc. And honestly - I would expect anyone who says he's fluent in language XYZ to also understand the reasoning WHY something is in XYZ, otherwise I don't consider you good in that. –  paul23 Jul 2 at 11:59
    
@Oded Sure, only I would adapt the ideal on reality and not the other way around. Normal not so great questions are the butter and bread of SO's life. Great questions are the occasional but rather rare diamond. –  Trilarion Jul 2 at 12:02

I answered the question of yours that got "downvotes & close requests".

The reason why people voted to close your question was that your post definitely presented an XY problem; people asked for clarification about what your exact problem is, and when you did not edit the post, they voted for "Unclear what you're asking".

On the other hand, the up and down votes not only reflect about the subject matter of the question but also how the question is presented, and how well the OP has done preliminary research - your question did look like you were asking based on something that you read in a programming wiki; had you looked into the Python tutorial instead, you'd have not even considered writing a question.

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I concentrate on the "definite book lists".

Just an example of a sister Stackexchange:

What kinds of desktop environments and shells are available? on askubuntu is a question that surely is off-topic in several aspects. Nevertheless it's left open intentionally, has an exorbitant high view count (generating advertisement income as a side effect) and has only community wiki answers.

The idea behind: Neutral, solid information about different possible solutions of a broad topic while also getting some kind of popularity information by the voting order. Also avoiding a lot of similar questions.

You could do this for books for popular topics like C++, Java Concurrency, Python and Qt, ... whatever you want. Condition would be that all answers must be community wiki.

So what would be the downsides:

  • A definite list of something is difficult to impossible to create.
  • It would rather be Wikipedias realm.
  • It would be very different from the typical answers here
  • Who decides when a question is too broad but can stay because it is of high interest but must be community wiki? It's so arbitrary and subjective.

All in all "definite book lists" might be something for SO (because the inbuilt popularity measure is nice) but also pose a lot of problems and it should be discussed as separate feature-request.

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BTW askubuntu is a part of StackExchange not a sister. –  idmean Jul 2 at 12:13
    
Good to see someone picking my most important point out of the topic. This is exactly what I mean. The rest of my personal experience is just that - personal. This is however something I think should change. As said a wiki is possible, however the feedback (and knowing who gave the feedback) IS important to someone looking for a book. This is the important paragraph. –  paul23 Jul 2 at 12:19

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