I've been answering in Stack Overflow for quite a while. I focus on Matlab questions, so it could be that what I'm bringing up here is specific to those questions. But I have a feeling that it's something quite general.

I have observed that when I post a good answer and it is accepted just a few minutes later, the question tends to get fewer upvotes than when an equally good answer is left unaccepted for some hours or even days.

My interpretation is that questions without an accepted answer attract more attention from potential answerers, which leads to more votes. (It is this interpretation which makes me think this is something quite general, and not a trick of the light caused by the specific questions I focus on).

I find this moderately annoying. I can perfectly live with it, but I thought I'd bring it up here.

So, my questions:

  1. Have you also experienced this behaviour (early acceptance reducing the number of upvotes)?
  2. If so, do you think we should do something to try to diminish it? Or am I viewing it from a wrong perspective and we shouldn't worry about it?
  3. If you think something should be done about it: any ideas?

EDIT: After the comments, now I think the behaviour I observe applies mainly to specific questions. By "specific" I mean questions that are not likely to be seen by many people in the future. A question may be specific because of narrow focus of the matter beging asked; or because the tags or the programming language are not "popular"; or for some other reason.

Answers to general questions (as opposed to specific questions) tend to have many "long-term" votes, as the question is visited over and over, and so initial votes are not much of an issue. But a highly specific question does not have that luxury, and then the votes received during the "unaccepted period" are significant.

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Just want to point out that the work-in-progress recommended tab has a "needs answer" subtab that only shows questions without upvoted or accepted answers. I've been using it a lot lately to find questions to answer, so of course if other people do the same in the future, then as soon as an answer becomes accepted, it will drop out of that list. –  Cupcake Jul 1 at 23:14
    
@Cupcake But if that tab shows only questions without upvoted or accepted answers, the first upvote for an unaccepted answer would remove the question from that list, or am I mistaken? –  Frank Schmitt Jul 2 at 13:24
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1. Yes. 2. Don't care. Therefore 3. not relevant. The voting system makes SE tick but a few too many or too few seems insignificant. –  pnuts Jul 2 at 13:49
    
@FrankSchmitt no, you are not mistaken, it would be removed from the list. I think I see where you're going with that... –  Cupcake Jul 2 at 17:13
    
1. yes. 1b. I notice accepted answers get votes as more people use it as reference...an answer of mine from 2 years ago received an upvote today. question 3 : does it really matter? I'm active in the SQL tagged question, which rarely gets 20+ views per question in a day and even rarer to see more than a +4 answer. The number of upvotes you get has as much to do with the tags you're involved in (and therefore the number of people who see it) than anything else. –  Twelfth Jul 2 at 23:10
    
@Twelfth The number of upvotes you get has as much to do with the tags you're involved in (and therefore the number of people who see it) than anything else. Sure. That's why, for tags such as SQL or Matlab, the possible "loss" of votes due to early acceptance becomes important –  Luis Mendo Jul 2 at 23:24
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I think this is a specific case of a more general issue. The quality of an answer influences the percentage of people viewing the question who upvote the answer. The absolute number of votes is the product of the number of views and that percentage. Anything that affects the number of views, including question status as well as tag popularity, will affect the absolute number of votes. –  Patricia Shanahan Jul 20 at 4:10
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Have you tried to do any analysis on the Data Explorer site to quantify this effect? It should be feasible, though it isn't trivial. What's the measure you're after, I wonder? Average number of up votes for accepted answers that are more than (say) a week old, categorized by time between when question is asked and answer is accepted, grouped in buckets such as 0-15 minutes (is that zero?), 15-30 minutes; 30-45 minutes; 45-60 minutes; 1-2 hours; 2-4 hours; 4-6 hours; 6-12 hours; 12-24 hours; longer than 24 hours might be a starting point, for example. You could investigate by tags too. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 6 at 1:13
    
@JonathanLeffler Actually I've never used the Data Explorer, but I do find it interesting... Any tutorial on how to create queries? –  Luis Mendo Aug 6 at 1:20
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I've only used other people's queries, so no — I don't have much guidance to offer. Going to the home page (Data Explorer, there are a number of choices. You could look at some the existing queries, and I'm sure there's some proper help somewhere. You might need to look on Meta Stack Exchange for more information. There's probably something blindingly obvious I'm missing too. –  Jonathan Leffler Aug 6 at 1:52

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Have you also experienced this behaviour (early acceptance reducing the number of upvotes)?

At times, I have thought I had noticed this but, without any data to back it up, I'm not sure this is really happening. I'm sure that part of what you say is true, "My interpretation is that questions without an accepted answer attract more attention from potential answerers, which leads to more votes.". That's very possible. It could be partly due to people trying to tell the asker, "Hey, you should accept this because it is correct.". But I think it ultimately comes down to the quality of the answer, for the most part.

If so, do you think we should do something to try to diminish it? Or am I viewing it from a wrong perspective and we shouldn't worry about it?

No. Questions that are years old still get upvotes. In this situation, let happen what's going to happen.

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...people trying to tell the asker, "Hey, you should accept this because it is correct: I handn't though of that. Still, that means a "stubborn unaccepter" would tend to rise the number of upvotes. That's also strange (undesired?) behaviour. // BTW: yes, Android's framework is fantastic! :-) –  Luis Mendo Jul 1 at 23:15
    
It is maybe a little strange and/or undesired but if it is a good answer worth the upvotes then nothing is wrong. And I'm not sure there is much that could be done with it. Also, mostly fantastic ;) –  codeMagic Jul 1 at 23:20
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Just a thought about "Questions that are years old still get upvotes. In this situation, let happen what's going to happen": It's true that good answers will get upvotes in the log-term, even after years have passed; but it's also presumably true that they get more upvotes the longer the "unaccepted period" is. And for very specific-matter questions, the unaccepted-period votes may well exceed the long-term votes –  Luis Mendo Jul 1 at 23:47
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+1 The OP should accept this answer :) –  user000001 Jul 2 at 0:43

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