I think that validation questions (user information, currency, etc) are fair game but what about the ones that are more along the lines of "I need a regex the starts with 444, followed only by vowels, and ends with a smiley face". I'm seeing a lot of them lately and most of the time I can't see how something that specific can help anyone else, but they're rarely downvoted/closed. Another case is "what does this regex do?"; I understand how valuable this is for the OP in teaching them how regexes work, but again it does little for the community and is probably better suited for chat.

Is that a failure on my part (not flagging) or is there more value there than I realize? I can't find the specific questions right now but I'll keep trying if it's pertinent.

share

migrated from meta.stackexchange.com Jun 25 at 16:07

This question came from our discussion, support, and feature requests site for meta-discussion of the Stack Exchange family of Q&A websites.

1  
The more I think about it, the more it seems like my fault for not downvoting/flagging. –  Gary May 31 '13 at 19:09
add comment

1 Answer

Unfortunately I think the problem here is more than just specificity. Let's examine one particular question, and analyze it:

Javascript regex to extract the string before the last backslash

It reads:

I am dealing with timezone's in Javascript and I need a regex that will extract everything, but the timezone name from it. For example, I have the timezone America/Argentina/Buenos_Aires. I want to extract the America/Argentina part with a regex.

Currently I have this regex: tz.match(/.*?(?=\/|$)/i)[0] which extracts everything to the first backslash which works for most timezones (America/Los_Angeles), but not for all of them. How could I edit that regex so that it gets the string before the last value?

This almost certainly qualifies as Too Localized. Later users will arrive at the question expecting to find a regex that gets the string before the last backslash, and they might actually find it here. The second answer with no upvotes reads:

You may use this regex :

var output = input.match(/^(.*)\/[^/]*$/)[1];

But it's actually a very specific troubleshooting question.

The way to make the question less localized is to removed the "demonstration of effort" paragraph:

I am dealing with timezone's in Javascript and I need a regex that will extract everything, but the timezone name from it. For example, I have the timezone America/Argentina/Buenos_Aires. I want to extract the America/Argentina part with a regex. How do I do that?

Which makes it more broadly applicable to future users, but turns it into a canihazcodes question. Which way is preferable?

share
    
This problem is solved by requiring regex answers to explain why the regex works. –  Emrakul Jun 1 '13 at 13:48
    
@KnightswhosayNi: The only problem with that is that questions are evaluated on their own merit, not on the quality of answers they receive. –  Robert Harvey Jun 3 '13 at 15:35
    
I don't think the questions are inherently the problem to begin with, though. If everyone answering regex questions explained why the regex works, then the overall question quality wouldn't be an issue (beyond the regular checks for effort and research). –  Emrakul Jun 3 '13 at 15:42
    
But surely the voting system takes care of that. Whether a question is viable doesn't really have anything to do with the manner in which people answer, except that some questions attract poor answers. –  Robert Harvey Jun 3 '13 at 15:46
    
I'm not entirely sure about that... I'm having trouble putting my thoughts into words about this. I'm going to think about it some more. –  Emrakul Jun 3 '13 at 16:16
    
Well, this is a case of the XY problem, even if in this case it's not much of a problem because Y is the correct approach. The correct response is to edit the question title and opening paragraph to focus it on X (extracting time zone identifier from a time string), while relegating Y (the regex) to a "what I have tried" paragraph at the end. –  TRiG Jun 25 at 17:04
add comment

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .