I asked Is There A JavaScript Library That Offers OS-Dependent Browser Upgrade Options?

The question was down-voted. Among other things, I was told that "You cant ask people... if something exists."

Is this true? It sounds like a strange rule.

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This is just my opinion, take it at what you will. In the comments of your question you provided two examples that you found that you feel are similar to yours. The first question is similar but not necessarily the same. The user (again just my opinion) had a much more clear and concise idea of what they were looking for. The second example I personally would have downvoted. –  Leon Newswanger Jun 22 at 17:32
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Your question is too close to being a recommendation question. Read up on why those are hated; they serve as magnets for spammers, astroturfers, and other lowbrow folk. –  tmyklebu Jun 22 at 17:47
    
If you can reword your question with an actual problem you have just as I have done in a similar case shown here you could get many libraries suggested... –  rene Jun 22 at 18:24
    
@rene that could be very hard to pull off. The original poster also has the option of asking a good question on Software Recommendations. –  Cupcake Jun 22 at 19:28
    
@Cupcake I disagree. If you describe the actual problem you and show your attempt to fix it for 3 OS-es/browser I'm pretty sure you get libraries suggested without it being off-topic on SO. If you have an extensive and clear list of requirements (and that is all you have), software recs might become an option. –  rene Jun 22 at 19:30
    
The question does not ask for a recommendation. I think it's important to make a distinction between asking for a recommendation, asking for help finding something and clarifying whether something exists. All are very different categories of questions, which will invite different kinds of replies. –  user3246023 Jun 22 at 23:04

2 Answers 2

Is It [Off-Topic] to Ask About the Existence of [a Library]?

Yes. Asking the question "Is there a library that does X" is an open-ended question. People create software libraries all the time, and this type of question would invite users to keep posting answers for every library in existence and every library that is created in the future forever.

Such questions invite the same kind of answers as explicit recommendation questions.

Why Your Question Was Closed

The close reason on your question says the following:

"Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it."

Why Recommendation Questions Aren't Allowed

According to Pekka's answer to Why are "shopping list" questions bad? (bold emphasis mine):

The main arguments against "shopping list questions" are:

  • They are open-ended; there is never one perfect answer to them.

  • They outdate incredibly quickly. This was what turned me against shopping list questions: if you look around on Stack Overflow, you will find plenty of 2010 "what's the best xyz" questions whose answers are hideously outdated now.

  • They tend to attract a lot of spam and/or link only answers

Your Question

Your question (bold emphasis mine)

Is There A JavaScript Library That Offers OS-Dependent Browser Upgrade Options?

I am looking for a JavaScript library that helps users update their browser. I would ideally like something that looks at the user's operating system and suggests a compatible browser. For example, if the user is running Windows XP, you can't get them to update to a modern version of IE.

is clearly asking for a recommendation for a library, and is thus off-topic, according to Stack Overflow's guidelines.

Bad Examples

In the comments to your question, you gave examples of other questions and asked "why those are different?":

The answer is, they're not. They're bad examples, and I've just voted to close them for the same reason.

See Also

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That second bad example is now closed.. –  rene Jun 22 at 19:31
    
This question asked about the existence of a library, which may be against the rules. But I don't think the question asks for a software recommendation. Please consider revising your question so as not to conflate asking about the existence of something, asking for help finding something and asking for a recommendation. –  user3246023 Jun 22 at 23:01
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@user3246023 you're asking people to inform you if there are libraries that do X. There are two possible answers, "yes", and answers of the form "Library Z does X". You're implicitly asking for recommendations, and thus your question is off-topic. Questions asking about "existence of a library", "help me find a library", and "recommend me a library" are all really just recommendation questions, and all will invite the same kind of answers. –  Cupcake Jun 22 at 23:19
    
You could, for example, ask if there is such as thing as a road vehicle with four wheels and an electrical engine. This is not the same thing as asking for the best electrical car. –  user3246023 Jun 22 at 23:33
    
@user3246023 "Questions asking us to...find a...library...are off-topic." Your question would still be off-topic even under that part of the clause. You might have a viable question on Software Recommendations if you stay within their (also strict) guidelines. –  Cupcake Jun 22 at 23:38
    
@Cupcake You'll see that I previously said "This question asked about the existence of a library, which may be against the rules." I believe that your answer ignores the differences between asking if something exists and asking for a recommendation. Perhaps both should be against the rules, but I think it's unwise to assume both are one and the same. I think it would be good if the question was more focused on answering the question that was asked. –  user3246023 Jun 22 at 23:42
    
@user3246023 "I am asking about the existence of a tool, not for opinions about what is best. Asking about the existence of something demands a concrete, fact-based answer." that's also too open-ended, it could attract many answers indefinitely (as new libraries are created), and thus could be closed as Too Broad as well. –  Cupcake Jun 22 at 23:43
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@user3246023 "You could, for example, ask if there is such as thing as a road vehicle with four wheels and an electrical engine." In response, I could recommend to you every hybrid and electric car in existence, and continue to recommend new ones as new models are created. Do you see how your question would attract spammy recommendations, even if you did not explicitly ask for them? –  Cupcake Jun 22 at 23:54
    
@Cupcake answers change over time. New methods come into existence and programming languages evolve. Surely it would better if new facts led to better answers. If you were to list every hybrid and electric car in existence that would be an excellent addition to the conversation. I can understand why you're against me asking something like, "what is the best functional programming language? But it's a shame that, when something smells vaguely similar, your response is to clamp down on it. The question could have led to spammy answers, but also great answers. No opinions were requested. –  user3246023 Jun 23 at 1:41
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see also: Question closed because yes/no answer –  gnat Jun 23 at 9:13
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@user Q: "Does such a library exist?" A: "No, there's no such thing." - How can this answer be authoritative? Does the answerer really know every single library that is out there on the web? If someone stumbles across this question half a year from now, is this answer still accurate? If someone created such a library in the meantime, who will keep this answer accurate and up-to-date? OTOH, if the answer is: "Yes, such a library exists." - ...aaaaand then? You'll also want to have the name of that library, no? And we're right back at a recommendation answer, which is bad. QED above. –  deceze Jun 23 at 9:32

"Questions asking us to recommend or find a tool, library or favorite off-site resource are off-topic for Stack Overflow as they tend to attract opinionated answers and spam. Instead, describe the problem and what has been done so far to solve it."

You should describe the problem and ask for ideas on it... I know that it looks the same, but it is not.

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