I've actually got into this situation twice. After a moderator undelete some of my old questions, I'm able to post new ones immediately. That is, without modifying and republishing of my old questions.

This implies there's some impact directly from the deletion move itself, instead of receptions of a question/answer. Isn't the account privilege supposed to be solely come from the quality/reception of one's posts (questions/answers)?

When I delete my questions/answers that means I've realized it's wasting time of the community and want to stop it, and this action actually further impact my account negatively, does this actually make sense to many of you?

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Deletion can also mean: I don't want the community to downvote my posts any more than they already have been downvoted. If you routinely delete posts, then that is a signal you are routinely asking low-quality posts. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 13 at 19:19
    
If you are asking bad questions, routinely, but deleting those posts to avoid the post being downvoted and / or closed, then you are avoiding the quality measures put in place. So, deletion is one metric used for the automatic question ban. –  Martijn Pieters Jun 13 at 19:20
    
I can agree with you on that part, but this not necessarily impacting the community negatively, deleted posts won't be seen by others and wont waste their time any further, I don't see much point to discourage this move. If one delete all negatively received posts and left positive ones for public, that means he/she's impacting the community positively right? –  miushock Jun 13 at 19:22
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that means I've realized it's wasting time of the community we kind of want people to figure that out before wasting the time of the community :/ –  Will Jun 13 at 19:25
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@Will From my experience this was like "punishing further for the attempt of making up a mistake", which does not make a lot of sense. In other words, the signal of "want people to figure that out" was unclear, and the instruction of correct action to take was unclear by the time it was needed –  miushock Jun 13 at 19:29

2 Answers 2

The post ban does use deleted questions as one of it's considerations when determining whether or not a give user is allowed to post questions/answers, so the actual act of deleting/undeleting a post can potentially push you to the other side of the threshold.

If you are showing that a considerable percentage of your contributions are so unhelpful that they need to be deleted, and you don't learn from those mistakes and begin to provide valuable contributions, then its shown that the site is better off not accepting additional questions.

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The point is, if one keep producing unhelpful posts, then the reception of posts will get them banned. The deletion of these posts shall not matter right? –  miushock Jun 13 at 19:32
    
@miushock If you keep posting unhelpful posts you're likely to wind up question banned whether your delete them or not, yes. –  Servy Jun 13 at 19:36
    
That's the point I want to make. Say I have a question with '-5', then I delete it, is this a good/bad/neutral move from the point of the community? Current system see this as 'attempt to escape further down vote' thus giving it a penalty. My point is this deletion is at least neutral, if not good to the community. Because based on the reception of people who have seen the post, deletion prevented more people wasting time on it. –  miushock Jun 13 at 19:40
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The reason that deletion is considered for question bans is because asking a question, getting an answer, and then deleting the question, is abusive behavior. It means that someone took the time to write an answer, and that work is now gone. –  Robert Harvey Jun 13 at 19:42
    
@miushock Having deleted content also means that the content is unsalvagable. What you really should be doing is fixing the problems, not trying to hide them. And once again, this is only an issue if you're repeatedly failing to post good content. If you are only occasionally making mistakes it is irrelevant. –  Servy Jun 13 at 19:43
    
explanation from @RobertHarvey made a lot of sense to me. I still think SO shall emphasize more on how much deletions are HATED in this community to new users tho. Because there's usually a difference on how seriously people take it from other community. Also, given that deleting make so little sense in SO currently, removing this function completely might not be out of the question. –  miushock Jun 13 at 19:46
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@miushock: Deletion is essential to maintaining a degree of quality in the material posted here. It's not about deletion; it's about using deletion in an abusive way. Another example: student posts their homework, gets an answer, and then deletes the post because they don't want their professor to know. –  Robert Harvey Jun 13 at 19:53

When I delete my questions/answers that means I've realized it's wasting time of the community and want to stop it, and this action actually further impact my account negatively, does this actually make sense to many of you?

Actually, yes it does. You have understand that anytime a user posts a question they consume resources. This includes both the physical resources of Stack Exchange, but most importantly the resources (mostly time) of any user who encounters the question.

The ban is directed at people who continually post low quality content. A single bad question will never get anyone banned. But users that posts a lot of poor or marginal content (regardless of whether or not they are deleted) obviously don't want to or don't care to understand exactly what is considered acceptable for Stack Overflow. The question ban is the system's way of protecting itself from such users.

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I don't thing your answer made any sense in anyway to my question at all. I'm here talking about how 'delete' action' should impact one's posting privilege, and you're telling me user posing low quality posts repeated will get banned. I just cant relate it. –  miushock Jun 13 at 23:55

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