As a user, I see voting up/down answers that were helpful being a much lower barrier to engage with the community. I found myself wanting to vote up answers many times, but got frustrated instead because I did not have enough points.

From this point I have 2 options: a). ask a question, regardless of its importance or relevance to the topic/community (eg this one) b). start contributing with answers.

Will concentrate on b). There are 3 possible options (ignoring the Dreyfus model here)

  1. I am a newbie
  2. I am a decent programmer
  3. I am an expert

In situations 2-3, will most likely be able to produce at least a decent answer that might be voted up/accepted.

What happens, however, in situation 1? I will (most likely) give an average answer that will not win reputation. This will make me engage with the site less and just read other people's answers rather than contribute.

Having the possibility to vote answers up/down before asking a question/submitting an answer, would help me contribute through the power of experimentation (ie tried the solution from an answer, worked for me).

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migrated from stackoverflow.com Jun 12 at 22:11

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You can also gain reputation by suggesting edits to questions and answers (assuming they get approved), which doesn't require any programming expertise. –  dano Jun 13 at 2:31

1 Answer 1

Requiring a minimal reputation before allowing voting greatly reduces the use of sock-puppet accounts.

For an example of using a sock puppet: UserA joins, posts a few questions, creates a bunch of new accounts (UserB, UserC, UserD), and uses each of those new accounts to up-vote the original questions asked by UserA, rapidly increasing the reputation on the account of UserA. (And yes, it was a serious problem at one point here.)

It also means that you have at least a minimal level of experience at SO, so that you understand a little more about how the site works and what types of answers should be voted on (either up or down).

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Worth noting: while it doesn't completely prevent sockpuppets, it makes it a great deal more difficult for them to be created (since they have to either post good content, or upvote each other), and easier to catch. –  nneonneo Jun 12 at 23:52
    
@nneonneo: Point taken. I rephrased the first paragraph. Thanks. –  Ken White Jun 13 at 0:01

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