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Improve posts by editing or commenting

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Use edits to fix mistakes, improve formatting, or clarify the meaning of a post.

The edit page says:

When should I edit posts?

Any time you see a post that needs improvement and are inclined to suggest an edit, you are welcome to do so. The original author of a question or answer may always edit their own post, regardless of reputation level.

Edits are expected to be substantial and to leave the post better than you found it. Common reasons for edits include:

  • To fix grammar and spelling mistakes
  • To clarify the meaning of the post (without changing that meaning)
  • To include additional information only found in comments, so all of the information relevant to the post is contained in one place
  • To correct minor mistakes or add updates as the post ages
  • To add related resources or hyperlinks

When should I edit code in questions and answers?

Resources:

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migrated from meta.stackexchange.com Jun 11 '14 at 19:32

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up vote 85 down vote accepted

Reviewing Code Edits

When in doubt, click 'Skip'. "Learn to love that Skip button."

Editing Code in Questions

Code in questions should only be edited for formatting and readability. Editing the syntax or correcting typos in code in questions can fix the problem that the person asking the question has, causing answers to be unable to address the problem.

Do:

  • Add code blocks around code
  • Add indentation
  • Add line breaks
  • Improve the title to match the question content
  • Edit tags to match the question
  • Fix any spelling/grammar errors outside of the code block

Don't:

  • Fix Syntax (non-closed brackets, missing semi-colons, etc.), unless they are obviously not relevant to the question
  • Fix typos (misspelled function calls, variable names, etc.), unless they are obviously not relevant to the question
  • Change code conventions (delimited_names to camelCase names, etc.)
  • Change the code logic or functionality
  • Ignore improvements that can be made outside the code block (spelling, grammar, etc.)

Example

Original Question:

[PROBLEM] My SQL is foobar (returns nothing)

SELECT TgName, COUNT(*) AS UpVotes FROM Tags INNER JOIN PostTags ON PostTags.TagId = Tags.id INNER JOIN Posts ON Posts.ParentId = PostTags.PostId INNER JOIN Votes ON Votes.PostId = Posts.Id and VoteTypeId = 2 WHERE Posts.OwnerUserId = @UserId GROUP BY TagName ORDER BY UpVotes DESC

Good Edit:

Query Returning No Values

I want my query to return foo, but it is returning nothing instead.

Here is my code:

SELECT
    TgName,
    COUNT(*) AS UpVotes 
FROM Tags
    INNER JOIN PostTags ON PostTags.TagId = Tags.id
    INNER JOIN Posts ON Posts.ParentId = PostTags.PostId
    INNER JOIN Votes ON Votes.PostId = Posts.Id and VoteTypeId = 2
WHERE 
    Posts.OwnerUserId = @UserId
GROUP BY TagName 
ORDER BY UpVotes DESC

Title was made more descriptive, the code was formatted properly, and an explanation of the question was added to the body rather than just having a code dump.

Bad Edit:

[PROBLEM] My SQL is foobar (returns nothing)

SELECT
    TagName,
    COUNT(*) AS UpVotes 
FROM Tags
    INNER JOIN PostTags ON PostTags.TagId = Tags.id
    INNER JOIN Posts ON Posts.ParentId = PostTags.PostId
    INNER JOIN Votes ON Votes.PostId = Posts.Id and VoteTypeId = 2
WHERE 
    Posts.OwnerUserId = @UserId
GROUP BY TagName 
ORDER BY UpVotes DESC

The problem was because TagName in the original was misspelled as TgName, since that was fixed, the query will work and the problem becomes hidden due to the edit. Despite improving the code, the title is still undescriptive and hasn't been fixed.

Editing Code in Answers

Answers are intended to be resources for future visitors. While quick and dirty answers are useful, they may have errors in syntax due to being typed in without being checked first, and could have room for improvement. Unlike questions, making an answer work is a good thing and should be encouraged with a few guidelines to follow.

Do:

  • Test your edited code to make sure it works
  • Fix syntax errors and typos*1
  • Improve formatting
  • Correct spelling/grammar issues in the answer body

Don't:

  • Change code conventions (delimited_names to camelCase names, etc.)
  • Make the code do something different than what the answer says it does
  • Ignore improvements that can be made outside the code block (spelling, grammar, etc.)

*1 If changing the syntax errors or typos would result in the code doing something other than what the answer says it will, consider creating a comment or a separate answer explaining your change. If posting another answer with only that change seems like it won't provide added value to future visitors, it probably doesn't change logic or functionality and should be an edit instead.

Example:

Original Answer:

I think able enough in this code, please check.

$('body').keypress(function(e) 
{
  if (e.keyCode == '13')
  {
     e.stopPropragation();

    }
});​

Good Edit:

This code should work though may need adjustment.

$('body').keypress(function(e)
{
  if (e.keyCode == '13')
  {
    e.stopPropagation();
  }
});​

The code was using stopPropragation() instead of stopPropagation() so that was fixed, the body was edited to be clear to an English speaker, and the indentation was made consistent to improve the code's formatting.

Bad Edit:

I think able enough in this code, please check.

$('body').keypress(function (e) {
    if (e.keyCode === 13) {
        e.stopPropragation();
    }
});​

A few coding and style issues that didn't prevent the code from working were changed, while the show-stopper with stopPropragation() and the nonsensical English was left as-is.

Suggested Edits for Code

If you do not have 2,000 reputation allowing you to edit without review, you should be sure to include a good Edit Summary. Reviewers may not be an expert in the language you are submitting an edit for, and may click 'Reject' if they aren't sure if your edit meets these guidelines. Adding a good Edit Summary will help minimize the chance of them making the wrong decision.

Example:

Good Edit Summary

Clearly explaining the changes made and the reason

By explaining what the content of the change was, you are able to direct the reviewer to what they need to look at.

Bad Edit Summary

Reviewer has to guess at the intent

If you just say something short like 'edited code' then it is far more likely that the reviewer will have to guess at the reason and intent, and reject the edit if they can't be sure it was appropriate.

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Keep in mind that changing the indentation in the following languages may also change the functionality of the code and mask the issue just as much as fixing a typo: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Off-side_rule – RyanfaeScotland Feb 22 at 17:02
    
When I fix a broken code block, does "Fixed broken code block" suffice? It does sound a lot like "Fixed Code", but I don't think writing "Added indentation so broken code blocks display properly" (or something similar) is that necessary. – LarsW Apr 6 at 19:17

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