The about page says:

Improve posts by editing or commenting

Our goal is to have the best answers to every question, so if you see questions or answers that can be improved, you can edit them.

Use edits to fix mistakes, improve formatting, or clarify the meaning of a post.

The edit page says:

When should I edit posts?

Any time you see a post that needs improvement and are inclined to suggest an edit, you are welcome to do so. The original author of a question or answer may always edit their own post, regardless of reputation level.

Edits are expected to be substantial and to leave the post better than you found it. Common reasons for edits include:

  • To fix grammar and spelling mistakes
  • To clarify the meaning of the post (without changing that meaning)
  • To include additional information only found in comments, so all of the information relevant to the post is contained in one place
  • To correct minor mistakes or add updates as the post ages
  • To add related resources or hyperlinks

When should I edit code in questions and answers?

Resources:

Return to FAQ index

share

migrated from meta.stackexchange.com Jun 11 at 19:32

This question came from our discussion, support, and feature requests site for meta-discussion of the Stack Exchange family of Q&A websites.

    
For editing a post see this earlier question. For editing code in a post I struggle to think of a legitimate reason to do so. Add code blocks is about it - that's about it. Any other change to code content (including all whitespace) has the potential to change the meaning of the code and hence the question or answer, which is what comments and voting is for. –  Keith Nov 1 '13 at 8:24
    
@Keith I'm not sure who to ask but you mention "(including all whitespace)". Removing completely blank lines seems to meet the "improve formatting" criterion, but does it escape the "all whitespace" consideration? Example (admittedly not the best!) here. –  pnuts Oct 15 at 15:58
    
@pnuts I don't think you should ever edit someone else's code blocks to 'improve formatting'. Not only is that subjective (and SO has no house style as such) but you could also change the context of the question in several languages. For example, Javascript has a line terminator ;, but can also end on a new line. This means that adding a line break before a { (one of those code formatting issues developers are weirdly fanatical about) can actually completely change the outcome of the code or even fix/break the issue being discussed. –  Keith Oct 16 at 19:42
    
@Keith Many thanks for the clarification. I was specifically interested in "Removing completely blank lines" (so that, eg, what would fit in one screen is not spread over two or three) but am happy to "leave well alone"! –  pnuts Oct 16 at 19:46
    
@pnuts are you completely sure that blank lines don't matter in all the languages that might get edited on here? In any case, many users have coding standards (I know mine does) that requires blank lines in some places and forbids them in others. Are yours the same? Does changing the code to match your standards on blank lines make it more readable? –  Keith Oct 16 at 19:52
    
@Keith "all languages" definitely not (but my context, though I did not say so, is actually VBA only). "The same" no, because I lack any (and not just for coding, some would say!) "readable" I think yes, because of the scrolling aspect (where that applies). –  pnuts Oct 16 at 19:58

1 Answer 1

up vote 52 down vote accepted

Reviewing Code Edits

When in doubt, click 'Skip'. "Learn to love that Skip button."

Editing Code in Questions

Code in questions should only be edited for formatting and readability. Editing the syntax or correcting typos in code in questions can fix the problem that the person asking the question has, causing answers to be unable to address the problem.

Do:

  • Add code blocks around code
  • Add indentation
  • Add line breaks
  • Improve the title to match the question content
  • Edit tags to match the question
  • Fix any spelling/grammar errors outside of the code block

Don't:

  • Fix Syntax (non-closed brackets, missing semi-colons, etc.)
  • Fix typos (misspelled function calls, variable names, etc.)
  • Change code conventions (delimited_names to camelCase names, etc.)
  • Change the code logic or functionality
  • Ignore improvements that can be made outside the code block (spelling, grammar, etc.)

Example

Original Question:

[PROBLEM] My SQL is foobar (returns nothing)

SELECT TgName, COUNT(*) AS UpVotes FROM Tags INNER JOIN PostTags ON PostTags.TagId = Tags.id INNER JOIN Posts ON Posts.ParentId = PostTags.PostId INNER JOIN Votes ON Votes.PostId = Posts.Id and VoteTypeId = 2 WHERE Posts.OwnerUserId = @UserId GROUP BY TagName ORDER BY UpVotes DESC

Good Edit:

Query Returning No Values

I want my query to return foo, but it is returning nothing instead.

Here is my code:

SELECT
    TgName,
    COUNT(*) AS UpVotes 
FROM Tags
    INNER JOIN PostTags ON PostTags.TagId = Tags.id
    INNER JOIN Posts ON Posts.ParentId = PostTags.PostId
    INNER JOIN Votes ON Votes.PostId = Posts.Id and VoteTypeId = 2
WHERE 
    Posts.OwnerUserId = @UserId
GROUP BY TagName 
ORDER BY UpVotes DESC

Title was made more descriptive, the code was formatted properly, and an explanation of the question was added to the body rather than just having a code dump.

Bad Edit:

[PROBLEM] My SQL is foobar (returns nothing)

SELECT
    TagName,
    COUNT(*) AS UpVotes 
FROM Tags
    INNER JOIN PostTags ON PostTags.TagId = Tags.id
    INNER JOIN Posts ON Posts.ParentId = PostTags.PostId
    INNER JOIN Votes ON Votes.PostId = Posts.Id and VoteTypeId = 2
WHERE 
    Posts.OwnerUserId = @UserId
GROUP BY TagName 
ORDER BY UpVotes DESC

The problem was because TagName in the original was misspelled as TgName, since that was fixed, the query will work and the problem becomes hidden due to the edit. Despite improving the code, the title is still undescriptive and hasn't been fixed.

Editing Code in Answers

Answers are intended to be resources for future visitors. While quick and dirty answers are useful, they may have errors in syntax due to being typed in without being checked first, and could have room for improvement. Unlike questions, making an answer work is a good thing and should be encouraged with a few guidelines to follow.

Do:

  • Test your edited code to make sure it works
  • Fix syntax errors and typos*1
  • Improve formatting
  • Correct spelling/grammar issues in the answer body

Don't:

  • Change code conventions (delimited_names to camelCase names, etc.)
  • Make the code do something different than what the answer says it does
  • Ignore improvements that can be made outside the code block (spelling, grammar, etc.)

*1 If changing the syntax errors or typos would result in the code doing something other than what the answer says it will, consider creating a comment or a separate answer explaining your change. If posting another answer with only that change seems like it won't provide added value to future visitors, it probably doesn't change logic or functionality and should be an edit instead.

Example:

Original Answer:

I think able enough in this code, please check.

$('body').keypress(function(e) 
{
  if (e.keyCode == '13')
  {
     e.stopPropragation();

    }
});​

Good Edit:

This code should work though may need adjustment.

$('body').keypress(function(e)
{
  if (e.keyCode == '13')
  {
    e.stopPropagation();
  }
});​

The code was using stopPropragation() instead of stopPropagation() so that was fixed, the body was edited to be clear to an English speaker, and the indentation was made consistent to improve the code's formatting.

Bad Edit:

I think able enough in this code, please check.

$('body').keypress(function (e) {
    if (e.keyCode === 13) {
        e.stopPropragation();
    }
});​

A few coding and style issues that didn't prevent the code from working were changed, while the show-stopper with stopPropragation() and the nonsensical English was left as-is.

Suggested Edits for Code

If you do not have 2,000 reputation allowing you to edit without review, you should be sure to include a good Edit Summary. Reviewers may not be an expert in the language you are submitting an edit for, and may click 'Reject' if they aren't sure if your edit meets these guidelines. Adding a good Edit Summary will help minimize the chance of them making the wrong decision.

Example:

Good Edit Summary

Clearly explaining the changes made and the reason

By explaining what the content of the change was, you are able to direct the reviewer to what they need to look at.

Bad Edit Summary

Reviewer has to guess at the intent

If you just say something short like 'edited code' then it is far more likely that the reviewer will have to guess at the reason and intent, and reject the edit if they can't be sure it was appropriate.

share
1  
I'm not a fan of <pre>. Never had to use it before; don't see why it would be encouraged. –  Makoto Oct 11 '13 at 2:31
    
@Makoto, I edited the language (though the editing help says the same thing essentially). –  jmac Oct 11 '13 at 2:49
1  
Essentially it accomplishes the same thing, but this reads a bit clearer. Definitely liking this. I would recommend moving the portion about skipping in doubt to the top, but outside of that, this is spot on. –  Makoto Oct 11 '13 at 2:51
4  
Also, the SQL foobar might be a bad example. If that SQL query really is all on one line, correcting its indentation also hides an error: everything in the SQL statement is commented out after the SELECT keyword! Might want to make it more explicit what's going on there for readers (it was nicely formatted in the post but they didn't get it a code block so its newlines are ignored?) or pick an example without a comment. –  doppelgreener Oct 11 '13 at 2:58
6  
Editing code in answers: Might want to change "Don't Change the code logic or functionality" to "Don't Change the code logic or functionality - even if you think you're correcting a logic error." General convention there is: if the answer is wrong, let it be wrong, downvote it, and post your own answer if you want. Correcting syntax mistakes might also be a Don't for this reason. –  doppelgreener Oct 11 '13 at 3:01
    
The answer example's "bad edit" being bad for changing the indentation seems to contradict "Do Improve formatting". The original code appears to have inconsistent & weird indentation, so isn't changing the indentation an improvement of formatting? It'd be different if it was a style change, but that doesn't appear to be what's going on here, and the shift of the first open brace to the same line is a formatting (and consistency) improvement rather than an apparent change of style. –  doppelgreener Oct 11 '13 at 3:05
1  
I've made the above changes (but I haven't made correcting syntax mistakes a don't). –  doppelgreener Oct 11 '13 at 3:28
2  
@Jon, the way I think about syntax errors is, "would a separate answer serve better?" in the case of a missing bracket (or mucked up brackets), or whatnot, I would certainly rather have an edit to the question than a separate answer with the same logic but just slightly different syntax as someone using SO as a resource. Logic issues are out in my mind because you are changing how the code solves the problem, not just fixing errors preventing the code from working. Perhaps something to that extent could be added in. –  jmac Oct 11 '13 at 4:03
3  
@jmac You made a very good Q&A and dealt with the issues at hand very well for a non-developer. It seems to me, on further examination, that the issue of at what point you should go make your own answer instead of correcting code is something the community might be a bit divided on - or I'm just not reading the right question. –  doppelgreener Oct 11 '13 at 4:11
1  
@ben please do! I would love it if someone who actually knows how to code were to make better, shorter, more appropriate examples in any language that a developer is likely to recognize. –  jmac Oct 11 '13 at 7:31
1  
Came accros this suggestion Includes: delimited_names to camelCase, maybe a fix, but I don't like just to change it for "clarity". –  Johannes Kuhn Oct 11 '13 at 7:43
1  
I disagree, apart from adding code blocks and adding proper comments on edits. If the question/answer is not correct code downvote or comment on it. Anything to do with whitespace/layout can change the meaning of the code or is extremely subjective. –  Keith Nov 1 '13 at 8:31
6  
@Keith, if an answer says, "Eye think you're problem are that their is a typo they're" and you change it to "I think your problem is that there is a typo there" you are changing the meaning. You are doing so to correct an unintended mistake of the author. If code doesn't work because it is missing a semi-color, or a bracket, adding the bracket after ensuring that it makes sense (does what the question is asking for and the answer is implying it does), why is this incorrect? Where is the difference? What is any more subjective than editing spelling/grammar? –  jmac Nov 1 '13 at 8:48
1  
@Keith, note that my comment, and the answer to this question, both clearly differentiate between editing code in questions and answers. The above comment clearly states in an answer, and the answer above says that you shouldn't edit syntax in questions. I don't think we are in disagreement here, I think you should take another look at what's being said. –  jmac Nov 1 '13 at 12:53
2  
@user66001 no code edits ;) –  Emrakul Mar 3 at 4:22

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .