So, I've visited one of my answers here and noticed something strange in the revision history:

It's something like this.

  • Initial edit by me
  • Spot on technical clarification by Quentin.
  • Additional edit by me.
  • Grammar improvement by Dgrin91
  • Additional info by me.
  • Edit suggested by Aswin Anand who has 47 rep. Edit was approved by community, presumably as it was "improved" in the review queue.
  • Edit by Barranka (4.8K rep) fixing the link left by Aswin, putting it in correct markdown format.

Now, I don't mind the last two edits, Aswin was acting in good faith and added a link to a resource I personally trust. However, since the answer is not community wiki, I'm not sure if the edit was appropriate. As silly as it sounds, I've never dealt with this before and I'm not sure what the community stance on this is.

Is it appropriate to edit references into answers?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 27 down vote accepted

In this specific case, I would have rejected the edit since the link is an aside and it isn't clear which part of a very long document is relevant to the answer. In general, adding links to posts with an edit should be evaluated by simply asking:

Does it make the post better?

For instance, in your post you say:

Which explains what you're getting, you're overriding the function. More generally, multiple var declarations are allowed in JavaScript - var x = 3; var x = 5 is perfectly legal. In the new ECMAScript 6 standard, let statements forbid this as well as normal var statements in ES5 strict mode.

This could be improved as follows:

Which explains what you're getting, you're overriding the function. More generally, multiple var declarations are allowed in JavaScript - var x = 3; var x = 5 is perfectly legal. In the new ECMAScript 6 standard, let statements forbid this as well as normal var statements in ES5 strict mode.

Adding a link to the specifications you are discussing allows people to look in to it if they want. It does not change your intent, the info is directly related to what you're talking about, and it saves me from doing a google search.

It could be further improved as:

Which explains what you're getting, you're overriding the function. More generally, multiple var declarations are allowed in JavaScript - var x = 3; var x = 5 is perfectly legal. In the new ECMAScript 6 standard, let statements forbid this as well as normal var statements in ES5 strict mode.

The identifiers implements, interface, let, package, private, protected, public, static, and yield are classified as FutureReservedWord tokens within strict mode code. (11.6.2.2).

(assuming that's actually the relevant bit from the specifications that explains why, I personally don't know, so I won't suggest the edit). This not only adds a link to the information, but provides the context rather than just hiding it behind a link to a giant document.

Remember what the edit help says:

When should I edit posts?

Edits are expected to be substantial and to leave the post better than you found it. Common reasons for edits include:

  • To fix grammar and spelling mistakes
  • To clarify the meaning of the post (without changing that meaning)
  • To include additional information only found in comments, so all of the information relevant to the post is contained in one place
  • To correct minor mistakes or add updates as the post ages
  • To add related resources or hyperlinks

Adding resources is specifically listed as a reason to edit posts, so long as it is substantial and makes the post better.

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I'm not convinced by the multi-line hyperlink, but otherwise, I agree that adding a hyperlink to a reliable source is a reasonable edit. Reliability is in the eye of the beholder, unfortunately; if it is your question or answer, you get to decide whether the edit stays or not (at least until the next activist comes along to change your mind for you). If it's someone else's material, you can decide you don't like the resource and substitute another, but you'd better have a good reason for doing so (even if you don't state it). –  Jonathan Leffler Jun 10 at 6:16
    
@Jonathan, the beauty of edits is that if you think my formatting can be improved, all you have to do is click edit and make it look better! I promise I won't mind (so long as you improve it!) –  jmac Jun 10 at 6:46

Absolutely not. Extra resources can be in a comment, but never as an edit to someone else's answer. As you said yourself:

Now, I don't mind the last two edits, Aswin was acting in good faith and added a link to a resource I personally trust.

What if that weren't true? What if you didn't trust the resource? Allowing such edits is putting words into your mouth that you wouldn't necessarily agree with. The correct thing would've been to leave a comment and let you decide for yourself whether to edit it in, rather than making you have to go out of your way and rollback if you actively dislike the resource he chose.


Okay, given the current score of this answer (-17), I think it's pretty clear that most people disagree with what I said before. @user2357112 and @jmac brought up some good points as to why in the comments, so I'll pull them here for future reference.

The help center seems to disagree: "Editing is important for keeping questions and answers clear, relevant, and up-to-date. If you are not comfortable with the idea of your contributions being collaboratively edited by other trusted users, this may not be the site for you." – user2357112

Comments are temporary. They shouldn't contain good information. That's why we have the ability to edit posts (even non-CW ones) to add that information. The correct thing would be to edit responsibly, because it is actually easier to handle a poor edit than it is to handle a poor comment (which you can't downvote, and can only flag, and would require a moderator to actually figure out whether or not the comment has merit as a resource). So edit early, edit often. – jmac

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(This doesn't even touch on the problems that could arise if the link turns out to be malicious or spam.) –  Dennis Meng Jun 10 at 1:20
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The help center seems to disagree: "Editing is important for keeping questions and answers clear, relevant, and up-to-date. If you are not comfortable with the idea of your contributions being collaboratively edited by other trusted users, this may not be the site for you." –  user2357112 Jun 10 at 5:09
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You shouldn't edit malicious or spam links into other people's answers, but that's not particular to editing. You shouldn't post malicious or spam links at all. The potential for malicious or spam links shouldn't stop people from editing any more than it should stop them from posting. –  user2357112 Jun 10 at 5:12
    
I agree on that second point. For the first point, I'm not that surprised there's something like that given the downvotes. I guess I'm more used to a non-CW answer being representative of the original poster, and letting the poster decide what to add on (and letting additional answers cover other parts/perspectives that he/she may not have touched on). Editing CW posts are of course, absolutely fair game –  Dennis Meng Jun 10 at 5:24
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Comments are temporary. They shouldn't contain good information. That's why we have the ability to edit posts (even non-CW ones) to add that information. The correct thing would be to edit responsibly, because it is actually easier to handle a poor edit than it is to handle a poor comment (which you can't downvote, and can only flag, and would require a moderator to actually figure out whether or not the comment has merit as a resource). So edit early, edit often. –  jmac Jun 10 at 6:48
    
@user2357112 Those are good comments for the question itself, and possibly worth posting as an answer. –  chepner Jun 10 at 17:03
    
Given that it's pretty clear that people disagree with my answer, I'll leave it up long enough for him to pull his stuff out into an answer and I'll delete mine after. –  Dennis Meng Jun 10 at 19:03
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@DennisMeng Why would you delete your answer? Just as upvoted answers are good for displaying agreement, isn't downvoted questions good for clarifying disagreement in the same, but inverted, way? –  Alex Jun 11 at 7:41
    
@Alex Sure, but the assumption was that he'd thoroughly debunk my reasoning as well in the pulled-out answer (so basically everything I have would be covered there). If that doesn't happen, then yeah, I'd just keep this. (Of course it stings writing an answer with this low of a score, but I've learned more by posting this than by keeping quiet) –  Dennis Meng Jun 11 at 7:43
    
(Oh, and I assume you meant "downvoted answers". Letting you know now while you can still edit) –  Dennis Meng Jun 11 at 7:44
    
@DennisMeng Doh, missed it by the second... –  Alex Jun 11 at 7:47
    
@DennisMeng - I'd say keep it anyway - there is no reputation gain/loss on meta, but answer show what (and more importantly why) community generally disagree with. If everyone expresses just one common point of view life would be at very least boring... –  Alexei Levenkov Jun 11 at 7:55
    
@AlexeiLevenkov True. Though in the spirit of comments being temporary, I'm tempted to pull the relevant parts of the discussion into the answer (so that if these comments also get deleted, we don't lose the discussion over why my answer is wrong) –  Dennis Meng Jun 11 at 7:57

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