We have a user who keeps making edits that actually change nothing. He's just cutting and pasting the code in an attempt to get the edit points.

The user in question is omiel and here are some example edits:

Is it possible to stop this user from making edits?

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The user is adding syntax highlighting hints. These are not merely cut-and-paste edits (which would not work anyway). –  Martijn Pieters Jun 7 at 18:42
    
2 out of 3 of those edits where rejected anyway, if he keeps this up he'll eventually get banned. –  Sam Jun 7 at 18:43
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The user is keeping it up, and the reviewers aren't doing anything about it. He has 44 edit suggestions approved, and 4 edit suggestions rejected, so it doesn't look like he's getting banned in the near future. Seems like its time I hit the suggested edits queue... –  Santa Claus Jun 7 at 18:56

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up vote 11 down vote accepted

The user is adding syntax highlighting hints. These are not merely cut-and-paste edits (which would not work anyway, there is a minimum amount that needs to have changed before an edit suggestion can enter the system).

Make sure you look at the markdown diff as well as the difference in rendered output:

markdown diff

It is always a good idea to check both views; link changes are hard to detect otherwise, for example, you don't want a spammer sneak in a nefarious link with a innocuous looking edit.

Edits like these may be rejected when they are too minor; e.g. if this is the only thing the user edited and left other problems in place. If the user receives enough such edits then they'll automatically receive a (temporary) ban.

Certainly, going around and editing only to put in syntax highlight hints is not very useful and I'd reject any such edits.

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Ah, didn't see the difference until I looked in the markdown. And I didn't know there was automatic temporary banning. Still fairly new at this reviewing bit. Thanks for pointing that out. –  Styphon Jun 7 at 18:45
    
The suggestion wouldn't even be submittable without an actual change of at least six characters, @Styphon -- and that excludes whitespace. –  Josh Caswell Jun 7 at 18:54
    
I don't make that kind of edit, but frankly I'd let them through because syntax highlighting can be helpful for readability, and makes it way easier to visually anchor where important things are happening (e.g. function definitions, stack variable allocations, heap variable allocations, explicit casts). –  Parthian Shot Jun 8 at 3:29

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