I stumbled upon this question which was closed as a duplicate of this one and got to wondering why duplicate questions aren't just deleted, I quickly realized that it must be because it makes the problem the questions talk about more searchable (the problem being difficult to search is likely the problem it has duplicates in the first place)

There's a problem with that though. This does indeed increase the searchability of the problem, but it leads the traffic to the duplicates (of which there might be several). Since every way of naming or addressing the problem now has its own question, the traffic the problem gets is spread out among those questions. Of course everyone also visits the original, but that one won't show up unless you use the right terminology when researching.

What I'd suggest is to add the tags, titles (and maybe text) of the duplicates to the original as hidden text, so when you use uncommon terminology when googling a problem you're having, the original question (with lots of traffic and thus ranked highly) will show up in the results.

Here's a proof that it is not already possible to find the original question, even when looking for all the words in the title of the duplicate, a key word of the title of the original and "stack overflow".

What are everyone's thoughts on this?

edit: Since people apparently don't see my point, I'll throw in an analogy. Suppose you're building colorful towers to attract animals who are lured in by color. Some are lured in by red and others by green and they both prefer high towers. Now if you had a limited amount of red and green bricks, would you build two towers, one green and one red, or would you build one high tower, using both colors?

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The duplicates link back, you see. So whatever you search lead--eventually--to the answered version. (Actually there are a few bad cases of circular duplicates but those should be dealt with, and a few more cases of the original eventually getting deleted but that implies that the duplicate should also be deleted.) –  dmckee Jun 7 at 1:20

3 Answers 3

Log out and open that first link... Stack Overflow will automatically redirect you to the original question.

Yup. Most folks visiting the duplicate never actually see the duplicate! So we get the benefits of the keywords, without forcing folks to click through anything. The duplicate serves as a signpost, directing folks to where the answers are without getting in the way.

This doesn't happen if the duplicate has answers though. So if you come across a duplicate with answers that's getting a lot of traffic, flag it and ask a moderator to merge it with the original.

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I'm sorry, I just don't understand what the problem is. You say:

This does indeed increase the searchability of the problem, but it leads the traffic to the duplicates (of which there might be several). Since every way of naming or addressing the problem now has its own question, the traffic the problem gets is spread out among those questions.

Yes, that's the reason we keep the duplicates around. They provide alternative phrasings of the problem, which people might search for. When they do, they find the duplicate question.

That is not a problem, of course. As soon as they get there, they see the giant gray box at the top that says "this question is a duplicate; it already has an answer here". So they click "here" and read the answer.

I guess the traffic is "spread out", but why does that matter? They all get to the right place.

You also say:

Of course everyone also visits the original, but that one won't show up unless you use the right terminology when researching.

Again, this is the reason we keep the duplicates around instead of deleting them. They serve as "pointers" to the master question, with alternative yet common search terms. Because the master question won't show up unless people use the right search terms, we use the duplicates as pointers to the master question.

Here's a proof that it is not already possible to find the original question, even when looking for all the words in the title of the duplicate, a key word of the title of the original and "stack oevrflow".

Sure it is. The very first Google hit is this question. At the very top is a big gray box that says "This question already has an answer here" and links to the master question. You can't miss it. Two clicks and you have your answer. Tell me again, what's the problem here?

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The problem is that the duplicate questions have less traffic and are thus less highly ranked in search engines. Of course, if I'm searching the entire title of the duplicate question, I'm going to end up with the duplicate question as a search result, which does very neatly point to the right question. But if my search query gets a bit less specific, the low traffic on that question is going to push it down the search results. If we combine the terminologies in one question though, no matter what you search for, there is going to be a relevant question with a high ranking on search engines. –  overactor Jun 7 at 7:24
    
Stack Overflow questions get exceptionally high billing on search engine queries as it is. I don't see this as being a real problem. –  Cody Gray Jun 7 at 7:30
    
Point taken, it might not be a big problem, but that doesn't mean a slightly improved system might not be helpful, now or at some point in the future. –  overactor Jun 7 at 7:40
    
@overactor users without an account actually don't even see the duplicate question (if that duplicate doesn't have an answer). If they find a duplicate via a search engine, they are automatically and silently redirected to the main question. So the traffic is always directed to the main question for most everyone except for users of the site who are logged in. –  psubsee2003 Jun 7 at 8:02

It is a StackExchange SEO (Search Engine Optimization) angle. The theory is that it is likelier that Google visitors will find the canonical answer since there are more keywords to will lead to it. Good for business.

Google does appear to be able to curate it well enough, while SO ranking is extraordinarily high and blowing everybody away, I don't usually get more than a handful of hits. YMMV. If you want to broaden your search and get more hits from SO for your query then you can put the site selector in your query. Put site:stackoverflow.com first.

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