As a daily visitor I should first report that the quality of questions for the tags I monitor is on a clear up-tick. So whatever's being done in the background is having a favourable result.

Having said that, I wanted to check on the question type that has been been appearing more frequently. It goes along the lines of...

I have some doodlies that need to be co-mingled with some squats. (...blah blah blah...) I would like to use humpers on the carumpers to accomplish that. I searched and could not find a definitive answer. Is it OK?

Technically, the correct answer consists of a single word:

Yes.

A more cynical response would be...

Do tell us how you got on finding out about this.

And the SO "party line" is to close vote on the grounds of 'cannot be reproduced' or 'too broad' etc. There are no specific grounds to close on 'a yes/no question is not suitable', and indeed some of them are interesting. And against that backdrop I see both higher ups (as vaunted role models) and noobs (looking for low hanging fruit) taking a shot at an answer...

Where is the line drawn on yes/no questions?

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I guess that Yes/No questions (or more like polls) could be useful in some situations, giving the community the ability to quickly send the OP in a suitable direction based on the "common/best practice" decided by the vote, with the ability to also detail (if you want) your choice in a comment or answer –  Catalin Deaconescu Jun 6 at 13:52
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A problem with those kinds of question is often also that they are worded not like "can I do X?" answer "no" but worded as "tell be how to do x". and then there is no real way to answer them, as answering "no you can not do it" will get your answer deleted, but there is no way to answer it other than with "no". –  PlasmaHH Jun 6 at 14:14
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IMO, the problem isn't about the binary question, but about the binary answer. There are very few situations where answers cannot be expanded on from a yes/no. –  gitsitgo Jun 6 at 14:19
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I'm sorry to say that I've not noticed any improvement in c++, php, javascript or mysql. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Jun 6 at 17:18
    
There are few situations in which you can't be a gas spewing windbag, if so inclined, even though a simple yes or no suffices. –  Kaz Jun 6 at 18:14
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Should yes or no questions be put on hold? - I find it ridiculous how different essentially the same question gets treated sometimes (the first isn't phrased as well, but I mean - -11 and closed vs +10). –  Dukeling Jun 6 at 18:16
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I find these questions are almost always a guise for debugging help. At least in the Java space these questions are almost always accompanied by code with obvious errors. That is why they are closed, usually as "unclear what you're asking" or "lacks minimal information" because what the OP needs to do is tell us what the problem is, in other words, these questions are often actually a code dump. –  Radiodef Jun 6 at 18:56
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So you are talking just yes/no questions and not say should I eat vanilla ice cream or chocolate ice cream tonight? Yes/no could either be factual or opinion (close those) while the other binary question that I model is more opinion (close those). Either way, opinion creeping into these questions is the big problem. –  demongolem Jun 6 at 18:58
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Many of these questions come in the form "Is this OK?" to which you sometimes just say: "Yes, in all regards.". The last part to get over the character requirements. –  usr Jun 6 at 23:24
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Answer: between the yes and the no. That line is actually called a slash, virgule, or solidus –  dfeuer Jun 7 at 15:22
    
@dfeuer, nicely played! Thanks for the smile today :) –  Gayot Fow Jun 7 at 15:47

1 Answer 1

up vote 20 down vote accepted

I would say that if a question can ONLY be answered meaningfully with 'Yes/No', then it should be closed.

However, that's not why most of these are closed. Most of these are either asking questions like "Is my program good?" or "Did I do this [complicated thing] right?" - and often that's not a good question, anyway, binary or not. The former is basically an opinion, while the latter is either an opinion or often too long to be answerable here.

The right way to deal with otherwise-acceptable questions, ie, a question that would be good if it were not a yes/no question, is to edit it to be that otherwise-acceptable question. "Can I write a bogum by escarpating a humphus?" might be a binary question, but if "How do you write a bogum?" is a good question, and a good answer might (or might not) be "Escarpate a humphus", then edit the question to be that, and include the "escarpating a humphus" as "I tried...", which we always like to see.

These are often a subset of XY problem questions, which means they have a problem, but they don't ask how to solve the problem; they instead ask about the answer they picked. Sometimes that's okay, but often a better question is the original problem.

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@gnat Nice find, that's a much better explanation of the same answer. –  Joe Jun 6 at 14:25
    
@Joe, thanks. I have been interpreting some as "I am having an argument with my boss/colleague who says I am doing it wrong. Please support my point of view so I can show it to him/her and thereby win the argument." But's that is an INFERRED message. For all I know, it could be professional curiosity. –  Gayot Fow Jun 6 at 23:31
    
In cases where I can infer what the OP is actually seeking, I sometimes explicitly state what I think they're asking, and answer that. I'm loath to edit other people's questions to say what I think they wanted to know, because my inferences aren't always correct. Further, while I appreciate some edits to my answers that fix genuine mistakes, there are other times I've happened upon answers of mine which were edited to change something which was correct but counterintuitive to something which was intuitive but wrong. In some cases, that's been an impetus to my improving the answer... –  supercat Jun 7 at 15:29
    
...so as to make clear why my answer, though counterintuitive, is in fact correct, but perhaps what's needed is a form of edit which would request moderation by the original poster who could then accept the edit, reject, or use it as a basis for further editing. BTW, if I see that an edit has been proposed for a post of mine, and has been rejected, is there any way as the author of the post I can counteract that rejection and give the editor credit for the revision? –  supercat Jun 7 at 15:36

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