I recently accumulated 2k reputation on Stack Overflow, and with it the ability to review edits and flags. In community spirit, it's something I've taken to doing occasionally when I've got a few spare minutes.

I was very surprised to discover that, mixed in with the valid edits, are random items that are apparently designed to "test" that the reviewer is "paying attention".

When I've been confronted with one of these, I go through the following emotions:

  • Confusion, because the "test" posts are either valid items, or randomly-altered edits that make little sense.
  • Annoyance, because it generally takes longer than normal to decide what to do with the item.
  • Anger, because Stack Overflow is treating me like a small child, "testing" to make sure I'm not being naughty.

None of these things are good.

I've no idea what would happen if I "failed" one of these "tests" (I haven't, as yet), but I'm sufficiently irritated by their appearance that I'm thinking I might just not bother in future, and leave the work up to everyone else. Which is, surely, not the desired result?

Are they really necessary, or perhaps just turn up overly frequently? Surely, the whole idea of not awarding the ability to check the review queue until you've got 2k reputation is that this is the point where we trust people to do the right thing, so we don't need to test them? Is it not actually quite likely that this is counterproductive - putting more users off dealing with reviews than it is catching people who do it lazily?

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having only read the title, yes, yes it is. –  Servy May 28 at 15:31
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A quick search on Meta.SE for "robo-review" should explain. –  Jonathan Garber May 28 at 15:31
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It's not that bad. Just do a few hundred more edits, and you'll be able to spot audits from a mile away. –  Sam I am May 28 at 15:33
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We tried trusting reviewers. It didn't work out. Spam edits and outright vandalism were being approved, because people found ways to click themselves through to a badge. –  Martijn Pieters May 28 at 15:34
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Minus 11 for asking a reasonable question? Wow. I better stay off meta in future. Thanks to all who gave me useful responses. –  Matt Thrower May 28 at 16:25
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@MattThrower You weren't just asking a question though. You were making the assertion that the audits are harmful, and there is the overall tone suggesting that audits should be removed. The community here loves our audits, because we know just how unbearable reviewing is likely to become without them. Had the tone of the question been more inquisitive, asking why they are helpful, rather than asserting that they are not, you would have found a much better reception to the question. –  Servy May 28 at 17:09
    
People can EASILY make bots, that will auto spam random actions on reviews. However, good point! Bots can still check if a post is an 'attention test', and can simply skip it. –  Victor2748 Nov 2 at 20:50

3 Answers 3

up vote 20 down vote accepted

Are they really necessary?

Yes, yes they are. There are actually a lot of people that fail these audits (enough failures results in a temporary ban). Before they were added the suggested edit system had gotten to the point that the entire system had broken down. The vast majority of people using the system were people literally approving every single edit without ever reading it. No edit could ever get rejected because 2-3 people would pretty much always approve it before 2-3 actual reviewers would be capable of rejecting it. Editors of course learned to abuse this and began spamming tons of horrendous edits for free rep, or even spam/vandalist edits knowing that they'd actually get approved, and what's worse they were getting approved.

Of course, this isn't the only change that was made to the system to address the problem. There were quite a few actually, but audits were one of the larger changes, and one of the more effective of the changes implemented.

There are still some users like this in the system, even now. The audits don't keep them all out, but it does reduce their numbers to small enough that they don't outnumber the real reviewers so much, making it noticeably less likely that problematic edits will be approved. It's still a major problem, and more does need to be done to improve the review system, but currently it's a flawed but still beneficial system. A year and a half ago the system itself was actively harmful.

Surely, the whole idea of not awarding the ability to check the review queue until you've got 2k reputation is that this is the point where we trust people to do the right thing, so we don't need to test them?

One would hope so. Sadly this is not the case. There are, even now, plenty of bad reviewers that have 2k+ rep. There are horrendous reviewers that have tens of thousands of rep. It's depressing, but true.

Is it not actually quite likely that this is counterproductive - putting more users off dealing with reviews than it is catching people who do it lazily?

Not really, no. Real qualified reviewers are not put off by audits all that much. They're designed to be reviews that you can spot in a fraction of a second and get on with your day. The frustration of dealing with all of the crappy reviewers is far, far, far worse.

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"The frustration of dealing with all of the crappy reviewers is far, far, far worse." ... so much so that users have in the past expressed their dislike of the review process to such an extent that they stopped reviewing. –  Bart May 28 at 15:39
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I also talk a little more about the effect that audits have on reviewers here: meta.stackexchange.com/a/228744/135615 . They are indeed vital to the system, and a very effective technical solution to a social problem. Also per the line "There are horrendous reviewers that have tens of thousands of rep", there are several 10k+ users that have been banned from review over 20 times. Yeah, it's sad sometimes. –  Brad Larson May 28 at 17:29

Yes, those audits are badly needed.

We have a lot of people who are blindly approving incredibly poor edits, presumably so they can get their "Reviewer" and "Steward" badges. Even edits that replace an entire post with spam have been known to be rubber-stamped!

How to deal with them - well, suppose the audit was a legitimate edit. You would reject those edits. Usually, an audit is a suggested edit that defaces the post, so "vandalism" is an appropriate rejection reason.

As for the results - the one thing that really seems to annoy serious reviewers, is seeing horrible edits approved quicker than they can reject them. Take a look at The robo-approvers are killing my will to review edits, and notice that at the moment of this writing, it has a score of no less than 290 (!)
The review audits have managed to stop a few of these robo-approvers. So if anything, they encourage the serious reviewers.

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I've no idea what would happen if I "failed" one of these "tests"

If you fail one, you get a warning, and if you fail too many of these tests, you get review-banned for some time.

Is it really necessary to test the attention of users reviewing edits?

Yes. One of the purpose of these tests is to stop robo-reviewers: people that always click the "Approve" button to get the review badges as fast as possible. If they fail too many audits (that's how these tests are called), they get review-banned to avoid bad reviews.

They are not only to stop robo-reviewers, they are also there to keep the reviews good reviews. It might be that someone is not a robo-reviewer, but that that person thinks that some edits/posts are okay and can be approved while they are not okay. The audit system prevents that people can keep making bad reviews without being warned/banned.

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