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I've now been using Stack Overflow for more than a year. I have noticed that there has been a certain rise in the downvoting for the questions. This seems obvious and non-argumentative if the question is irrelevant, duplicate, too broad, confusing, has grammatical blunders or such reasons.

But most of the times, the down-voters downvote the question without any of the above reasons and also they don't give an effort so as to why the question was downvoted.

With this, sincere questions and difficult problems, even though they lack grammatical perfection, don't make a place at Stack Overflow.

I feel that there should be serious self-realization on this issue. Why is the rise in downvotes growing so much?

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marked as duplicate by gnat, Cody Gray, Martijn Pieters, rene, brasofilo May 28 at 10:00

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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The rise in downvotes is not a bad thing in itself - historically, a lot of really bad questions were not downvoted at all. But of course, this shouldn't mean that okay content gets downvoted as well. What everyone can do when a question is good, but not well expressed, is to edit it. –  Pekka 웃 May 28 at 6:30
    
@Pekka웃 - I agree with you. People do have a right to voice sincere questions here. See we have a down-vote for this question too. –  Robert Langdon May 28 at 6:32
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I would be more interested in this question if there were a) specific examples of questions downvoted "without any above reason" b) evidence of a trend in downvotes based on a Data Explorer query or something similar. –  David Robinson May 28 at 6:33
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If downvoters do not explain their downvotes, how do you know that their reason for downvoting is not one of the things you described? –  Daniël Knippers May 28 at 6:33
    
Incidentally, my answer here does have a plot that shows that the percentage of votes cast that were downvotes has been slowly increasing since January 2011. This does not necessarily indicate "There is downvoting for most questions", nor does it show anything about the reasons. –  David Robinson May 28 at 6:33
    
@DavidRobinson - We are not here for a statistical battle. We can make out just by looking at the number of questions asked, their content from all angles and their down-votes. –  Robert Langdon May 28 at 6:34
    
@DaniëlKnippers - This is where we lack in. The down-voters should try and edit first if possible, otherwise they should atleast specify why the question has been down-voted. Just pulling down somebody only because you have the right at the site does not seem ethical, professional and nor does it makes any sense. –  Robert Langdon May 28 at 6:37
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If there has been a rise of downvotes (which I'm skeptical of), it is because there has been a corresponding rise in low-quality questions. –  Cody Gray May 28 at 6:37
    
@RobertLangdon In no way was I looking for a "statistical battle." However, if you want to discuss the "content from all angles," you should bring up specific examples (there's no way to look at "the content" of all StackOverflow questions at the same time) –  David Robinson May 28 at 6:37
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It is then our responsibility to guide the newbies to ask good quality questions Every new member of the site was required to read through a page called "How to Ask," and check a box saying they had read it. Why is it not their responsibility to follow those rules? –  David Robinson May 28 at 6:42
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The down-voters should try and edit first if possible, otherwise they should atleast specify why the question has been down-voted.. That is not feasible. Stack Overflow gets 8,000+ new questions every day. –  Pekka 웃 May 28 at 6:44
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Downvoting isn't "bashing," and it shouldn't be taken personally. It's about the content of the post: it's a way to both signal that it needs to be improved and get it off the front page of the site. –  David Robinson May 28 at 6:59
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Not every downvote is justified; far from it. But downvotes are a fundamentally necessary tool of quality control on a site that sees plenty of bad questions. –  Pekka 웃 May 28 at 7:12
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Voting is different on Meta. But apart from that, your question is arguably not bringing anything new to the table that hasn't been discussed ad nauseam a million times before. Also you're not presenting any specific examples of questions that you feel are unfairly downvoted. I assume those factors are the source of most of the down-votes. I don't disagree there is a voting culture on SO that is partly problematic and overly bureaucratic but a question addressing that needs more "meat" IMO –  Pekka 웃 May 28 at 7:15
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How do downvotes affect morale? I am literally bumfuzzled by the number of people who take anonymous online content rating personally. (And no, I reject that I have an obligation to teach anyone anything. If anything, new users to a community have an obligation to educate themselves of and follow community norms.) –  Cody Gray May 28 at 7:21

1 Answer 1

up vote -2 down vote accepted

I think there are (at least) two sides to this.

  • One being that the quality of questions seems also to be decreasing (at least subjectively: Socrates)
  • The other one that people seem to be more inclined to downvote since there is no cost to it (but they might get even an award for it, depending on what they have already earned ^^)

IMHO the margin between "sincere" (long time) users and those with little experience (in programming, as well as asking questions) is getting bigger, as more and more new people are coming, and at the same time others getting better. (There seems to be very little gray in between)

  • Add to that people who are just trolling, for example those who think it is funny to downvote a question that is about down-voting like this one.
  • Also those same users that have been asking stupid questions, thoughtlessly looking down on others, when they start to gain a few points.
  • ...

These all are general things, but they all increase with the number of people that see answeres. Also those that look at a question and don't do anything might increase a lot (which is not that much noticed though). As David Robinson has shown in his plot, it overall rises.

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Good to see that atleast you have agreed a part to what I've said. For others, they don't accept 'The other one that people seem to be more inclined to downvote since there is no cost to it (but they might get even an award for it, depending on what they have already earned ^^)' and 'Add to that people who are just trolling, for example those who think it is funny to downvote a question that is about down-voting like this one.' –  Robert Langdon May 28 at 7:06
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No one is "trolling" here. On Meta, if people profoundly disagree with the thesis of the question, they will downvote it. It is a quick and easy way of symbolizing disagreement. It is not an attempt at humor. –  Cody Gray May 28 at 7:31
    
@CodyGray: Thx for clarifying! Still I would not be so sure that everyone here is as sincere as you. Saying that "no one" is trolling here, in my eyes is a huge overstatement. –  Levit May 28 at 8:06
    
@CodyGray: Well maybe the example for trolling was off, I was not acustomed to the system on meta, sry for that! But still, I think the point of users trolling is valid (even though the example was faulty). –  Levit Jun 4 at 13:31
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Yes, there is frequent trolling on Meta. The questions get dispatched and deleted relatively quickly, though. Incidentally, it's one of the big advantages of our voting system. –  Cody Gray Jun 4 at 13:32

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