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This question got 2045 upvotes: How can I check if one string contains another substring in JavaScript?

My jaw dropped when I read it. Seriously, does such a simple and easily answerable question deserve so many upvotes? Even worse: the answer got 3195 votes.

In my opinion, that's not a really good question. It seems the OP didn't try to do any research. I might be wrong, but I'm sure he would have found the answer by himself with some 3-minute googling. This is usually not the kind of question we want on SO.

As an example, this question has a score of -2: how to convert string to date format at javascript. Yet, it's the same kind of question ("Can you tell me how to do ___ even though I didn't search on Google before coming here?")

However, I know it might be useful for others (somebody could be searching on Google that exact question, and they would find the answer more rapidly), and I'm not saying it shouldn't be answered at all, but why on Earth did so many people (we're not talking about a few, but thousands of people !) think it deserved an upvote? And how is it possible for an answer to get more than 3000 votes for simply telling to use indexOf?

Usually, such questions would be heavily downvoted because they are bad questions, since they don't show some research effort.

Personally, I would give them of score of 1 or 2, but no more. They're not so useful.

What do you think?

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marked as duplicate by Cupcake, Josh Caswell, gnat, me how, Stijn May 27 at 9:40

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

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I think Life isn't fair –  gnat May 27 at 9:17

2 Answers 2

The question is over four years old. In the early days of Stack Overflow we weren't so...stringent about the kind of questions we'd accept.

Further, if you were to do a little googling now, this question and its answers would be very high in the search results. I'd be surprised if it wasn't number one.

As for the other question you mention, well, it was asked only yesterday. Such simple questions don't do so well here.

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Is there a query for how many of those votes occurred after the post got CW status? –  Matthew Lundberg May 27 at 3:57
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@MatthewLundberg: You can always look at the timeline –  PlasmaHH May 27 at 9:20

The question with the upvotes is very old and in the early days of SO. Remember that SO is meant to build up a database of good questions and answers, and that questions that can be answered by RTFM are not per se unwelcome here.

The question servers a very good purpose: It attracts people that google (or search the site) for answers to exactly that question. This will prevent a some people from asking the question again. Then it servers as a good point to close others as duplicates.

Now you might ask why so many votes? I would say, simply because the question is so long around, and so often searched for. People will often express with their vote "Yes, I wanted to ask the same" and then look at the answers and say "well, this I understood and it makes the answer clear" and upvote that too.

Up and downvotes should be entirely based on the content of the question/answer, not on the amount of other people having voted already. So if those people think they would have asked the same question, then by all means, let them upvote.

Now for the question with the downvotes. As you can see, it has been closed as a duplicate. That's the whole deal. It shows no research effort at all, and has already been asked. If you follow the short chain of duplicates, then you will arrive at this question which is also very basic, but also has quite some upvotes around.

Such basic questions will almost always be downvoted and closed as duplicates, because they are so basic, they have already been asked. Sometimes they are just downvoted because of the downvoter thinking that this is so basic, in the whole history of SO, this must have been asked somewhere already.

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