Most of the questions I've asked have been answered with theoretical, sometimes vague solutions, without any proper code example or reference. Is this preferred to answering with exemplification or code reference?

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No, it is preferred to give a good, quality answer. I find that answers that include code samples get more upvotes; clearly people feel that answers with code are preferred. –  Martijn Pieters May 26 at 11:27
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When I look for a solution, a code sample says a thousand words. This doesn't mean that I want pure code though: knowing why you do something in the code or what some obscure call does is important. –  Jeroen Vannevel May 26 at 11:33
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It all depends. Sometimes people "just want that damn code", other times people complain about answers that "just give code and don't teach anything". It really depends. –  Kerrek SB May 26 at 11:45
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Out of your 10 questions you can't interpolate that "most" have been answered vaguely. Some of your inquiries ask a bit generically for approach directions, so naturally won't be answered with code samples. Rather than prematurely accepting answers, edit your post if you require specific topic clarification. –  mario May 26 at 12:03
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Related: Should an answer contain a SSCCE –  Cody Gray May 26 at 13:30
    
A good code example can explain a lot, but there is an art to writing good code examples - just putting any old code in is not helpful. Some of the criticisms of answering with code can be addressed with style of example code, e.g. giving a general structure but putting in // ADD YOUR BEHAVIOUR HERE for the details leaves the poster some problem solving to do. –  Will May 29 at 14:13

2 Answers 2

up vote 57 down vote accepted

I'm sorry.. but as for what you've been noticing, really:

You should ask better questions

If you check the questions you speak of, whenever you provided clear code, you got code back, in every single answer that provided practical code - a practical and good answer has been received back.

In questions that provided lacking pseudo code, or an unclear question, you have received no code, or lacking code back.

The rest of your questions are unclear.

That said: Answers should be as clear as possible, sometimes code is relevant, sometimes it is not. There is no clear cut rule for what's the best way to explain something. A lot of good answers contain code and some don't. Including code often helps but is not a must.


Appendix A:

Let's look at these questions:

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Oh, the delicious irony of "in fact is a syntax erorr..." –  David Thomas May 26 at 20:03
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Sort of, what you wrote in your answer is 'syntax erorr' (not 'syntax error'), and a syntax error is, often (not always), a simple typo. I just found it funny is all. :) –  David Thomas May 26 at 20:07
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Looking at the question titles - you shouldn't attempt to tag your questions in the title itself. This has little benefit. Instead use the tagging system –  Burhan Khalid May 27 at 4:29
    
@Benjamin Gruenbaum Regarding my LDAP Smart Card question: What is the difference between that question and this one: stackoverflow.com/questions/663402/… ? How is mine too broad and that one not? And what exactly isn't clear? This question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3066421/… is also a syntax error. It has 22 upvotes. Mine was just downvoted to -1. What is the difference? –  Peter Noble May 27 at 6:53
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@razvan.peter Some older questions are not good examples of what is on-topic these days. Back in '09, that question may have been acceptable and up-voted accordingly. It's off-topic now and I've voted to close. People also up-vote off-topic questions simply because they found it useful, even if it is on the wrong site. –  Duncan May 28 at 13:35
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Pertaining to your last example, can we add a "clueless" close reason? –  Gordon Linoff May 29 at 13:54

IMO, you should (must?) include a good, simple, illustrative code example in your answer when it's relevant and reasonably possible. If the question is vague, you can also clarify it with code. This is a site from programmers - programmers are supposed to write and understand code.

A picture speaks a thousand words.

For programmers, code is like a picture.

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But with all pictures, they themselves do not constitute the entire story. –  Makoto May 27 at 4:33
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@Makoto - I said include :-) –  Vector May 27 at 5:37
    
Yes, a picture is an apt metaphor. You would never include a picture without a caption, would you? –  Cody Gray May 27 at 11:09
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@CodyGray Captions are especially important if half your audience is blind. –  R. Martinho Fernandes May 27 at 15:51
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And please don't include a picture of your code –  Andy May 28 at 15:46

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