This question was started from this discussion but is about any similar incidence.

In it, user3669279 has posted a classically poor question. I downvoted, gave a close vote and a brief comment asking for a minimal, runnable example.


Normally that would be the end of the story. Oddly, though, user3669279 was unfazed and responded with the welcoming

Okay, now I understand. I'll get right to it

The edits show that, although user3669279 isn't particularly good at this, there's definitely an earnest attempt. Other problems involve putting relevant information in the comments (which I will edit into the question later) and a dire lack of description of the problem.


I feel that it's helpful to teach user3669279 how to ask a good question, and I definitely feel it's possible. I'm not sure how to do so, though, as Stack Overflow seems particularly unsuited to the task.

I have removed my downvote; the questioner has shown effort. I haven't yet retracted my close vote. But from there I'm stuck.

  • How do I give guidance on question writing without sticking it in an answer (seeing as it's not an answer)? The comments section seems restricting, and not everything should be me editing the question myself.

  • The question is now sufficient that I can answer the question, at least as it is posed. Should I do so immediately? Should I instead wait until I have helped user3669279 make a good question, and lead into the answer?

  • Should I include extra information in my answer that will help user3669279 but remains largely unrelated to the posed question?

  • Should I remove the close vote, or should I put back the downvote? Is it more important to be true to the goals of Stack Overflow or to help create a high quality question asker?

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I would encourage the user to improve the question if it is still open or to ask the question again in an improved format when it is closed. And I would give him some tips what he did wrong in the current layout of his question. –  Trilarion May 26 at 8:07
    
It is entirely up to you to decide how you want to invest your time. Looks like it got a happy ending, that is not so common so do not assume your time will consistently pay off. Also pretty important to avoid this wearing you down, the universe never runs out of numbered users. Picking a specific tag that you favor is a good strategy. [pygames] does remarkably well for a gaming tag btw. –  Hans Passant May 26 at 12:26
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Careful, you are veering dangerously close to the assumption that votes are cast on users, rather than on posts. If the question is low-quality, it should be downvoted, regardless of how eager the person is to learn and how much you like them. –  Cody Gray May 26 at 12:48
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I want to learn. Can somebody please write a compiler for me? I really want to learn. –  devnull May 26 at 16:57
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When I find someone who wants to learn and is grateful for the time invested I think this is a great situation. Few people are worth being coached. –  usr May 26 at 17:13
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Votes reflect the question, not the poster. It should not take 20 questions of back-and-forth just to figure out what the actual problem is; which is a classic sign of a poor question that needs down-voting or closure straight out. –  Burhan Khalid May 27 at 9:22
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@Trilarion It sounds like you're suggesting they post a new question about the same problem if the current one is closed. That's definitely not correct; they should be fixing the question that was closed until it's at a sufficient standard to warrant being reopened. –  Anthony Grist May 27 at 9:22
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@AnthonyGrist You are certainly right by the rules. However my experience is that questions are rarely reopened even if they are edited to a satisfactory level. And also the downvotes are rarely undone when the question is edited. So I find the situation not really that satisfying. –  Trilarion May 27 at 9:28
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3 Answers 3

up vote 12 down vote accepted

How do I give guidance on question writing without sticking it in an answer (seeing as it's not an answer)?

Comments, chat, and by example (editing) are the correct ways to do this. Information on question writing does not belong in the answer to a Stack Overflow question. At best it would belong in the answer to a Meta Stack Overflow question, but the interaction required to clarify or improve a question is precisely what the comment feature was introduced for.

The information you provide about posting a good question isn't going to be relevant to anyone else with the same coding problem, especially after the original which you're answering is fixed. Stack Overflow answers are meant to avoid all that chit-chat, banter, and other not-to-the-point information you often have to wade through on forums and other sites. You come here, find a question that matches your problem, and then go straight to reading the answer, which should have the solution you need and nothing but.

The question is now sufficient that I can answer the question, at least as it is posed. Should I do so immediately?

Sure.* Whether you, the OP, or someone else edits the question to make it answerable is irrelevant, as long as it gets done. If it isn't done by the question owner in a reasonable period of time, it's best if you do it. It's also in your self-interest (assuming you're concerned about your answer sticking around). It's a good thing for the site's upkeep if you help curate answers on your questions and questions you've answered.

Should I include extra information in my answer that will help user3669279 but remains largely unrelated to the posed question?

Absolutely not. See above.

Should I remove the close vote, or should I put back the downvote?

If you believe the question is answerable, and demonstrate that by answering it, it seems hypocritical to also vote to close; the meaning of closure is "not answerable in a way suitable to this site". I do think you should retract that vote. As for the downvote, it's a little strange to answer a question you consider poor, lacking effort, and so on (reasons for downvoting), but if you truly think that it's an answerable question that's not very good for the site, then that combination could be appropriate.


*Although it looks to me like an awfully localized question, not likely to have any usefulness to anyone else.

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And this is the answer I expected someone to write much earlier. The problem is that both viewpoints seem valid and without moderator intervention I've hardly a deciding reason to support one over the other! // I can see chat working if it allows somewhat long-form posts, so I might move the stuff you edited out to there. // Also, would it actually be reasonable to have a post on Meta that I invite OP to? I would have guessed not, but... –  Veedrac May 27 at 12:38
    
Moderator intervention shouldn't be required for things like this -- the mores of the site are generally community-generated. Moderators are (mostly) enforcers, or -- as they like to say -- janitors, not policy makers. That said, BoltClock♦ left a comment below Deduplicator's answer reinforcing my points here. –  Josh Caswell May 27 at 18:31
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The first sentence of this question is (currently):

I finally got the collision down so that when my mouse is hovering over the circles and you click the left mouse button, It fills in.

That does not read as a question, more like a progress report.

When combined with the answer, the overall impression is that this Q&A slot has been misused as a drawing board for a lesson between a teacher and a student.

Does it make it a candidate for downvotes, and even being downvoted to oblivion? Yes. The downvote reasons that show when hovering on the downvote buttons are currently :

This question does not show any research effort; it is unclear or not useful

Presumably, not useful means not useful to future readers.

This is the trap that this question falls into: the way the problem is framed makes it totally uninteresting and useless for any future reader.

The asker is rewarded in points and actual help for his goodwill to learn but that's completely irrelevant to the community of readers that come to the site to find answers to their questions.

And that contributes to the bad ratio of useless questions versus useful questions, which is worrying in the long run.

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Completely agreed here, which is why I voted to close it. It looks like it's on its way to being re-opened; please consider voting to close again if that happens. –  Josh Caswell May 27 at 19:17
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Since the questioner has demonstrated effort and has posted a question which can be answered, I think it's now a legitimate question and you should remove your close vote. Remember that the purpose of the close vote system is not to get rid of questions but to cause them to be improved.

I think it's legitimate either to answer the question now, or to ask the questioner to incorporate the comments into the question, and then answer the question. The latter may teach the questioner a bit more about how to pose a good question.

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Remember that the purpose of the close vote system is not to get rid of questions but to cause them to be improved does not apply to all close reasons though. –  me how May 27 at 14:15
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