I got this message:

You have made too many incorrect reviews. For an example of a task you should have reviewed differently, see: http://stackoverflow.com/review/suggested-edits/4858266

Now I don't want to discuss if my decision to approve the edit was right or not: I have a lot to learn, and of course my decisions sometimes are wrong.

What I don't understand is that the edit seems to have been approved. In fact, other two users approved the edit, so why does Stack Overflow consider my action wrong?

Anyway, I see that the answer has been deleted.

Also, how can I see all my incorrect reviews so I can learn how to better evaluate the suggested edits?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 28 down vote accepted

The problem is that the question was just a dump of someone's homework assignment. No amount of formatting was going to make it an acceptable question. The phrase "polishing a turd" springs to mind.

The correct response should have been to reject the edit and vote/flag the question for closure (the "unclear what you are asking" option would have been my choice).

You need to look at the wider picture when reviewing edits. Is it a good question in the first place? Don't just be a "robo-reviewer" and approve (or reject) everything you see.

As to how Stack Overflow "knew" about this - this was not an automatic ban. A moderator would have been reviewing recent reviews and manually banned all three users who approved the edit.

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In other words: if 3 users agree to make a wrong edit approval shouldn't SO assume that their choose was right at the end? –  arilia May 22 at 10:16
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@arilia - This would not have been an automated ban. –  ChrisF May 22 at 10:18
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@arilia: though this message might seem automatic, the decision to impose a review ban was made by a moderator who manually looked at your reviews, not by the system. –  Qantas 94 Heavy May 22 at 10:18
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@arilia - I don't think so. You can see all your reviews from your profile. However, if all the reviewers were wrong there's no way to tell. –  ChrisF May 22 at 10:22
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Well, there is a way to tell. Look at the edit closely. If it was awful, and you just clicked Approve fast because you want a badge, you were wrong. –  Wooble May 22 at 10:26
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@Wooble if I was just a robo-reviewer looking for badges I would not have asked a question in meta but rather I would have waited 4 hours and then go on and approve as many edits as possible. Like everybody else I'm here to learn and sometimes I make mistakes, that's all. Hope I Learnt something today and be a better reviewer tomorrow –  arilia May 22 at 10:36
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Separation of concerns. People are reviewing close queue, people are reviewing edits. I don't see that approving a good edit to a bad question is a bannable offense, just because they didn't go above and beyond their task at hand. It's not the question review queue, it's an edit review queue. Should I be banned from the site if I visit the homepage and don't stop in the middle of my day and review every single question and flag question? What if I do but only do the first page and not the second? Where do you draw the line of what someone is obligated to do? –  AaronLS May 22 at 21:20
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This reasoning seems to be somewhat at odds with: Should we edit questions that will definitely be closed? as well as the general idea that being put on hold is not the end of the road for questions. –  femtoRgon May 22 at 21:47
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@femto it all depends on the question. If it's at all salvageable then it should be edited. However this question was just a dump of a homework assignment and therefore not worth editing. –  ChrisF May 22 at 22:03
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this was not an automatic ban -- This is really fantastic. I was sincerely hoping that mods should be more active about banning robo-reviewers. I hope that this is more frequent, though. –  devnull May 23 at 3:12
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Sounds like an edit review button is needed "edit ok, highlight for question review" -- The question becomes easier/clearer to read for the question reviewers. As AaronLS said, separation of duties. Being good at edit reviewing isn't the same thing checking for valid questions. (When writing books, we'd have copy editors, tech editors, and development editors. The CE worked on language issues (which vs that, tense, etc.). The DE worked on formatting issues (bullet style, code style etc.) and the TE worked on content. Thankfully, they did not do each others jobs.) –  lilbyrdie May 23 at 12:55
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@devnull This wasn't a robo reviewer though... this was someone who actually looked at the edit and determined the edit improved the question. –  AaronLS May 23 at 14:33
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@AaronLS you are missing the point. If you're not looking at the bigger picture, you are effectively a robo-reviewer. –  ChrisF May 23 at 14:34
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@ChrisF So by "should" you mean to agree it is a bannable offense? The queue is called the edit review queue, not the you are obligated to do everything-that-a-mod-feels-at-their-wim-you-shoulda-also-be-doing-in-addition-t‌​o-reviewing-edits-queue. –  AaronLS May 23 at 14:40
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@ChrisF No that's absolutely not what a robo reviewr is. That's like calling a a turtle a chicken because it lays eggs. –  AaronLS May 23 at 14:41

Just a note on ChrisF's analogy, and I wanted to say that you didn't really do anything wrong, editing the question as it was has the secondary effect of giving the author a bit of validation for posting it.

Now, had the question contained something more than a verbatim dump of the assignment, like even the most feeble attempt at a solution to the problem, then your edit would have been a good one. But, that's it - this was just someone dumping a problem in what they thought was a magic homework machine, so we don't want to give them any kind of signal that indicates we think that's okay. Taking ownership of their stuff, which you do when editing, sends that sort of signal.

If it's a mess like that, flag as "very low quality" to tell the moderators it's time to smash the delete button. And don't get discouraged, learning the 'review ropes' takes a bit of time, a bit of trial and error.

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The OP didn't suggest the edit he approved the edit. –  ChrisF May 22 at 15:21
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@ChrisF I know, I'm just trying to be as general as possible, as it pertains either way. –  Tim Post May 22 at 15:24
    
thanks Tim for your explanation –  arilia May 22 at 16:42
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It's good to know that we are supposed to review the post itself as much as the edit. It wasn't directly clear to me that reviewing edits was the place to judge the original post's quality. –  Cape Code May 22 at 21:23
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Reformatting text in no way comes close to "Taking ownership". Adding another layer of abstraction to that, approving the reformatting of text is not taking ownership to a power of 2. Editing should not change the intent and content of the question for that very reason, and the very reason for that is so it is still the OP's question. –  AaronLS May 22 at 21:24
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There's a reason even after an edit the question still says "asked {timeago} by {so-and-so}" –  AaronLS May 22 at 21:26
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I was also unaware that flag/close would be an appropriate action during a edit review. I understand why, but perhaps this should be made more clear. All of my reviews are based on the quality of the edit itself (perhaps thats why I occasionally fail the audits and don't understand why...) Also, putting the reason the audited action was wrong could help clarify this. –  BradleyDotNET May 22 at 21:38
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@BradleyDotNET: agreed. I know it's probably not the intent usually, but a down vote/reject/etc. without a reason sometimes feels like a "you suck." And then if you try to ask for a reason on meta, you promptly get several unexplained down votes, which feels like "how dare you question the system?!" –  WGroleau May 24 at 16:59

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