I'm very curious to know the source of income of Stack Overflow. I hardly see ads even on some pages. Is this website is for social work only?

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migrated from stackoverflow.com May 20 at 8:40

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I still would say Advertisements and investors? –  Kets May 20 at 8:37
    
I guess they can make money from some job hiring service like careers.stackoverflow.com –  tintin May 20 at 8:38
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@Mat: Thanks a lot. –  Jitendra Pancholi May 20 at 8:43
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Regarding not seeing ads: stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/reduced-ads Try logging out and see if that makes a difference. –  Burhan Ali May 20 at 8:43
    
@BurhanAli: Thanks –  Jitendra Pancholi May 20 at 8:45
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Money from investor(s) is btw. not income. It's (put simply) "temporary access to money" that the investor(s) wants back - with gain (the whole reason for investing) in one form or another (capital, ownership/control etc.). No free rides out there... –  0x2bad 0xdeadbeef May 20 at 9:06
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Unicorn manure. –  bmargulies May 20 at 15:01
    
It would be nice for a StackExchange employee to answer this, I doubt it hurts the company by revealing some general details about how they accumulate capital. –  Radu Murzea May 20 at 18:55
    
I think one income source is providing a platform for 3rd parties. For example askubuntu.com –  Apfelsaft May 22 at 6:43

5 Answers 5

The reason you are not seeing as many adverts as you'd expect is because of your rep. At 200 you get reduced ads;

http://stackoverflow.com/help/privileges/reduced-ads

The vast majority of users have less than 200 rep so they are served the adverts.

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So... it is very important for Stack Overflow to have as many low rep users as possible, preferably the dumb kind who keep asking crap questions and therefore never pass 200 rep...? Seriously, that's the dumbest financial model I've ever heard of. –  Lundin May 20 at 11:13
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At 200 reputation or higher, users have provided content that is valuable for SO. I can understand reducing advertisements in trade for that contribution. –  Cloud May 20 at 11:26
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@Lundin ... you can have less than 200 reputation and don't be a dumb: visitors not logged in, first time visit, non active users... –  Maxime Lorant May 20 at 11:27
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@lundin: Define users. Type any programming keywords into google and normally the first few hits will lead to SO. The page gets a lot of hits from people without SO account and they are all seeing ads. –  stema May 20 at 11:32
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At the moment my account is under 200 rep, and I can honestly say that in the last year I don't remember seeing ads. I only have 1 on top of the page when I go into a question (and that one is always for Careers) and the 2 on the right side (if you can call them ads: Careers and Jobs near you). –  Catalin Deaconescu May 20 at 11:35
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@Lundin I'm not sure of the exact aims and goals of StackOverflow but I'd hazard a guess that making money is not as important as the value gained from helping out others. I'd think of it more as a disincentive to have low rep. What's the alternative? Reward high rep users with full screen popup ads? –  alex.p May 20 at 11:38
    
My point here is: why does SO have a system that makes themselves dependent on low rep users? That is not very productive for a site which is completely based on the rep system. If we solve all the current problems with crap posts and educate all users so they post flawless content, making a far better site... then SO would lose money. –  Lundin May 20 at 11:55
    
@Cloud 200 rep or higher indicates that the user is a frequent visitor who is likely to return. –  Lundin May 20 at 11:56
    
@MaximeLorant They will not make much advert money from brief visitors or non active users, will they? The ideal user would be one who is very active, yet fails to ever get 200 rep. Being dumb but active therefore makes you the ideal SO visitor, with this business model. –  Lundin May 20 at 11:59
    
@stema I think you hit the head of the nail there. They will leech unregistered visitors from Goggle on all programming-related searches, who'll get fed the adverts. The problem then is when the SO content is so good that the unregistered visitor signs up, and becomes a frequent visitor. And if he starts posting good content and get 200 rep, they will lose him as a source of income. Better then if the SO content is crap, so he won't bother to sign up. –  Lundin May 20 at 12:02
    
@Lundin I'm thinking it's down to what you see as the driving force behind SO. Is the driving force making money? Then place adverts for everyone, or is it rewarding good content - then reward good users with no adverts. Think we've sided with the latter. –  alex.p May 20 at 12:32
    
@alex.p In my experience, profit organizations don't give a damn about "benefit for the community". Especially not if they have investors who expect constant profit. Just look at Youtube, which was pretty much advert-free. Then it became successfully mainstream, purchased by Google etc. Now you can't enter the site without drowning in advertisement. Whether or not SO would do the same is entirely up to the owners, not the users. –  Lundin May 20 at 12:43
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@Lundin - Most people that access the site are finding questions that already answer what they need and aren't making accounts, asking questions or posting answers. I do have over 200 rep on SO now, but only because I decided to make an effort after I got involved in other parts of StackExchange. Prior to that, the vast majority of my use of the site consisted of searching for a question, finding out someone had already asked it on SO and reading the answers. These cases are how SO makes money. The vast majority of traffic is search driven, not people coming to SO to ask questions. –  AJ Henderson May 20 at 15:06
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Interesting answer. I never knew you needed 200+ rep on SO to install Adblock. –  The Blue Dog May 20 at 19:22
    
@Lundin not the low rep users - those who are not users at all. –  Thorbjørn Ravn Andersen May 22 at 6:29

It is surprisingly cheap to run a website.

A GB costs 0.05$ at traffic levels over 100x lower than current SO. A GB is 10,000 SO pages like this one (at about 100kb). So for 1 cent, SO can deliver 2,000 pages.

If they are getting a mere 1$ for every 1000 ad impressions (and had an ad on every page), that is 50$ in ad revenue for 1 cent of bandwidth. Even if my bandwidth costs are low by a factor of 1000 (on the bits used to serve a page side), it doesn't put a serious dent in ad revenue. You do have to add in server costs (which are not just bandwidth), but I don't see how they could be high enough to swing it the other way.

The fixed costs -- setting up the system, managing the community with the core professionals, updating software -- are the significant ones.

Anyhow, at 1-5$ per thousand pages in ad revenue, that is 100-2000k$ per month. Toss on 350$ per new careers post (which here is estimated at 100k per month a few years ago), and the website should be running at an operating profit. And if most viewers of SO pages are not logged in, or do not contribute (they just search for solutions and find them), then the fact that users do not see many ads will not matter to the bottom line of the company.

The people who post (good) questions and write (good) answers are the volunteer labor that produces SO's content. While income from ads that they see is gravy, it is not the meat.

We live in an era of network effects. Large websites, while they do have costs to deal with scaling issues, find their cost per page plummet and the cost to set up the system does not scale with website size.

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by "operating" you're not including staff/office space/... etc etc –  Andy Hayden May 22 at 6:30
    
@andyhqyden yes, just a (very) quick estimate of marginal costs based on traffic. Staff/office/etc does not need to scale based on traffic, it scales based on corperate need and goals. Typically a company will spend most of their revenue on such even if it isn;t required to operate, but often the idea is that spending will grow the company (as even a modest growth rate is worth a lot of expenses) or prevent shrinkage. –  Yakk May 22 at 10:37

Stack Overflow is part of Stack Exchange, a company, and as any company it has to earn money.

SO is a magic trick. It's not where the main business is per-se, although it may seem so. Advertisement is an added extra but personally I find it doubtful it will cover many positions or much of the overall cost of SE as a company. And with ad-blockers and/or 200 rep the ads are gone for the most part.

The trick is to use SO as a recruiting ground so-to-speak, a flower bed to attract the honey bees. Then make sure some register as candidates in the Career section which in turn potentially is turning the pollination process into golden honey by selling access to the database of candidates, aka human capita or resources.

I would assume, without knowing for sure, that there are other arrangements as well such as fees for the candidate, or commission (not uncommon in the field of work recruitment) involved in many cases. But this is speculation from my side.

Investor money is however not income. That is money that needs to be returned at some point, preferably with gain (seen from the investor's perspective).

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Given how crappy the Career site is, I very much doubt they can get much income from there. For example, the site is currently suggesting that I should apply for a job which I'm not in the slightest qualified for, which is 600km away from where I live. In order to make the Career site the main income, they would need far better candidate matching. I'm actually looking to hire programmers right now, but there's just no way I'd use the Careers site for that, when there are at least 10 better local sites just in my country. –  Lundin May 20 at 11:21
    
"Employers have to pony up $500 for weekly access." (source, that was in 2011). But I cannot speak of their engine as I haven't tried it. –  0x2bad 0xdeadbeef May 20 at 12:14
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Which country, @Lundin? If you don't mind me asking. –  Shog9 May 20 at 14:50
    
@Shog9 Sweden, though I assume that at least most European countries have recruitment sites and recruitment companies in abundance. And for every good one, you have at least 3 bad ones. –  Lundin May 20 at 15:07
    
That's the case pretty much everywhere, @Lundin - that's why we're trying to build something different with Careers. I'll pass along your feedback. –  Shog9 May 20 at 15:21

They have several incomes sources, more or less related to SO directly:

  • Advertising shown to users with less than 200 of reputation, representing a vast majority of users
  • Sponsored tags, like (tags with an icon in general on S.O)
  • Jobs Careers and CV searching
  • Investors and ventures

See this related question on Meta StackExchange: What is Stack Overflow's business model? ;)

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do they also get funding from 3rd part users of the API? I am pretty sure Unity3D game engine uses stack exchange for its question/answer site, I would assume they pay for it? –  Rawrgramming May 20 at 11:38
    
meta.stackexchange.com/questions/16054/… There is an intranet solution (not free, of course) but now, 3rd parties public website aren't possible anymore. –  Maxime Lorant May 20 at 11:49
    
@Rawrgramming Unity3D's Answers site runs on AnswerHub, not us. –  Anna Lear May 20 at 15:56
    
Do investors really count as a source of income? –  U2744 SNOWFLAKE May 22 at 0:06

Website adverts, job listings. Also significant investement from venture capitalists.

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I hardly see adds on this website except some places. –  Jitendra Pancholi May 20 at 8:39
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@JitendraPancholi Unregistered and low (< 200) rep users see more adverts. –  ChrisF May 20 at 8:48
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Sale of access to search database (job candidates). –  0x2bad 0xdeadbeef May 20 at 8:48
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I would tend to think that investement from venture capitalists is not a source of income in the context of the question (which I read as 'revenue') –  SW4 May 20 at 10:40
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VC investment doesn't constitute revenue. –  bcmcfc May 20 at 10:42
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@SW4 It's not a source of income in any context! Treating investment as income is what is known as a ponzi scheme, and is illegal in most places. –  JBentley May 20 at 10:56
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@JBentley - I know, it was a polite note ;) Its fraud, not necessarily a ponzi scheme, which is noted for paying out investors from other investment- which this wouldnt be- simply taking investment and keeping it –  SW4 May 20 at 10:56

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