A user (arserbin3) has gone and edited a bunch of posts to replace all "xxx" with "example" — edit comment is along the lines of "remove porn links".

Here is one of the edits:

Here is the question:

I've just run across lots of these in the last 10 minutes. The first I rejected as "too minor" but I see they are being accepted.

So I came to meta to search for xxx porn... (sorry, had to phrase it like that) ... err to search for any posts about "removing porn links" or "xxx" and found nothing.

  1. Are these too minor?
  2. Is this a good idea?

I'm all in favour of it really, but it does go against the rules AFAIK.


Update:

As I said, I'm in favour of this. It looks like the community is also in favour of it. For me the compelling reason was about Stack Overflow being linked to porn sites by firewalls and search engines etc.

share
11  
There is a related question on meta.SE: Help users create dummy links that are not to unrelated commercial sites –  ラファエル May 16 at 16:22
1  
That guy has been on a roll lately and most of his edits are in the "too minor" category. –  Jay Blanchard May 16 at 16:23
    
    
Regarding those other meta links - I don't see any categorical agreement that we should be doing this. –  Richard Le Mesurier May 16 at 16:27
12  
@RichardLeMesurier too minor is not a character count. If the edit improves the post and fixes everything, then it can't be too minor –  psubsee2003 May 16 at 16:28
2  
@psubsee2003 IMO this type of edit does not improve the post, and fixes next to nothing. Check some major discussion about this on meta.stackoverflow.com/questions/253326/… –  Richard Le Mesurier May 16 at 16:30
13  
@RichardLeMesurier why doesn't it improve the post in your opinion? Many users are on work computers behind IT controlled domains with serious implications for "surfing" for porn. Something like this might prevent someone from accidentally clicking a link or running code that has this as a link and then being forced to explain themselves to their own boss or HR department –  psubsee2003 May 16 at 16:33
    
@psubsee2003 - aHA! (anyone else hear that penny drop?) NOW I find that to be a very compelling reason. Thx –  Richard Le Mesurier May 16 at 16:38
    
@psubsee2003 One meaning of "Too minor" is, "edit improves post so little, that it is not worth bumping the post to front page for". Even if edit fixes everything, it can still be too minor if "everything" is just a bunch of irrelevant grammar and spelling mistakes. (This is general note, not commenting on these specific edits, did not check them.) –  hyde May 17 at 7:06
    
@hyde I feel that should be covered in If the edit improves the post.... An edit such as what you are describing doesn't improve the post, so should probably be rejected as "Invalid Edit" or "Too minor" depending on the situation. However, given the situation as described here, I don't see that being relevant as changing the links as the OP described (I dind't the specific edits either) then it would be an improvement for reasons I mention in my answer. –  psubsee2003 May 17 at 8:51
    
Outgoing links in posts are rel="nofollow", so this is at least a little less important than some people think. –  hobbs May 18 at 17:30
    
I just edited Apache httpd — why directory listing is not working. There are some xxxxx.com links left; should they also be made into examples? There was a plain xxx@xxx.com which is now admin@example.com. –  Jonathan Leffler May 20 at 17:39
    
Should maybe the code creating links out of markdown not link certain urls...? –  PlasmaHH May 22 at 15:23
    
My thought? yyy.com –  JakeGould May 22 at 15:25
1  
This question is not worded clearly whatsoever. I was not able to tell, without reading a number of responses, that "xxx" meant the literal text "xxx" (wrongly used by other authors as a placeholder) and not [arbitrary irrelevant site name] or [arbitrary porn site name]. –  R.. May 24 at 20:37

5 Answers 5

Considering xxx.com is NSFW and is generally used on this site for an example link by users who are unaware that it is a real link to a porn site, I would say the edits are fine, assuming the editor is not leaving other obvious problems in the post.

If he is only updating that link and is ignoring other problems, then the edits are by definition, too minor, and should be improved. Depending on how many issues the user left, you may want to consider unchecking the "Suggested Edit was helpful" box.

The reason I don't think this is too minor isn't based on character count or anything. Obviously real clickable links are an obvious problem, but what about non-clickable links, especially in code.

Many users put "xxx.com" as the example link in their code in questions or answers. Someone can unwittingly copy code directly from a post and maybe not notice the NSFW URL embedded in the code. Since many of our users navigate from IT controlled domains, running such code may force a user to have to explain themselves to their superior or to HR. It is better to correct these URLs when we have the chance to save people from the embarrassment.

share
7  
I'd say it would be ok if they were real clickable links. But in this case since they are inside code blocks and unclickable (look at the rendered output in the suggested edit view) I'd put it in the too minor category. –  ラファエル May 16 at 16:31
7  
@RaphaelMiedl in trying to answer a question, I copy the OP's code, didn't noticed the xxx.com url embedded in the code and try to run it. You might find yourself being forced to explain that to your superiors. –  psubsee2003 May 16 at 16:34
12  
If it's really so common to use xxx.com as an example, maybe the site should just automatically change that to example.com on submission. It already strips out salutations like "Hi". –  Cupcake May 16 at 19:29
4  
@Cupcake based on Shog's answer to one of the earlier linked questions, the URL is blacklisted, so it should limited to mostly older posts and people who find a way to get around the backlist. –  psubsee2003 May 16 at 19:41
    
One idea is to have a feature that changes the domain to example.com once and notifies the user of the change. The user would be allowed to change it back in the unlikely event of breaking changes. It shouldn't be too hard to implement. This reminds me of a time in 7th grade when some of my classmates in computer class tricked me into visiting x*x.com after telling me it was a video game-related website. I naively believed them because "xxx" often stood for secret things, and cheat codes are usually secrets. Luckily, I didn't get into trouble because the teacher wasn't nearby. Good times. –  Danny Chia May 20 at 17:49
8  
If he is only updating that link and is ignoring other problems, then the edits are by definition, too minor, and should be rejected or improved. I've never agreed with this, and never will. Stack Overflow does not have a limited number of edit revisions available; it's not going to run out of space for edits. Fixing these links and nothing else is better than not fixing them at all; rejecting such edits, then, is to do a disservice to the community ... and for what? Because the editor didn't fix everything else, too? Please. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 22 at 14:51
2  
@LightnessRacesinOrbit I agree with it to a point. I don't agree that if the user suggests an edit that doesn't fix everything then it must be rejected, but for someone to just do a search for a specific error in 100 posts, then then tries (either intentionally or unintentionally) to farm rep by fixing only that specific error, it seems like a waste of effort. I thought the obvious modifier in the previous paragraph made that point, but if it doesn't, I will clarify –  psubsee2003 May 22 at 15:28
1  
@psubsee2003: I would certainly wish to chastise such editors, but I still wouldn't reject their edits and lose the value that was added, just to make some kind of point against assumed repwhoring. That seems somewhat childish, tbh. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 22 at 15:31
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit that is a fair point, I think it depends on the seriousness of the specific issue that the editor was targeting. In this specific case, improve would be preferable to outright rejection., so I have revised the sentence you had an issue with –  psubsee2003 May 22 at 15:36
    
Reminds me of: thedailywtf.com/Articles/Hot-Notifications.aspx –  SomeKittens Jun 27 at 16:20

I am the user making all those edits. I came across this issue when cleaning up some old posts. StackOverflow no longer allows a post to be submitted containing xxx.com, because it is NSFW, and possibly because some browsers now kindly pre-fetch links for faster internet browsing.

I decided to use http://stackoverflow.com/search?q=xxx.com as a basis for locating old posts that at least needed some editing. But it's important to note, if you look at my edits of them, I attempted to correct everything wrong with the post: typos/tags in title/code formatting/question clarity/etc.

Some such as the example you used, did not really have anything else wrong with the post .. but that is pretty uncommon, and still means everything wrong with the post was now fixed.

I believe every one of those edits was helpful for the SO site.

share
    
I've made a bunch of them too, in the past, but I must admit I've become lazy recently. Might go back to it some time soon. –  TRiG May 18 at 17:47
    
Please limit this to posts that have a reasonable number of views. –  Ian Ringrose May 20 at 7:33
16  
@IanRingrose why? –  AD7six May 20 at 8:27
    
@AD7six, if a questions has only got 10 views in it's life and it is more then a few days old, then it is not worth the time of the people reviewing the edit, as very few people will every benefit from it. –  Ian Ringrose May 20 at 10:42
7  
@IanRingrose there is no edit-review for edits by users with edit privileges. –  AD7six May 20 at 14:19
    
@AD7six, yes, but it still fills up the front page of the site with not very useful questions. –  Ian Ringrose May 20 at 14:21
3  
Churn on the frontpage is pretty significant - that's a very transient effect. –  AD7six May 20 at 14:22
6  
@IanRingrose low views does not necessarily equate with not very useful. –  bd33 May 20 at 16:55
    
@AD7six did you mean 'insignificant'? because significant and transient sound like opposites. –  arserbin3 May 20 at 17:54
5  
@IanRingrose This has already been addressed by Jeff Atwood himself with "You don't need to be too protective of the front page" here: meta.stackexchange.com/questions/102012/… –  arserbin3 May 20 at 17:56
    
@arserbin3 the speed at which questions change on the frontpage (churn) is significant. –  AD7six May 20 at 19:07
    
@arserbin3, this query, might help you. It shows a list of all posts since the start of the year that contain xxx.com in the post –  Howli May 21 at 8:46
    
I can say that I am happy with every question I come across, which has been corrected in favor of readability. And with 2.9 million users, I guess I'm not the only one... –  MC Emperor May 21 at 11:47
2  
I find it quite amusing that someone whose name starts with 'arse' is concerned about offensive posts. –  DeanOC May 25 at 10:02
    
I'm not 'concerned' about offensive posts, I just used a now-banned term on SO as a basis to find old posts in need of edits. –  arserbin3 May 25 at 15:22

In your opinion, do the edits improve things enough to warrant the time it consumes from the community approving the edits?

If the answer is yes, then approve them. If the answer is no, then reject them as too minor.

My rule of thumb: If I would have made the edit myself, I generally approve the suggested edit. But that also means that I will sometimes reject half-assed edits that only change one thing, but don't fix the rest of a clearly broken post.

To be clear, Stack Overflow is a professional website. While xxx links might just be innocent examples, they have no place here.

share
    
IMO they are too minor, but there is precedent for minor edits being accepted under certain circumstances e.g. fixing the title for SEO reasons, adding a single correct tag etc –  Richard Le Mesurier May 16 at 16:28
    
If you're looking for a read from me on whether this particular edit is worth doing, I'd say that it definitely is. –  Robert Harvey May 16 at 16:30
    
Your answer is then that these edits are not too minor, from your perspective? –  Richard Le Mesurier May 16 at 16:31
16  
No, I don't think they're too minor. When do they become not too minor for you? When the link is to a terrorist site? –  Robert Harvey May 16 at 16:33
    
given that xxx is often used as a simple example by many ppl, I don't take it as a porn link. It never crossed my mind at first. Hence the reasoning. That said, psubsee2003 hit the nail on the head in one of his comments above - firewall issues. –  Richard Le Mesurier May 16 at 16:40
    
Congrats on the 100k :) –  paqogomez May 20 at 23:30
    
@paqogomez: Thanks. Took long enough, didn't it? :) –  Robert Harvey May 20 at 23:34
    
Quality over quantity. Though you're no slouch in the quantity department. Certainly something to strive for. –  paqogomez May 20 at 23:59

RFC 2606 explicitly reserves several TLDs and second-level domain names:

To reduce the likelihood of conflict and confusion, a few top level domain names are reserved for use in private testing, as examples in documentation, and the like. In addition, a few second level domain names reserved for use as examples are documented.

These include example.com, which should be used for example URLs on Stack Overflow.

While it may not be worth your time to seek out and edit all non-compliant uses of URLs, it is certainly a valid edit that should be approved, IMO.

share
    
+1: I usually mention the RFC in the edit description field. –  Amal Murali May 20 at 16:55

I came across some of these edits, too. I eventually started skipping them because I didn't know the policy.

In my opinion, "example.com" simply doesn't work in most of these posts; "example.com" is normally a stand in for a working domain, not an example of a possibly nonworking URL. Posts which were clear with "xxx.com" - ignoring the porn issue - become unclear when you substitute "example.com".

Maybe we can use "yyy.com" or "zzz.com" instead.

share
10  
I do not see why "example.com" wouldn't work. Quoting from the site This domain is established to be used for illustrative examples in documents. IMO it represents any URL (working and non-working) –  HamZa May 18 at 21:37
1  
I also started skipping them before writing this question. –  Richard Le Mesurier May 19 at 6:13
3  
There is also a .invalid TLD ... –  Jeremy J Starcher May 20 at 17:33

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .