In this comment in a burninate question, Robert Harvey stated the following:

The tags have to be removed from questions one at a time. That means that 1,828 edits have to occur to remove this tag.

It struck me as odd that SE didn't allow for automated tag deletion, so I searched it and found this answer:

How are tags removed? Is there other cleanup work that should be done first?

(…)

There is an automated process available developers and maybe Community Managers (reference), but this is dangerous (related post) and it would likely be preferred to handle the questions manually so we don't lose the additional attention required on a per-question basis.

In the link to "related post" above, user Dukeling states the following about automatic burnination:

This does:

  • No checks to ensure we're not leaving a question untagged
  • No checks to make sure we don't remove a problematic tag from something with pending close votes (homework was a major pain to exterminate)
  • No sanity to allow an easy undo of the operation

In another answer on the same question that triggered my curiosity, user slugster also observed the following:

Here's a not-as-contrived-as-it-seems analogy: you have a plot of land that is infested with a particular type of weed. It's obviously weed, no doubt about it. You annihilate that weed with some weedkiller. Then you find you've removed the only food source for a small animal you had no idea existed.

My question is, isn't there any way to improve the automated burnination tool? If not by changing the existing tool level, couldn't a protocol (and possibly additional necessary tools) for burninating be proposed? I have in mind something like this:

  1. Blacklist a tag
  2. Automatically warn users that have been active (asking or answering) in questions with this tag of it's impending burnination (offering a chance to the "small creatures" slugster spoke of to point out the importance of the tag)
  3. At the same time, automatically ask from the users who created questions with this tag to change or remove it, giving them a deadline (say a week) to do so.
  4. If no small creatures protested, delete the tag (with the burnination tool)
  5. Delete all questions who had only this as a tag and weren't corrected in the previous step

This would:

  • Save the moderators from having to manually edit all questions (Robert Harvey's issue)
  • Make burnination a longer process, so that even though it'd still be permanent, would allow for users to protest (slugster's issue), and thus render an "undo" option less likely to be necessary (one of Dukeling's issues)
  • Ensures no questions are left untagged (another of Dukeling's issues)
  • Ensures no questions are added to the tag during this "judgement" period and that it does not re-emerge after being burninated
  • Allow for streamlined deletion of unnecessary tags (which seems to be an issue to some, given the number of burnination requests)
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As it happens, we just implemented support for something like this. Still testing, but looks promising. –  Shog9 May 15 at 5:06
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@Shog9 - you turned 6-to-8 weeks meme into 6-to-8 minutes? Agile FTW! –  DVK May 15 at 13:41
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"Delete all questions who had only this as a tag and weren't corrected in the previous step" That is a terrible idea; mass uninhibited deletion of things seems to be exactly what we are trying to avoid here. Deleting a question should never be taken lightly, and deleting a question just because of bad tagging could remove many otherwise-great question. –  The Guy with The Elf Hat May 15 at 14:00
    
@Shog9 you mean actual removal of tags? :-D –  Seth May 15 at 15:10
    
@Shog9 speaking of which, how is the 'turn comments into answers' tool coming along? :p –  Yakk May 15 at 17:08
    
This is a prime example of why that's a terrible idea, @Yakk. Will respond once I'm free. –  Shog9 May 15 at 17:11
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@TheGuywithTheHat I realise the danger in automatically deleting, but the idea is that if a user asked a question, gave it a single tag and never bothered to check it after being warned that it might be deleted, they don't really care. But you raise a good point about otherwise-great questions, perhaps questions above a threshold of votes and favourites could be handled in a different way or by the moderators themselves? Or do you think these are unreliable indicators? –  kadu May 21 at 6:08
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Perhaps simply adding the "untagged" tag to suitable questions is safer and more responsible. I didn't know of this tag when asking the question. –  kadu May 21 at 6:20
    
@Shog9 Good news about the tool I guess! How is it going so far? –  kadu May 21 at 6:33

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

There's a lot of asking and warnings and such with your proposal.

Depending on what exactly the conditions for these are, either we'd send too few notifications for it to make sense to do this, or some users could get notifications for like every second burnination, which they surely won't be happy with.


It's also worth noting that this isn't a silver bullet - there will still be plenty of tags where we'll need to handle the questions individually, or at least do different things. The Google tag was a good example - there were plenty of questions tagged and [google-*] which could've just had the tag removed, then there were questions tagged and which probably needed to have both of those removed and replaced by - just removing isn't the correct action here.

IMO, if there's a commonly used burnination tool, there should also be a selective burnination tool and a tag replacement one, because these actions are often intertwined.


2) Automatically warn users that have been active (asking or answering) in questions with this tag of it's impending burnination (offering a chance to the "small creatures" slugster spoke of to point out the importance of the tag)

How about something like simply displaying the tag in a different colour with the pop-up indicating that it's on its way out? So you'd see it where-ever the tag is shown.

If this is instigated by a burnination request (which it should be), the pop-up or tag wiki could also contain a link to there.

3) At the same time, automatically ask from the users who created questions with this tag to change or remove it, giving them a deadline (say a week) to do so.

I don't really see the point of this. Most people would probably either have asked too many questions to edit them all, or asked too few to care. And no matter how long we make this, some users wouldn't visit the site at all during this time.

4) Delete all questions who had only this as a tag and weren't corrected in the previous step.

Getting rid of questions simply because they were badly tagged is a bad idea - they could otherwise be great questions and have plenty of views and upvotes.

Questions with no tags do get marked as , so they're easy to find.

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I wrote point 3 with four things in mind: i. the tags must be removed, ii. no untagged questions should remain, iii. this might overwork the moderators if the users don't help, and iv. the person asking is probably the most able of thinking of a different tag. It's true that I didn't anticipate, however, that a user could have written as many that they can't be corrected. Perhaps the work is better diluted by also asking whoever voted, answered or added favourites to do retag? –  kadu May 21 at 6:15
    
As to number 4, I admit I might have hurried to conclusions by assuming users who don't reply to (3) probably abandoned the questions. An automatic procedure could be avoiding the deletion of questions above a threshold of votes/favourites/answers. Perhaps however it's safer to mark these questions as untagged. –  kadu May 21 at 6:18
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My main thought is that we shouldn't be bugging users with notifications for this - some may grow to hate the messages for being asked to do, well, anything (which they may actually do otherwise), too much or something they don't want to do. Which led me to my proposal in #2. –  Dukeling May 21 at 13:15

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