I came across a few questions about code errors/design errors in some typical algorithm implementation (graph algorithms, sorting algorithms etc.), where the first comment posted was "This question appears to be off-topic because it is on Computer Science".

I must say I found that pretty annoying (especially because the question authors were usually beginners), as Computer Science (or Information Science) is as tightly related to programming as it can be. And if the question is clear and specific, with code sample and showing some research and effort from the author, what is the point of voting it off-topic?

Are there any people who believe programming is not strongly related to algorithm design? Should the questions I've described be downvoted/moved? I believe some more advanced users create an artificial clear line between computer science and programming, that (in my opinion) is rather blurry.

share
1  
"This question appears to be off-topic because it is on Computer Science" sounds to me like someone who wants to close because the question is a cross-post from cs.stackexchange.com. –  Louis May 14 at 0:50
    
Do you have links to the questions that you are referring to? –  Cupcake May 14 at 0:51
    
This is lame on my part, because actually no. I came across two such questions pretty recently and they were then moved (and so, deleted from SO, did not track them later) to cs.stackexchange.com because commentator advised new users to do so. That's why I ask this question - was it right? –  Byakuya May 14 at 0:52
1  
    
The questions I talk about were written in C, or C-like pseudocode. I believe that is perfectly fine for SO (please tell me if it is not), were specific and even not as "theoretical" as big-O (although I personally believe big-O questions fit SO as well…) –  Byakuya May 14 at 0:58
    
@Byakuya are you sure they weren't just deleted? I don't see any recent migrations to Computer Science (requires 10k rep to see stats). –  Cupcake May 14 at 0:58
    
@Byakuya hold on, I'm looking for deleted questions... –  Cupcake May 14 at 0:59
    
@Byakuya how long ago were these questions asked? –  Cupcake May 14 at 1:00
    
last time I was more active, 3 - 6 weeks ago, I guess. –  Byakuya May 14 at 1:01
    
@Byakuya I found Number of descendants of each node in a DAG, but I might as well answer your question generically. Thinking up an answer right now... –  Cupcake May 14 at 1:05
    
Maybe it is just me being oversensitive here (feel quite some dislike for separating CS from programming too much.), but I'd still like to know what is the expected behaviour in such cases. –  Byakuya May 14 at 1:08
    
@Byakuya here's my short answer for the reason behind separating Stack Overflow and Computer Science: Computer Science and algorithms are high-level and abstract, while actual implementation code is very much low-level gory details. –  Cupcake May 14 at 1:12
    
I believe sometimes it is hard to tell whether the question is already above the "abstraction-level-mark" or not. Thank you for your time (at least I know is is not a simple division I fail to see.) –  Byakuya May 14 at 1:15

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Computer Science vs. Programming

Are there any people who believe programming is not strongly related to algorithm design? Should the questions I've described be downvoted/moved? I believe some more advanced users create an artificial clear line between computer science and programming, that (in my opinion) is rather blurry.

Computer Science and algorithms are higher-level (abstract) than actual low-level implementation code (gory details). I think it is quite appropriate to separate the two, because as soon as you get into the nitty-gritty details of actual code, you lose the benefits of conceptual problem solving that the abstraction of Computer Science provides.

In the cases where the lines are blurry, the on-topic guidelines for each Stack Exchange might be able to help. Let's take a look...

Algorithm questions in general

The help centers for Stack Overflow, Programmers, and Computer Science all say that algorithms are on-topic:

  • Stack Overflow:

    if your question generally covers...a software algorithm

  • Programmers:

    If you have a question about...algorithm and data structure concepts

  • Computer Science:

    This site covers theoretical and applied computer science at any level, including but not limited to...algorithms, models of computation

I would say that if the algorithm is expressed in actual code, then it doesn't belong on either Programmers or Computer Science.

Pseudo-code algorithms are probably more appropriate in Programmers or Computer Science, although I'm not familiar enough with either of those two Stack Exchanges to know which one is a better host for such a question.

When in doubt, try asking on one of the child-meta sites, or in one of these chat rooms:

Related

share
2  
The distinction between P.SE and CS.SE for algorithm questions tends to be one of what type of answer one wants to get. P.SE doesn't have mathjax enabled and tends to give more 'practical' and 'pragmatic' answers. CS.SE on the other hand likes to deal with funny characters that mean things to people sufficiently versed in CS. CS also is a smaller community (1/5th the questions of P.SE) with less historical encumbrances and may be more accommodating to questions that would get closed on P.SE for one reason or another. –  MichaelT May 14 at 1:48

You must log in to answer this question.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged .